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1

DPI is only meaningful for print or a physical display. If you are still seeing and printing the image at the same size, then nothing changes. Now, if you change the DPI and render the image at that DPI, the image will become smaller. This will make the image look sharper just because details are smaller.


0

It doesn't. Well, let's say, it doesn't if you only change the dpi without re-rendering the image. DPI is not very meaningful for image-files, at least until you print them. So unless you change the pixel dimensions of an image, changing the DPI will do nothing in Photoshop other than attaching this value to the image. You can test this by disabling ...


2

I have a 20MPx compact camera and an old Nikon that has 5MPx. I have configured the compact one to also only capture at 5MPx because it's optics are not good enough to capture any detail beyond that detail in normal usage. Optics is responsible for projecting the image on the chip. Once the scale of blurriness is bigger than a single pixel, having more ...


9

It depends on the lens and the aperture at which it is used. Even a theoretically perfect (diffraction limited) lens can only generate an average of ~16MP at f/11 on a full frame sensor, and it goes down by ~50% for each 1.5x crop factor (7MP for APS, 4MP for 4/3, green wavelength). This chart shows the maximum resolution theoretically possible at each ...


1

I'm new here thus I cannot reply to comments. I'm agreement with all the responses above. I will also add that each output format is has an optimal resolution. If one wishes to print a full, 'uncropped' image, then the RAW file should be converted to JPEG image at the appropriate resolution. And if the image is sharp and clear at that output resolution, then ...


13

Higher megapixels do not add to lens sharpness. This has been found by many Canon EOS 90D owners. It has 32.5 megapixel APS-C sensor. Its pixel density is the same as 83.2 megapixel full frame camera. For example, Canon has announced a list of recommended lenses for EOS 5DS that is a 50.6 megapixel full frame camera. Interestingly enough, Canon has not ...


11

Not necessarily. Each lens can only produce a certain amount of detail, which means at some point it doesn't make sense anymore to increase pixel count because the given lens is not good enough for it. Higher megapixel sensors are also more vulnerable to camera shake and usually perform worse in low lighting conditions (as the individual pixels are smaller ...


0

If you’re confused about whether to use autofocus or manual focus, I would say, there’s only one correct distance to focus on every photo. Assuming nothing is preventing accurate autofocus or accurate manual focus, the photos you capture will be identical with either technique. You need to go through manual focus when autofocus can’t do a good deal with your ...


4

If your subject is far away, as is often the case in landscape photography, you might as well focus manually, as the depth of field is usually so great that clinically accurate focus is not necessary. You also typically have copious amounts of time to frame your shot and focus, so speed of focusing is not crucial either. However, unsharp images occur not ...


0

It looks like a poorly made or assembled lens that has become extremely misaligned. Did you first notice the issue shortly after you might have dropped the phone and it took a serious shock impact? It doesn't look so much like a moderate tilt issue, such as would be within the range of a view camera with movements or a tilt-shift lens, as pretty much ...


3

The lens is tilted and/or shifted. Sometimes, these kinds of effects are desirable, such as this picture which is called tilt-shift photography. Since this is a very cheap phone and not an interchangeable lens camera, repairing it would likely cost more than the value of the phone. Solution: get a new camera, either phone if that's what floats your boat ...


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