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1

Sounds like your autofocus area is set to Single Point AF. There's no damage to your camera or lens. Autofocus area can be set as per page 32 in the Nikon D5200 user manual. Note that autofocus mode Single-servo AF-S does not allow to set an auto-focus area other than Single Point AF. To achieve the behaviour you want, set your auto-focus mode to AF-A and ...


0

Nikon D5200 doesn't have a focus motor inside the camera body. Instead the motor is in its lens. You can have your lens repaired at a camera repair shop. don't worry about it. It's probably not a big deal.


1

What might suit your needs is a gadget colloquially called a techart adapter - this is a motorized helicoid adapter that converts Sony-E/NEX to LTM mount, and can be used with something-to-LTM adapters. Since the a6400 is a PDAF camera, it should work well. This will, however, not be good with internal focusing lenses or most zooms (both hate it if you play ...


3

This looks like a video/cinema focus-puller's tool [albeit a budget one] Even the good ones will not snap focus like a stills camera's AF. They are meant to be 'smooth' not 'fast'. Even if you could access the camera's API [unlikely, as already mentioned by scottbb] then something this cheap will either refuse to keep up, burn itself out in half an hour, ...


2

No. At least not in any of the current DSLR and mirrorless camera systems (Canon, Nikon, Pentax, Sony, etc.). Their autofocus sensors are not exposed to any APIs or control over USB. Conceivably, it might be possible using something like the Canon Hack Development Kit (CHDK), for at least some bodies. But that "conceivably" is only if a bunch of reverse ...


1

There are a lot of good detailed answers here, and they are correct, but I'd like to key in on a simpler truth. At f/1.8, there isn't enough depth of focus to get your subjects whole face in focus. If you focus perfectly on their eyes, the image will look good, but if you are focused a little in front or a little behind, it will be obvious that you've ...


1

Typical AF problems (classic, not live view AF): body and lens, while both within specification, are badly matched, exacerbating each other's problems. => use a body with microfocus-adjustments. My 70-200 f/2.8 was always soft at f/2.8 (and I often have a bare minimum of light), but a new body with micro-focusadjustments made it a whole new lens with a ...


0

Usually the auto focus misses by a couple of inches (focus and sharpness is best about 2 inches closer to the lens) when it comes to the sharpest part of the picture. Based on your description, the lens is "front focusing". You can determine by how much) see below) and MAY be able to alter it. To determine if a lens is front or back focusing, and by how ...


0

Try to get further from the subject. It increases focus area, in comparison to shorter distances. A source of knowledge: https://digital-photography-school.com/depth-of-field-and-the-importance-distance-to-subject-plays/


48

You're not doing anything wrong. You're just finding the limits of the camera/lens combination you are using. The EF 50mm f/1.8 (in various versions) has been known as the "plastic fantastic" for a long time. For what it can do at what it costs, it is a fantastic value. But it isn't really a fantastic 50mm prime lens when compared to many others that, ...


11

It might be best if you post an example image, but in any case, there are a few things to bear in mind. First, shooting at such wide aperture provides very little leeway between the near and far limits of depth of field. Using a depth of field calculator, you will find that at 6 feet from the subject, only 4 inches will be in focus. Should your lens be off, ...


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