Hot answers tagged

34

I'm chiming in to introduce you to: the tub trick. Tubs are great: they're white they're shiny Combined, you get a place to set things that'll bounce around the light and provide for a mostly white background. Here's my tub complete with window lighting: And here's the shot, placing the item on the rail and cropping out the rest: I did use the ...


17

The most typical reasoning for this circular obstruction is the use of a lens hood that is obstructing the flash. It could also be caused by a rather large lens itself getting in the way as well. A similar effect can be found when a wide angle lens is used that is beyond the coverage of the flash. I would consider what lenses you were using, at what focal ...


16

Ruined? That's a great photo! (If you were going for a sort of Halloween effect.) The position of the key light – off to the side and elevated – was perfect for this subject, and is typical of how beauty dishes are used. Now, if you didn't want the shadow here are things to consider: Using a single source you can't have the subject against a ...


12

If "to get good shadows" he means shadows cast by surface features on the moon, thats entirely a matter of opinion. The moon has dozens of faces, from thin crescents, normal crescents, half moons, gibbous moons, full moons for both waxing and waning, as well as eclipsed moons. I've shot the moon a lot myself, and I can't say there is any "right time". Its ...


12

Let's assume you have no equipment at all & are not going to be able to get any right now - then a cloudy day is the best you can hope for. A sunny day will make hard shadows, cloudy days don't. Cloudy days are also a 'good white'. Artificial light is a bit of an unknown factor, which your camera will have a harder time guessing at, especially if you use ...


11

Despite the name of your modifier (Profoto White Softlight 20.5" Reflector), this is no soft light at all. The light source is far away and small enough to produce hard light on the subject. The most common property that makes light hard or soft is how smooth the shadows are. This can be seen from the shadow under the chin on the neck. The shadow has a sharp ...


11

Construct an omnidirectional chamber. This can be a tent constructed using a bedsheet or a rectangular cavity constructed using snow-white Styrofoam sheets from Home Depot or white poster paper. You place the object to be photographed under the tent on inside the cavity. In your case, a tent might be better. You then purchase several R-30 reflector flood ...


10

Which one of my two versions captures the real concept of bodyscape photography? I would have to say neither, since both images are instantly recognizable as a female nude with very little to suggest it is also anything else. The concept of Bodyscape photography is to photograph a human body in such a way that at first glance it appears to either be ...


9

Essentially this is product photography. I doubt bones require special treatment since they are not very specular. The easiest way it to use a light tent over a glass table with a light from below and diffused lights from the side or falling over the light tent at an angle. The camera and lens really makes little difference. You can buy light tents in ...


8

In Camera RAW 7.0 you can just click on the little arrows on the top right or top left of the histogram display. The one on the left turns on/off the shadow indicator(blues), the one on the right turns on/off the highlight indicator(reds). Alternatively you can use the keyboard "O" to toggle the highlight warning, and "U" to toggle the shadow warning. More ...


8

There are two factors here. One is the relative brightness the other is how directional the light is. Normally, light comes from multiple sources or is highly reflected. In this case, shadows are soft or non-existent because light hits where the shadow is from other directions than the one that is blocked. Harsh light is generally very bright and very ...


8

I'd start by making sure to shoot RAW to give the maximum dynamic range. If that isn't sufficient, then HDR would normally be the next option, but that won't work for an active playground with kids not holding still. A fill flash is a good option, but would require quite powerful of flashes. You could set them up off camera and remote control them, but ...


8

This is a photo of Rodney Lough Jr. from the Wilderness Collection, called "Day Dreaming". You have to select the image at the bottom of the page for more info and the high resolution version. It says: Camera: Toyo 4x5 AII Field Camera Lens: 210mm Aperture: f64 Exposure: 45 Seconds Film: Professional Fuji Velvia The softness is coming from the long ...


7

The photographer can claim there are no reflectors all he wants, but there are several things visible in the photo that are functioning as reflectors! The pages of the book the child is holding are acting as reflectors to provide fill light on the face and the bottom of the child's left arm. Parts of the light colored chair are acting as a reflector, ...


7

Lens hoods attached to super-zoom kit lenses contain a shadow monster that is released when exposed to light from the built-in flash. Remove the hood to avoid letting the monster escape into your photos. @mattdm, @dpollitt, @YaoBoLu, and @JohnGleeson are all correct. Light from the built-in flash hitting the lens hood casts a shadow. If the lens is large ...


6

The Tone Curve is an extension to the basic Sliders and thus provides a greater level of tone and contrast control by allowing the user to modify the various different levels of light within a photograph. One of the most apparent such features is the little circle on the “top Left Corner” of the Curve Box. By clicking on this little circle, the circle will ...


5

Just to be clear: the clipping warnings and histogram in lightroom are tools for development of photos. Not for analysis of the RAW-files itself. The warnings does (in the best case) warn you if you're clipping in the output format such as JPEG. The histogram works the same regardless of which module you're reviewing it in. In Lightroom the histogram ...


5

Style 1 looks like it's taken with a flash, but exposed for about 1-2 seconds assuming no flash (well probably -2 EV). The flash is set to fire at the start (or end) of the exposure, and the photographer then rotates the camera (around the axis of the lens) over the ~1 second exposure time. A clear image comes from the flash exposing it, and anything ...


5

The ribs will be visible if you shoot a photo of the umbrella, but they are not visible on a subject in the normal position. See http://www.flickr.com/photos/the_old_curmudgeon/5207772689/in/photostream and the following photos, where I varied the zoom level of the strobe to see how much coverage of the umbrella as its varied. The light is uniform for all ...


5

My short answer is just move the model a little further from the background. The rest are just some additional opinions. An additional thing is subjective, because it is modifying the light style: It is moving the light source a bit to your right. In my opinion the light is a little "plain" because it feels too close to the camera. If you move your light ...


5

The Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 5 Book by Martin Evening has this cryptic sentence (Page 197): The tone adjustment controls are meant to be applied in the order they appear listed in the Basic Panel. I thought the order was a matter of indifference, and I understand what Max said that the order doesn't matter (no matter what order you set them, the final ...


5

If the bones are not thick, using a paper scanner might produce much better results than taking a photo. You can even add some bright-color background paper to remove the background in Photoshop easily, as color selection works better for color than gray scale (TV-like background replacement with chroma key).


5

A two (2) light set up will do this deed. You can use pin-up lamps from the hardware store, best is reflector flood bulbs. Place one lamp high to simulate afternoon sun. Measure distance lamp to subject. Place second lamp at lens height as close to the camera as you can get without it getting in the way. Close placement is the key, you are filling shadows ...


5

Product photography is an independent and broad field of photography so if you want to achieve profesional results you should invest in learning how to do it, a camera that can control an external flash and couple of flashes with umbrellas and tripod.... or pay someone who knows and have the equipment to do it. However, you may try two tricks and could be ...


5

The answers to the linked question address two technical problems, angle of incidence and polarization associated with specular highlights. You should also worry about the clouds, they are way too overexposed and you can't recover details in post. Here's the aesthetic part that answers the last part of your question: Shooting landscapes when the sun is high ...


4

Photographing the moon is a lot like shooting a portrait. When the moon is full the light hitting the moon is coming from your direction, this is flat light, you can get a lot of details but you can't see and texture in the moon because there are no shadows (think about it as the on-camera flash of lunar photography). When the moon is a thin crescent the ...


4

When we say "darker shadows," we're really commenting on the contrast between the bright parts and the shadows. Under harsh light, you are correct, the shadows may be just as well lit (or even brighter) than they would be under soft light. But the bright parts are so much brighter that the shadows are darker relative to the bright parts. Instead of being 3 ...


4

More light (from more directions) might help. I've got a light tent somewhat similar to yours, though its construction is translucent on all sides, allowing me to light it from the outside. I've had decent luck illuminating the tent with speedlites on multiple sides, and in some cases, the bottom, too (I put the tent on a glass coffee table and placed a ...


4

Macro ring light, or large ringlight, depending on the size of your product. A ring light makes object setup easier than a ring flash. A macro ring flash is sort-of required for live-animal (such as insects and other arthropods) closeups since a ring light stresses the animals out, leading to no useful shot. But for product placement, constant bright ...


3

The shadow is most likely from the lens/lens hood which block part of the beam from the flash, since build in flashes are generally not high enough to reach above many of the lenses/lens hoods. I would probably consider to use something that you can put in front of the flash that can bounce the beam to a ceiling, if you are indoor and the ceiling is not too ...


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