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In the lab we use a black flocked paper/fabric to eliminate stray light reflections. That should work as well as the stuff from photographic suppliers, but isn't velvet because that's too likely to shed fibres. Thorlabs sell in most countries and accept credit card orders, though I haven't ordered personal stuff from them (only work materials on account). ...


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The usual photography suspects - materials such as Duvetyne - are meant for reflection control on-set or as backgrounds. The fabric is dark enough that you can use them in conjunction with the inverse square law to pretty much ensure that local lights (and reflections from objects on set) will be well below "exposure black" by the time (or, rather, ...


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Cinefoil is the typical solution for photographic and film use. The generic name is “black foil” because “Cinefoil” is a brand name.


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The comments and other answer mostly focus on reflections of ambient light on the surface of the water, which can indeed be greatly reduced by a polarizing filter. However, you ask about reflections from the water fixtures. Those will be very hard to remove using only a filter. The reason is that the fixtures, which most likely are reflective chrome, reflect ...


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I am not entirely sure I understand this correctly, perhaps you can describe it a little more. But generally, the glare from the water's surface can be reduced by using a circular polarizer filter in front of your lens. By turning the orientation of the circular filter, you can adjust how it filters out the glare.


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