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Why are hardware-based manipulations, like black and white photography (traditionally using black-and-white film), long exposure, etc., which also result in an "unnatural" image, acceptable while software-based manipulation (like HDR) is frowned upon by the photography community? Differences from human perception that are due to limitations of the medium ...


21

Is it frowned upon? Photography has always made use of whatever technology was available, whether in the camera, the darkroom or, now, the computer. It's a long time since other forms of art were required to be 'photorealistic'. No need for photography to be either! If you find yourself among people who disagree, work within their rules if you find ...


16

It's a very clever and effective trick, but provided you have good quality source images it is not that difficult to achieve. You need to overlay the profile and frontal images so they match up at the corner of the right eye and corner of the mouth (shown by the green circles). Then it's a case of blending between two layers along the red line. Certain ...


15

Nothing makes raw files difficult to manipulate for someone with the right expertise and tools. It's just that there aren't many folks around who have those tools and expertise. The tools needed to manipulate a raw file into a jpeg are much more widespread and well known than those needed to manipulate a raw file into a different raw file. That is probably ...


11

Why are hardware-based manipulations, like black and white photography (traditionally using black-and-white film), long exposure, etc., which also result in an "unnatural" image, acceptable while software-based manipulation (like HDR) is frowned upon by the photography community? Because we feel we need to put a line that separates photography from painting ...


10

A RAW file is little more than a container for the output of a camera sensor. It has to be processed into an image which gives it full color information at each pixel. As such there are no programs intended to manipulate a RAW file since it is meant as input to RAW conversion software. Since it is just made of bits like any other digital file one can of ...


9

You could have also just asked me directly, the guy in the picture. ;) But yes, it's simply a profile and a frontal shot combined together, if the angles match it's actually not that hard to do.


9

I'm not sure how much they can really be rescued - there's one heck of a lot of blue in there & very little of anything else. Applying a Levels Layer & pushing the mid-point of each colour by eye to where it's at its strongest will restore it a little, but it doesn't look very natural. Quick attempt, each colour set in the same way, just by eye &...


9

I got into photography with a compact digital P+S just before DSLs became affordable, when all the photography experience and wisdom to absorb was about film. Because the people I learned photography from were all analog shooters, when I got a digital rebel and shot raw, I always made certain not to manipulate the image in a way that could not be done "for ...


8

Not in the darkroom, but at the retouching (spotting) table. If you're working with large format film, you can paint them out on the negative. But that's risky. Most of the time you retouch the print. I never did any of it myself, but in college there were artists who would advertise their services in the photography department. I saw some of them in ...


7

To fix this, you need to decompose your image to RGB channels separately. R and G channels are vertically shifted from B channel by 5 pixels each. You need to align these channels vertically. For example I have shifted red channel 10 pixels and green channel 5 pixels from the blue channel. Here is the result with comparison : Shifted one Corrected one ...


7

How can I achieve this effect? Lens compression does not directly have anything to do with the focal length of a lens, though it may seem that way. In fact, it has everything to do with the distance between the camera, the subject and the background. You can achieve the effect by taking your distance from the nearby objects. Technically, cropping a photo ...


7

How the size of different objects in a photo appear in relation to one another is what we refer to as Perspective. Perspective is determined by the position of the camera relative to the scene as well as the position of each element in the scene relative to the other elements in the scene. When a camera position produces a perspective that makes an object ...


6

I don't know if there is any way to do mass masking, especially with an inconsistent background. I would suggest a masking tool like Topaz Remask. It would make pretty quick work of masking for these types of photos. I was able to to create a mask for the sample image in about 1 minute with Remask. If I was using a stylus, I probably could have saved a ...


6

It's hard to say if this is easily doable in Lightroom without a sample image, but I think there are two ways to do this. The used tools are found in the Develop module. Spot removal Click the spot removal icon: Set the brush type to clone: Adjust parameters to your liking. A good start is: feather = 10, size = 50, opacity = 100. Now click on the ...


6

Note: This answer was merged from a question that was almost identical to this one - the only difference was a minor focus on ethics, which is what I tried to explain in the second part of my answer. This question is one for philosophy-courses and is therefore open-ended and purely opinion-based. Therefore, it will be hard to answer it at all - more so if I ...


6

Why... acceptable while... frowned upon by the photography community? The context changes what is acceptable and what isn't. The context of your original question was "traditional photography rules" not "photography community". But what is photography community? Everyone who owns a camera? There are so many subgroups with contradictory preferences that it ...


6

There are photoshop plugins around like imatag or digimarc, which offer this as a professional service. The software encrypts a bit of information in a bit pattern and then hides this pattern in your image numerous times. This will work ok as long as there is enough variation in the image, which usually is true for photographies. The information is somewhat ...


5

Deconvolution can in principle allow you to reverse the unsharpness, but this works best when you have low noise images and you can extract the so-called point spread function accurately. Your camera settings caused a blur because a point in the scene affects not just one pixel but a group of pixels. The profile of the gray values is called the point spread ...


5

ImageMagick can't do this—it doesn't do projection remapping. But there are a number of other tools that do. I'm pretty sure that Hugin or panoramas tools scripting or Gimp and Mathmap could get you there, but I'm lazy so I paid for a license for a commercial application called Pano2VR. Pano2VR can remap equirectangulars to cube faces. Because the ...


5

There are better formats for lossless, high bit-depth image storage and exchange. The main benefit of raw files is that they contain minimally-processed sensor data. So there's no compelling reason for anyone to put the (fairly significant) effort in to writing the code to write raw files. This means that submitting the raw files is a practical way to ...


4

A way I find good for quite a lot of images is as follows: Create a copy layer of your image Select the layer Click Adjustments > Equalize Select the original background layer with the equalized layer in front and visible Use the healing tool to fix the spots Bin the equalized layer Done


4

Purely on the Photoshop side I got pretty close in a couple of minutes based on the colour cast of your 2nd (darker) jpeg. Control over the shot and using a carefully chosen and subtly coloured background will probably get you far closer, plus having more data from the raw image. Once you get a handle on how this technique works it should get you as close ...


4

How about GIMP? It should be there under filters. In 2.8 it is the IWarp filter under the Distort section. There is also a Warp filter under the Map section, depending on which type you are looking for. Update: If you are simply looking for a more user friendly implementation, then you are unlikely to find anything that matches Photoshop for less than ...


4

Currently, without having a rich experience in retouching there is probably very little chance you'd be able to tell. Even RAW files are, in a very basic sense editable. Here are some hints: If you're looking at fashion photography, always be mindful of skin texture. Bad retouchers (trying to please clients) generally destroy skin texture but often forget ...


4

If your intention is to modify the JPEG file by changing some bytes inside it, just do the following: convert JPEG to uncompressed BMP change the bytes convert BMP to JPEG


4

I'd like to suggest that the question is good and is about photography (but needs needs more detail.) Birds can look really strange in flight and knowing this can be of great value if a "looks good to people" photo is wanted. Also, knowing if a photo has been edited is a valuable aspect of dealing with photos (as opposed to producing them) - although ...


4

RAW files are hard to manipulate because there are no tools for this. There are no tools because manipulating them is pointless. RAW files don't hold standard images. They hold the data read directly from the sensor of one specific camera model. They need to be processed in a way specific to each camera model to get a standard image. In order to "display"...


4

If you can get the raw, have a look at those. If they look reasonable, the blue colour might have been a conscient choice. But even in that case, creating a version in natural colours should be reasonably simple (if you have a program that can edit raw files). If the raws are already very blue, you can start with a (rather large) white balance correction. I'...


4

I'm with Tetsujin on the edit to save. To me, it looks like the photo was taken intentionally using a strong blue filter - probably one made for use with black and white films (for contrast) as opposed to white bal correction on color. So, the effect is decidedly intentional and near irreversible. Even the conversion to black and white came out a bit ...


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