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1

"its known that lenses are generally sharpest at the F/8" That is not correct. Some lenses are sharpest at f/8, most reach their max at one to two stops from wide open, and some are sharpest when wide open. You need to test your lens/combination, or find a good test online. Strictly in terms of sharpness, you should use the widest aperture that doesn't ...


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It looks reasonably sharp :) Especially compared with handheld shots. What seems to be a major case of residual "unsharpness" seems to be halos around eg the neon signs in the upper right corner. Since these are overexposed severely (see right of histogram), even the slightest lens flaw artifact (flares, coma, spherical aberration) will be very visible ...


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There are some rather unnatural halos that hint that the camera's internal sharpening goes up to the secret "11" mark: There is no real purpose shooting "raw" if you don't intend to spend significant time on the picture later...


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Obvious points, but shutter speed and stability contribute to sharpness as much as (or more than) the type of lens -- especially at long focal lengths. You absolutely must use a tripod, and a relatively fast shutter speed, and longest possible depth of field (meaning smaller aperature), which means the best lighting too, to ensure sharpness relative to ...


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Assuming these pictures are using the full frame of your camera, or are a similar crop of it, and the same aperture, both pictures are sharp. But, the single kid frame may be 0.6 m wide, you could easily manage her pose. In short, it is a headshot. and that flagpole, which makes the composition so nice, might be 6 m high. The lighting looks more diffuse. ...


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