52

Stars move. Like with any other movement, what we care about is how much they move on the sensor during exposure: A movement that occurs only within a single pixel is not a movement the sensor can capture, i.e. the movement appears frozen. But when movement takes a point across several pixels during the exposure, it will be visible as movement blur, in this ...


30

The key here is how much light will be hitting sensor during flash, and how much during the rest of exposure. The sensor does gather light during the whole exposure; all of it is blended into one static image. In case the ambient light is much lower, it won't have nearly as much effect on the total light that reaches the sensor, and therefore only surfaces ...


28

Let's look at the last picture. If you want a black background, you need to be careful not to spill light. It's relatively easy to control in a large studio, it's almost impossible in a small room. You need a background which is far away. You could even shoot outside at night if the weather allows it. You need some continuous light to show the trajectory. ...


22

I just read that a normal flash illuminates a scene within a 1/250th of a second. (A flash would keep the scene illuminated for a 1/250th of a second, right? In general, that's wrong. Flash duration is flash duration and sync speed is sync speed. Apples and oranges. The 1/250th of a second is the sync speed of (many) cameras. That's basically the ...


15

It looks to me like they dragged the shutter. That is they set the shutter speed to something longish, but then used a flash. The model is illuminated by the flash with the camera still. Then after the flash has finished, the camera is rotated around the frame's center causing lights in the background to form the radially blurred pattern you see. The model ...


15

To be a bit more specific, this is the superposition of a very short exposure with flash, the clear sharp part overlaid by an underexposed long exposure shot (the blurry part) However, the amount of motion blur for a 1/60 shot is unusually large, so you likely took the picture from far away. This would also explain why the blurred part is so visible, your ...


14

If the camera is on a tripod, and we assume little or no camera movement, then there are two possibilities. Most likely, at 3", your brother is not going to stay perfectly still and there will be some subject movement. You could fix that in part by using flash during the exposure to freeze the foreground subject. And also, it's presumably fairly dark, ...


13

First, I'll talk about what cameras do normally, then about how motion affects this operation. In order for an image to be sharp and in focus, all light coming from a single point on the object being photographed must fall on a single point on the film or sensor. If you take a picture of a face, you want all of the light reflecting off the left eye fall on ...


12

In theory, live view mode should ensure the mirror doesn't flip, if you don't use quick mode autofocus. In practice, though, your camera is a very cheap one, that has probably an integrated shutter/mirror motor, so I assume the mirror actuates the same time the shutter actuates. So, if you use a burst, unfortunately the mirror probably actuates between ...


11

The rule of 600 states that to 'eliminate' star trails the exposure time in seconds should be 600 divided by the focal length of the taking lens. 20mm lens could go to 30 seconds, 300mm lens could go to 2 seconds. Of course (like any motion blur) you will never eliminate star trails- you merely reduce the trail to an acceptable level for a given enlargement....


10

Do the math. Let's say the plane is moving at 200 MPH, which is a plausible value right after takeoff or right before landing. Note that the flaps are extended, so one of these is the case. 200 MPH is 89 m/s. There is some blur. I'd say about 250 mm or less motion of the plane during the picture is about the limit that picture is showing us. That would ...


10

A sufficiently fast shutter would do it, but that also may very well not be a satalite photo. Google maps also uses arial photos and the detail of the plane in the photo seems too high and the plane too large in comparison to the ground for it to be taken from space. My guess is that the photo was taken from another plane, probably moving in a similar ...


10

Slow shutter time Short duration flash Rotate the camera around the optical axis of the lens The dancer is only lit by the very short flash burst, the background is lit by continuous ambient lighting for the much longer exposure time as the camera is being rotated around the lens' optical axis. Slow Shutter I'd start somewhere in the neighborhood of 1/15-1/...


10

You're thinking about the speed wrong. At 1/4000th of a second, if it rotated nearly 4000 times per second, it would go all the way around in one frame. Talk about motion blur. :-) It looks like the tip moved about three inches, so if we assume this fan is somewhere around four feet from center to tip (almost as large as they get), the circumference of ...


9

This was done using a long exposure (possibly 1/4 second) with a flash at the start of the shot, this illuminates and freezes the cookies and then you see them drop too. Most DSLR's offer this as "rear flash" (flash at the end) or "front flash" (flash first) This does appear to have been done with an off-camera flash/strobe, so could either be the result ...


9

AJ is correct here. What you are seeing is the result of motion blur as both the satellite and the aircraft are in motion relative to the ground (the desired target of the photo). Those pretty pictures you see in Google Earth and elsewhere are the result of red, green, and blue filtered images combined into what is called a "Multispectral" image (MSI), named ...


9

If you take a photo at 1/10 second without flash and the image is black, you have effectively "killed the ambient" with your shutter speed, the shutter duration is too fast (with your other settings) to allow enough light to hit your sensor to make an image. When you add flash, the flash duration is very, VERY fast, 1/1000 of a second or faster (depending ...


9

Simple: the flash duration is very short. A full-powered flash is usually around ¹⁄₂₀₀th of a second, and if less than full power is used, it can be in the ¹⁄₁₀₀₀₀th range. If this flash is the only significant contributor of light in the image (and indoors, it's easy for that to be the case), the rest of the time the shutter is open just doesn't matter. ...


9

The issue that you are having is that your brother may appear to be still for the 3 seconds of your shutter speed but even breathing can impact the photo from being sharp. He is still moving even though it doesn't look like it. A solution I found with doing a photo like this is to have a flash set to second curtain and hit him with the flash; it should put ...


9

If the photo you wish to take requires using 1/800 or shorter exposure times, apertures narrower than f/5.6, and ISO of no more than 400 there's only one way to take the images you want in less than very bright natural light: Add the light yourself. Forget static photography where you've got days, in fact weeks, to set up your one perfect shot. My ...


8

Photos kind of similar to this can be achieved using a tracking shot where the photograph is taken from a car in front of the car being photographed, however in this particular case the answer is CG and/or heavy Photoshop. Particularly for the second image, there is no way to viably get that shot sharp without having the background also sharp. On the ...


8

It looks like movement to me - I can see similar at the opposite side of the flower. As it looks to be in only one plane, I'd be more inclined to think some vibration - maybe even just a footstep of someone passing - had caused the flower to oscillate, rather than it being hand-shake, especially at 1/800. I have seen similar when trying to do macro in my ...


8

If I use burst mode, camera starts moving its mechanical parts: the mirror, or the shutter, or both. I don't know exactly. Typically, the order of operations is: mirror flips, shutter opens. This is regardless of shooting mode. Using Live View or Mirror Lock-Up changes the rules a bit and takes the mirror flip out of the equation, but the shutter is still ...


7

If you don't understand aperture and shutter speed, and don't want to learn, and the other answers are already too technical for you, then there are a few simple things you can try. Your camera has several "Scene" modes. Sports mode - this will anticipate that you are shooting something moving, so it will select as fast a shutter speed as possible to ...


7

Just a guess, but this is probably done with a strobe and a slow shutter speed. The strobe illuminates for a very short time, so everything appears stop-motion for the duration of the strobe. The rest of the time the shutter is open, much less light comes from the scene, but will have motion blur. The tricky in this is to balance the continuous lighting ...


7

My best guess is that it may have to do with how the satellite operates. It may capture red green and blue images separately and then combine them. If this is the case, then two things would happen. First, the plane would move between shots for each color. Second, the satellite would move quite a bit as well. While the motion of the satellite could be ...


7

The flash is created when a high electrical voltage is discharged into a slender glass tube filled with xenon gas. The electricity excites the gas and it outputs a blitz similar to lightning. This blitz is extremely short. The duration of the flash can be from 1/500 to 1/100,000 of a second. Most likely your unit operates around 1/2000 of a second. Because ...


7

Very early color reconnaissance cameras did, in fact, use a color wheel in front of a camera with B&W film. At that time the resolution available with B&W was superior to that of color film. Developing labs that could easily process B&W film were also already in place at the air bases from which such cameras were flown. The resulting images were ...


6

The effect you are going for or story you want to tell with your photograph will play a big part in what shutter speed/depth of field you use. If you are photographing a Formula 1 race you might want to show the cars as a blur against the stands. In that case you want a slower shutter speed. If you want to highlight the loneliness of a batsman at the crease ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible