New answers tagged

1

Depending upon what you are shooting, there is a way to cheat to get an apparent deep depth of field and bright image. Tilting either the lens or the image plane can align the focus to a plane other than the typical perpendicular. From www.australianlight.com : Normal Perpendicular image plane Tilted Image Plane


0

Optical geometry and optical physics are also part of how cameras are built. There is unfortunately no magic trick to focus more light energy on sensors in addition to play with aperture (which must be small in your case), time exposure and sensitivity of your sensor.


1

TL;DR: You can't make a large lens to increase the brightness, but you can increase your depth of field by focusing at or beyond the hyperfocal distance. You didn't say what you were photographing, but with anthotype, cyanotype, etc., I imagine you're probably just trying to get basic photos of mostly static things. Landscapes/cityscapes, pictures of ...


0

A significant factor of depth of field that hasn't been mentioned yet is magnification. And since you haven't stated what you want to take pictures of, it's worth noting. The aperture's physical size is what controls the amount of detail blur (diffraction) and depth of focus (relative sharpness at image plane); but that is not the lens' f#, effective ...


0

The simple way to solve the narrow aperture slow film problem is with studio strobes. Multiple flashes may be required for a single exposure since “A couple of orders of magnitude” is about six or seven stops of light. But with long exposure strobes can be fired manually at your leisure. Strobes will also provide greater lighting design possibilities than a ...


0

You can't have a small aperture (hence deep field) AND a bright image. What you CAN do is make a less bright image more useful by choosing a faster film or more sensitive sensor. More sensitivity traditionally means less quality. But - unlike the aperture/depth of field equivalence - this is not a Law of Physics. Technical improvements can be (and ...


0

Is it optically possible for a custom-built camera to form an image with both a reasonably deep depth of field and a very bright image (lots of light gathering)? Is it simply a matter of lens shape and size and camera body dimensions? There are three ways that can be done. Firstly, you can improve sensor technology. For example, moving from a film camera to ...


1

No. The aperture number determines the ratio between light emitted and light captured. The more light you capture, the more angles of the emitted light you need to catch and different angles only converge in the focusing plane. You can warp the focusing plane to better fit the subject (full-frame cameras and tilt-shift lenses do this), but the more light ...


Top 50 recent answers are included