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26

Use the ambient light to illuminate the waterfall. Use a fairly powerful flash to illuminate your human subject. The quick duration of the flash will freeze her, especially if she remains fairly still over the long exposure. The narrow aperture you will need to properly expose with the flash will also give better depth of field so that the water fall is also ...


26

You'll want to use a polarization filter. Rotate it until you get the effect you want. By the way, make sure you get a circular polarizer (most modern ones), the older linear polarizers can confuse the light metering and autofocus systems in the camera (no damage, you'll just not get good results).


20

You can merge multiple short exposure photos into a single long exposure image. There are a lot of tutorials on the net, for example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nAuQWfS3pLg Basically, he opens the sequence of photos in photoshop as layers in a single picture, then "auto-align layers", "convert to smart object" and "stack mode" - "mean". Image ...


14

The easiest way is to take a Live Photo, then while viewing it in the Photos app, swipe up to access effects and choose Long Exposure. This will blend the frames of Live Photo together into a single image. I'm not sure how necessary a tripod is for this; since you're expected to hold your phone while shooting, I'd imagine the stabilization+blending software ...


11

Just to add to Stan Rogers' answer, here is a non processed example of such a blur happening on the reflected image after a 15s exposure. While the surface objects are reasonably sharp, the reflections are clearly not. Also note the effect on the clouds, which were moving quite fast that night. As Stan mentioned, those artifacts aren't necessarily bad per ...


11

Take multiple photos, including the background without the subject present. Expose differently to fit each element. Combine in Photoshop. You can also spend more time playing with different settings when the foreground subject is not present, without worrying about keeping her interested. With a tripod and near-perfect alignment, blending layers is easy. ...


10

Assuming you're doing the obvious - setting ISO to the minimum and using the smallest aperture you can - then there's nothing else you can do without an ND filter. They're not that expensive :-)


8

You should get a water tight pouch for it. As long as you won't be submerging it intentionally for extended times, these kinds of pouches should provide plenty of protection. They just need to keep the camera a) positively buoyant and b) protect it from getting wet on the surface.


7

There are a few options I've used to take cameras on the water canoeing and kayaking, both on flat water and through rapids. Here's the order I've done them in, so you know where I ended up: Get a dry bag. (I've used SealLine but there are many manufacturers.) Not one specific to the camera, just a big enough one to fit the camera. Keep the camera in the ...


7

Put your cam on a tripod, your picture in the background, make something up for the drops of water (bottle of water with a pinhole at the bottom, for example), and focus on the drops. This tutorial should get you started nicely: http://www.mcpactions.com/blog/2011/02/09/how-to-shoot-amazing-water-droplet-macro-photographs/


7

Apart from lighting it differently (covered in other answers), consider something like a small shot glass with the liquid in it. Change the composition to provide context clues that a clear liquid exists.


7

Use a polarizing filter, which will filter out light polarized in a certain direction (turn the filter until the desired effect is achieved). This works, because reflected light is polarized in the plane of the surface it is reflected from. Note that the sky's blue is also polarized, you'll see a distinct graduation when you look at different angles to the ...


7

If you want to get the effect without photoshop trickery there are couple of factors to think about. Generally reflections off of medium boundary (like water) are governed by Frensell equations that predict that the amount of reflected light is dependent on the orientation of the reflective surface and the polarization of the incoming light. The effect of ...


7

Short version : stop the madness. Keep your lens out of salt water. Period. Salt water is corrosive and fairly close to the worst thing you can get on a lens. Submerging any lens is an appallingly bad idea, as even sealed lenses are not designed for that. They're designed for, at worst, splashes and typically for light to moderate rain. You'll note ...


7

Third-party camera application It does not appear that the default application on iOS has any fine-grained control mode. But you can achieve that if you use a third-party camera application that gives you access to it. This page examines how to achieve the kind of control DSLR camera users are accustomed to, and it specifically mentions long exposure of ...


6

Your issue is related to the dynamic range of your camera. The sensor of a camera cannot capture such as wide variety of tones as your eyes, the range between absolutely white and absolutely black is much more reduced than the one you can see when you look at the waterfall scene. There is not much you can do about this, as it depends on your camera and in ...


5

This tutorial may help. http://photographylife.com/how-to-photograph-waterfall Besides the two ways described above on handling the extreme light levels, the use of a neutral density filter will also work. The tutorial touches on the subject of neutral density filters. Summary of tutorial: Create photos of waterfalls where the water looks silky smooth. ...


5

As real vanilla essence is coloured, and as that appears to be a real vanilla pod, why not colour the liquid somewhat? If you really really really had to make the fluid stand out as is you could try. Well directed shaped light at appropriate angle using a lens and mask to create a tailored reflection on the vanilla essence only. Not hard technically - just ...


5

Unfortunately, your flashes won't be able to do the job. It's not that the DLites are altogether useless (they're really rather nice units), but the way they work — the way a lot of studio flashes work, and not just at the lower end — means that the flash duration at t 0.1 (the time when at the flash is firing at more than 10% intensity) is as short as it's ...


5

In addition to a CPL as @remco said, which will kill unwanted glare in the water and sky, and somewhat off the snowcaps too, for this scene in particular you would also need to control for the naturally high contrast in brightness between the dark water and the snowy mountain top. To do something like this scene, you may need to stack the CPL on top of a ND ...


5

That particular image almost has to be a fusion of two (or more images). In order to get the blur in the water, you need a relatively long exposure time, as you mentioned. But if you've ever hung around koi ponds much, you probably know that the fish aren't going to hold still that long, and since the fish in that image are not blurred at all (other than ...


5

The native iPhone camera app does not allow manual exposure control. You would need to use a third-party camera app to control the shutter speed. However, there is a Long Exposure effect that can be applied to Live Photos. BallpointBen describes how to use the feature. You may also simulate long exposures by blending multiple frames together. Use the iPhone ...


4

Those are easy actually but with the right tools. The key is that you need a long exposure which requires: Stable support like a sturdy tripod. Long shutter-speed which you dial-in in Shutter-Priority or Manual mode. A low ISO, to maximize shutter-speed. A small aperture, to maximize shutter-speed. A ND density filter should the previous two steps not ...


4

Freezing motion is about controlling the light, more importantly it's about controlling the amount of time the light will strike the sensor. To do that, you have two basic options: Shutter speed Flash duration Shutter speed with ambient light is pretty tricky unless you have a lot of really bright light. The better way to go about this is to control the ...


4

It seems that the focus is shifted backwards. This contributes to unsharpness of main object. You should focus more carefully. Also, you may use even bigger F-number when resolution drop caused by diffraction is not critical.


4

It looks like the magnification of the falling water is quite high. This means that the water moves very fast relative to the frame. My guess is that it took only around 1/20 of a second for a droplet to move through the entire frame. This means that even with a shutter speed of 1/4000, a droplet traverses 1/200 of the frame during the exposure, which ...


4

I shoot a lot of product photographs and can assure you that producing such an image with intermediate photoshop skills is not particularly difficult. About the only thing that may have been actually photographed was the rocks, although I'm not even so sure about that. The watch itself looks like an industry-standard, decent quality render and the sky likely ...


3

I do not know about the in camera multiple exposure capabilities of your camera; however, others have faced this issue with a DIY approach and an ND filter. Photoshop can also be used to combine multiple exposures, I have also used photoshop to simulate long exposures, this works quite well. The trick is to blend each layers with half the opacity of the ...


3

You might be best off taking your normal flash kit and mounting inside Otterboxes. Certainly this swimming shoot video on youtube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m2tMs_boxzI) seems to deminstrate they're sufficently waterproof and IIRC either strobist or the comments on the video tell you in more detail what they did.


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