New answers tagged

1

You need to set those terms before hand, and it's always best to set a reasonable minimum expectation and overdeliver if the shoot went particularly well. What is a reasonable number really depends on the nature of the shoot. If you do something with heavy post work, maybe compositing images and such, then 1 might be reasonable. In most of my own shoots, I ...


0

I may be a bit biased because I am the app's developer but I created an app to do just this. It is called PictureStory and can be found on the iOS app store.


3

I think what you do can vary, but the important thing is to act in good faith. What I would do is to say they can have good copies of all the images that you consider good, and undertake that these are all the images you consider good, and in particular that you are not sneakily going to make use of any other images, or are holding back the best images. '...


3

Make it clear from the start - your time is yours. It takes far longer to edit the shoot than it did to shoot it. You are already investing more time in this exchange than they are. Secondly - no-one gets all the shots. Tell them your job is to take a mixed bag of lemons & peaches & separate out the peaches*. The lemons go in the bin, the peaches ...


0

Stop down to f/2.8. That, or try to avoid blowing highlights when shooting with your lens wide open. Probably both. What you're running into is LoCA (longitudinal chromatic aberration), where light of different frequencies are slightly displaced from each other front-to-back. It most typically appears as purple/green fringe and is nicknamed "bokeh CA". This ...


-2

It’s a phenomenon called chromatic aberration in which the the areas in your photo in high contrast appears to have blue or pinkish color in the resulting. It is caused by dispersion: the refractive index of the lens elements varies with the wavelength of light. The refractive index of most transparent materials decreases with increasing wavelength.. You can ...


2

The camera lens projects an image of the outside world onto the surface of the camera’s image sensor. During the exposure, this image is recorded. Mostly these images are tiny however image size is intertwined with object distance and image distance. Image size (magnification) increases with longer focal length lenses because the image distance (back focus ...


4

As established in comments, it's chromatic aberration, specifically purple fringing which you see mostly at high contrast edges in out of focus areas. You can mitigate it by closing down the aperture a bit, but after the fact you can reduce the effect somewhat in post-processing. Nikon's own ViewNX-i is reasonably good at dealing with some of this, from ...


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