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The second photographer is using an 18-55mm kit lens. At 50mm all of Canon's 18-55mm kit lenses have a maximum aperture of f/5.6. If one is constrained by using ISO 400 and 50mm in order to match the other camera, then the only variable left is exposure duration, otherwise known colloquially as "shutter speed". Since f/5.6 is two stops slower than ...


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Equivalent exposures are: ISO 400 f/2.8 1/250 second ISO 400 f/4 1/125 ISO 400 f/5.6 1/60 ISO 400 f/8 1/30 ISO 200 f/4 1/60 ISO 200 f/5.6 1/30 Stopping down one stop of aperture is compensated by one stop slower shutter speed, OR by one stop smaller ISO.


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Telescope optical design This is a Bird Jones telescope (more on that in a moment). Regardless, both Newtonians and Bird-Jones designs have a common issue that often prevents them from being used with many cameras. To understand the problem it is important to recognize just what "focal length" actually means. In simple terms, if a telescope has a ...


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You can use your phone GPS for logging your position and then sync photos by time with GPSBabel or similar software. Another option is external GPS tracker like GisTEQ, they usually have their own sync software. Works with any camera (obviously), all you need to sync camera and tracker time and timezone before the shooting session. Both options are better ...


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You will need to refocus after removing the eyepiece and placing the T-mount adapter and camera directly on the telescope's focusing tube. When it's severely out of focus you will not see anything because the light from any stars in the field will be spread too thin. One way to get a new combination of pieces in the ballpark quickly is to use the moon as a ...


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This really sounds more like an issue with the selected metering mode and not using exposure compensation. But there's a half dozen ways to do most things; so... Re-enable focus on the shutter button and set the AE/AF-L button to AE-L only. The only back button focus function/capability you will loose is manual focus; but there is a switch on the body for ...


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I could finally verify that the problem was 100% caused by the lens. It was internally unstable and in certain position the internal connections were not communicating the right values to the camera body (or they were completely isolated). This problem seems at first random happening, then after more shootings it got worse and in the end the lens got stuck ...


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I had chance to finally verify that the problem was 100% caused by the lens. It was internally unstable and in certain position the internal connections were not communicating the right values to the camera body (or they were completely isolated). This problem seems at first random happening, then after more shootings it got worse and in the end the lens got ...


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When I first saw your photos I thought perhaps you'd left an ND filter, or CPL filter, attached to the lens. Glad it was just the aperture setting.


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