38

In a reflective surface, the reflections are of the surrounding area. 1. The bigger the object the bigger space you need So, in your case, you need a really big space clean, let's say painted on white, like a photo studio. Look how humungous and clean a photo studio can be. I think you need about the space to fit two or three cars. A 90° corner could work ...


22

When light bounces off a relatively nonconductive surface it becomes partially plane polarized, meaning the light tends to have the same polarization direction. Polarizing filters can be used to counteract glare/reflections, by orienting the filter at 90 degrees to the polarized reflection so that it get filtered out. If you orient the filter so that it is ...


22

Much sparkling is due to stereo vision, which is also why the glistening of metal is hard to capture in photographs that are not stereo pairs. Diamonds reflect and refract light glint differently to each eye as well, enhancing this effect. This is one of the little-known benefits of stereo photography: stereo slides of sparkly snow and metals are amazing in ...


19

I am limited on this answer because I live in a warmer climate. The sparkles are given by an exact reflection. You see a lot of sparkles because you move a little, so you receive a reflection of different flakes each mm you move your head, and also you see twice the sparkles because your eyes are separated and each one receive some. The bad news is that ...


17

Use a telephoto lens, positioning you and camera several feet/meters away. Your reflection will be much smaller. Can also use a mirror, which will effectively do same thing: position mirror on one side, then you and camera on other to reduce your reflection. Again, a telephoto lens and distance are your friends. Based on the comments, I will explain the ...


17

Two basic techniques for dealing with reflections on glass should be known, albeit they will only reduce, not totally eliminate them - so for formal product photography, the advice about using an all white or black, uncluttered shooting environment still apply. One is using polarizing filters. In the simplest form, you use one on your camera lens - for more ...


15

Put a white sheet between you and the trophy - some distance from the trophy, but basically "all around". Cut a rectangular hole in it that is about the size of the trophy. Use a long lens, and shoot the trophy through the hole. Now most of what is reflected will be "white sheet", with just a small hole in the middle where you were standing. If you further ...


15

CPL filters do not differ in their photographic properties from linear polarisers; they are merely friendlier to metering and autofocus. But in essence they are just linear polarisers with a quarterwave plane behind them that converts the passing linearly polarised light to circularly polarised light which some parts of a camera are better equipped to deal ...


14

Yes. Here's an example image with very similar conditions to the post you linked to. In this case they are using a circular polarizing filter: Shown in The Mighty Circular Polarizing Filter Explained in Pictures which also explains the theory behind polarizing filters.


11

Just to add to Stan Rogers' answer, here is a non processed example of such a blur happening on the reflected image after a 15s exposure. While the surface objects are reasonably sharp, the reflections are clearly not. Also note the effect on the clouds, which were moving quite fast that night. As Stan mentioned, those artifacts aren't necessarily bad per ...


11

What you are seeing in the photo is a specific type of lens flare known as ghosting. It is an inverted and reversed reflection of the brightest highlights of the scene. If you were to draw an x and y axis intersecting in the center of the photo, all of the artifacts in the photo have corresponding bright light sources at the same distance from center and at ...


11

It is simple geometry and does not involve any editing. You may see upon closer inspection that Mike is taller than the woman sitting aside and she also sits somewhat behind. Photographer stands exactly in the position from which the woman is not visible at all. On the scheme below the red shape is the table the green is the mirror the blue shapes denote ...


10

You WILL have reflections - the question is: what would you like to see there? Seriously. Because 1. You will have to put that there or 2. Do that in post-processing. Both is painful, #2 is a bit less money-wasting, but more time-wasting. :-) You could use a polarizer to remove reflections, if that helps. Makes the object look dull though... Also, you can ...


10

There are several problems with some of the answers you have already received. First, little of this effect is due to polarized reflections from the car itself. The reflection needs to be at a more glancing angle to get significant polarizing selection. Most of the reflections in this image are steep enough to not make much difference to the polarization ...


10

I'm thinking in several options: Put a timer on the camera, and "duck and hide" Use a remote trigger, and just hide. Point the lights away from you and the camera. You most likely are using diffused light. If you are using a softbox you can use a grid so you don't spill the light on you or the camera. If you are using an umbrella you can position 1 or 2 ...


10

Take video instead. A sparkling effect is inherently time-dependent, with tiny points of light appearing and disappearing with even the tiniest bit of motion. A few seconds of video would convey that better than a single fixed image. The same is true for stars, which just don't twinkle in a static image. Maximize depth of field. There are a lot of little ...


10

I use for reference the first half page of hits when I search "product photographs industrial refrigerator"… You'll notice the very first thing you are going to need is a white room, or if budget is limited then some kind of framework from which you can hang white sheets or paper roll, completely surrounding the product. Once you have that, you are then in ...


9

Lighting for glasses is all about angles. The rule is: angle of incidence equals angle of reflection. Typically, the light would be either above or below the subject so that the reflections off the glasses would angle in the desired direction which is away from the lens, like so: This is a two light shot and, while I still need to work on filling in some ...


8

I think the main problem is your packaging, as Stan mentions in his comment. The packaging is wrinkled such that, no matter where you place your lights, you are going to have some surfaces reflecting onto the camera. If you try to move your lights closer, to make the light softer, you'll have light bouncing off those things at literally every possible ...


8

If you have a higher budget, or access to a room with one, and the shot wouldn't be spoiled by re-location, you could use a one-way mirror to hide yourself and your camera from view. Just make sure to turn the flash off, or you'll spoil the trick.


8

Looks like a reflection from glass. You probably took this image from inside or through a glass barrier. At least you did not use flash, otherwise you would have just seen a big bright blob.


8

Use a polarizing filter, which will filter out light polarized in a certain direction (turn the filter until the desired effect is achieved). This works, because reflected light is polarized in the plane of the surface it is reflected from. Note that the sky's blue is also polarized, you'll see a distinct graduation when you look at different angles to the ...


8

Although I am not a Gimp User, but the process I use in Photoshop will most likely be very similar and it should not take more than 5 minutes to reach a satisfactory result. I will start with the Clock first COPY VIA NEW LAYER, the bottom half of the clock FLIP IT HORIZONTAL to cover the top part of the clock SKEW, DISTORT and WARP this Layer until it ...


7

Round metallic subjects inherently reflect all of the surroundings, and the camera will always appear in the reflection. The best you can do is control the environment to make it reflect what you want. If your studio is large, lighting only the subject, and making sure the camera and surroundings are dark may be sufficient. Black cloth or paper with a hole ...


7

You can use a dulling spray of clear lacquer from the art store. You can use a mixture of water and talcum powder and spray this over the watch. Best to tent the watch with a white sheet or towel suspended above the item to be photographed. Use cloth that has no pattern. Light the watch using flood lights from the hardware store. You direct several lamps at ...


7

If you want to get the effect without photoshop trickery there are couple of factors to think about. Generally reflections off of medium boundary (like water) are governed by Frensell equations that predict that the amount of reflected light is dependent on the orientation of the reflective surface and the polarization of the incoming light. The effect of ...


6

Can you do shutter button half-press to focus? That is usually an easy workaround. Just focus on a simple object with the same exact distance, half-press the shutter button, then recompose (keep the button half-pressed, target the camera on the mirror), then press the button fully. Usually works with most cameras... Another way is to put a non-...


6

Note: this was answered before the question was edited to remove the "mirror" in the title How to shoot a reflection in a highly reflective surface (mirror, ball bearing, et cet) without me appearing in it? In case of a flat mirror then there's another way using tilt-shift lens Another use of shifting is in taking pictures of a mirror. By moving ...


6

In some product shoots they remove the glass cover. Period. But as you can not do that, make one light setup with all the surrounding lights, forget the glass cover, and make a second shoot covering that highlight. Compose them in post pro.


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