36

In addition to what has been written (cropped feet), in my opinion the greed hedge in the background draws a lot of attention away from the child because it is so heavily saturated. Since the background is green, a colour far away from any skintones, one could try and desaturate the green of the whole picture a little. How far you go with this is a matter ...


23

The leaves in the background aren't an interesting part of the photo, and they're a bit of a distraction. Blurring the background by shooting at a wider aperture (smaller f-number) would turn the background into a soft field of green and draw more attention to the child. I used a gaussian blur to simulate the decreased depth of field that a larger aperture ...


21

The first and obvious problem is framing. Almost never do you want to put a small head in the middle of a large picture. There is much space to the left of the child in the picture, but it doesn't add anything (in my opinion). My first instinct would have been to use vertical format, probably capturing a little above and below the child, then deciding in ...


20

Legal Disclaimer The following is for general information purposes only and should not be taken as legal advice for any particular situation. If you have a specific concern you should consult with an attorney familiar with the relevant issues in the jurisdiction in question. Since the questioner indicated they were located in the U.S., this answer assumes ...


19

To improve your portraiture, try simplifying your composition to better focus the viewer's attention on your subject. How? (No particular order): Square yourself with the background. You are closer to the background camera left than you are camera right. Use less distracting backgrounds--the brightly coloured curb running through the photograph pulls the ...


13

No question: adding an external flash. See previous question Prime lens or flash: which upgrade will most improve baby photos?, which covers some of this. A flash can freeze motion, and makes it easy to get enough depth of field to get the whole scene in focus. And when you can move the flash off camera, you can create nice light where it doesn't exist ...


13

Your exposure is a function of - The amount of light reaching the subject (with the quality and direction of the light allowing you to control the effect) The shutter speed (too long leads to blurring as you've seen) The aperture (wide lets in lots of light with shallow depth of field, narrow the reverse) The ISO (like an amplifier dial on a hifi - ...


12

Legal Disclaimer The following is for general information purposes only and should not be taken as legal advice for any particular situation. If you have a specific concern you should consult with an attorney familiar with the relevant issues in the jurisdiction in question. The question includes the following and the answer below should be considered with ...


11

The vegetation in the background is way more saturated than everything else on the photograph and that it looks rather disturbing — I have never seen leaves saturated that much. Leaves should be almost as saturated as the toys or probably even less.


9

A pop-up flash has barely enough power to work indoors of a residential space; in larger rooms, professional photographers have practical reasons why they carry separate large flashguns. The Puffer, whilst making the light slightly less harsh and therefore more pleasing, does it so at the expense of chewing the power even further down. So, your gear is ...


9

In your first photo, sitting in the grass, the adult is centered in the frame. There's no way around that: the bigger adult being in the center of the frame is going to dominate and hold the viewers attention. In that photo, you can recompose/crop to make the adult not be centered to better balance the scene. Similarly, notice how much grass surrounds the ...


9

In each of your shots, the adult takes up much more percentage of the frame than the child, therefore it "dominates" the scene. To avoid this, you can try the following things: Place the Adult near a border of the frame and don't show the whole body, place the child more near the center. (Always depending on your composition and what you want to tell) Use ...


9

The answer @eftpotrm gave is pretty comprehensive, but let me highlight the single piece of advice that is by far the most likely to give you the desired results: Get a lens with a large maximum aperture, like f/1.8 !! The smaller the number, the better, but f/1.8 is the best that's typically available at a reasonable price. It's going to be a prime lens (...


7

I'm no specialist in photography, but my answer would be to put the children in front of the adult, e.g. with the adult holding him, such that, in perspective, it becomes bigger in relation to the adult. The best example I can come up with are these three "photos", which depict the exact same thing, but with different dominations: Child dominates Adult ...


7

The easiest technique - have the child cover up part of the adult. Place the child in front of the adult - either sitting in the adults lap or standing where the adult may be sitting. If you shoot them as two separate subjects they'll always look uneven.


6

Reclaiming the moral high ground [tm] :-) ... For comments on "street" or people-photography generally see my answer here. For answers on reclaiming the moral high ground from the creeps and perverts, read on ... It's interesting to note that while I probably address the or a major aspect of David's question, and others tend not to so, or do so only ...


6

Ignoring the composition, color and editing that everyone else has answered perfectly clearly, I'd like to point out the blanched areas on the cheeks and forehead. These areas are a product of overhead light which has blown out all the color in the top surfaces of the baby's face.Your use of fill (flash round reflections in pupils) can't fix that and may ...


6

You have several things to think about. First off, you would probably like the photos to closely match what the photos of the other students look like, so pay attention to the background, the pose, and the lighting angle in the other photos. Secondly, you have to "take out" the effects of the fluorescent lighting if you do use the room you mentioned. ...


5

Flash (by far), then lens or body depending on the number of lenses you already have and how close you are to a meaningful increase in max usable ISO. Flash adds far more than twice the amount of light, so it is a far larger improvement than an f-stop faster lens. Lenses that are one stop faster will double the amount of light you can take in, but will ...


5

If you're going to 'show them to the world' - you need to ask. That's common courtesy and, more importantly, you may not be ingrained in their lives enough to know if there's a serious reason to not want them up and public. (For example, I have a friend who went through a messy adoption and posting pictures of his kids on Facebook could complicate his life.)...


5

Legally photographing children and adults is the same - however (and it's a big however) People get really upset when they think children are in danger - you can be physically attacked by parents, you can be harassed by police, you can be arrested and you can even be convicted and labeled a pedophile for life - even if you didn't do anything illegal. Don't ...


5

This is a situation where you need to be flexible and able to play it by ear. Evaluate which child is the highest risk for lasting the shortest amount of time before they become harder or impossible to work with. Balance that with any child that is already being difficult and might do better if you save them until later when they might be more manageable. ...


4

Most Chuck E. Cheese locations that I've been in have generic white ceiling tiles. If that is the case at the location in your town, I would try bouncing the flash off of the ceiling with an external flash rather than using a Puffer. Although the cost is a bit more, the results will be that much better. You can get a Yongnuo YN-468 II i-TTL that is ...


4

The way to capture fast moving subjects like your daughter is to use a shorter shutter speed. No big surprise there. The way to achieve a faster shutter speed, though is often misunderstood. The camera is only part of the equation. The speed of the lens is the other part. Before you decide to buy an entirely different camera, I would encourage you to try ...


4

Others have made some good suggestions regarding the placement of adult and child, but one thing I notice has gone unmentioned. It's not only the placement of the adult relative to the child that makes him dominate the scene but also the fact that in both photos the adult is the active participant while the child looks passive. In the first photo, the adult ...


4

Some of the strangeness can be attenuated by rectifying the horizon.


4

Avoid posing your subjects You'll get more natural expressions if you can compose shots where the subject is actively doing something, rather than just looking at the camera - and you may well find that these make better scenes for your memories or to share with your friends. So, if you can concentrate on photos of your child concentrating on riding a bike ...


3

There isn't a right or wrong answer here unless your local jurisdiction has laws about it. As long as you are reasonable about what you put online, I don't expect there to be any problems as long as the parents aren't complaining about it. Use your judgement and share the photos you spend time and effort to produce. That said, if they were friend's kids ...


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