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51

Who in the world buys large primes? Wildlife and sports photographers, mostly. I'm struggling to see how one would find use in a long focal length prime, 300mm and above for example: without zoom, isn't your shot composition always at the mercy of how close or far away your subject is, meaning heavy cropping is almost always necessary in post? It's the ...


24

The 24-70 is an incredibly good lens - it's as sharp wide-open as just about any prime at every focal length across just about its entire field. But it's only 24-70. As you're talking about a full-frame Canon, that's as wide (16mm * crop factor of 1.5 = 24mm), but you'll be losing a lot of length at the telephoto end - your 90mm on APS-C is equivalent to ...


22

Presumably because the people who buy their first DSLRs mostly come from the point-and-shoot world and care about the versatility afforded by the zoom more than about image quality. Also, a 50mm is way too long to be a good "default" lens with an APS-C camera, and good-quality ~30mm lenses are, due to certain quirks of optics, much more complex (and thus ...


21

The key to using prime lenses effectively is to use them enough that their field of view becomes instinctive to you, so that you can stand somewhere and know what the resulting image will look like, without even looking at the viewfinder. Then, rather than watching your camera, you watch the world, and when you see a photograph, you take it. With a zoom ...


21

I'm by no means an expert. But one thing that I've tried is having 2 bodies. It sounds expensive, but it doesn't necessarily have to be. I have an old Canon Rebel, and more recently bought a Canon 7D. I was shooting a series of soccer matches and ended up putting a long lens on the 7D and a wider lens on the Rebel. Most of my shots were with the long lens ...


17

A prime likely still has several advantages over a zoom at a given focal length. (Well, depending upon your needs and habits.) A less complex optical design. All else being equal, a less complex design is likely to have fewer compromises, which means the prime is more likely to have less distortion of any sort -- pincushion, barrel, coma, and chromatic ...


16

I am on the edge of investing in the Sony a6000 ... Ok, fallacy #1. :) You never invest in a camera unless you're a pro and can write it off on your taxes. Cameras depreciate. Even while new. Your "investment" will never give you any monetary returns. This is an expense, pure and simple. (If anybody has other suggestions in that price range - I am ...


15

Provided you keep focus distance, ISO, aperture & shutter speed the same, and you zoom your 18-55mm lens to exactly the same focal length as the 50mm prime (which wont be exactly 50mm) then the images will very extremely similar when viewed as a whole. On closer inspection you will see differences in the level of distortion, sharpness, contrast and ...


15

Would switching to full frame Canon and getting that lens be an upgrade over my Fujifilm gear? For some shooters it would be. For others it would not. For a true photographer it shouldn't make a ton of difference either way. They'll do good work with either. One system may make doing that work easier than the other, but the work you are describing can be ...


14

The 50mm is a simpler design compared to the retrofocus 35mm, as such it's much cheaper and slightly sharper. 50mm on an APS-C body corresponds to about 80mm on full frame, which is a very popular focal length for portraits. The kit lens covers the wide angle needs so sometimes a longer prime makes a good companion, for tighter compositions with blurred ...


14

I think this is a great exercise and can really help you with your photography — even if you end up using zoom lenses in the future. And, there is a commonly-used "trick" here — it's called One Lens, One Camera, One Year, suggested by longtime prime-lens enthusiast Michael Johnston (also see his The Case Against Zooms). A Method The original suggestion was ...


12

Just because you buy a zoom lens doesn't mean it is the only lens you are now allowed to use! And just because you are using a zoom lens doesn't mean you can't still alter the composition of your photographs by using your feet! The advice you have been given is primarily a warning not to stand in one place and stop exploring shooting angles and perspectives ...


12

Let's start with what is similar with all three of these lenses: They all have a focal length of 50mm. You should also be able to have a lot of overlapping focusing distances and aperture values. Now, to what's different. When it comes to a zoom lens, they tend * to have a different maximum aperture values that are smaller than with a prime. The advantage ...


11

First, focal length is a property of a lens (by lens I mean a piece of plastic or glass that's inside your camera's photographic lens system). If you just have a single lens (think magnifying glass) and move it around in relation to an object and your projection plane (or a sensor in a camera for that matter), the focal length of that lens remains the same. ...


11

With an APS-C camera like your T4i, 50mm is a good focal length for a portrait lens. This gives you several decent options: Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 II for only around $115. This is a cheap, plastic-body lens, but it benefits from the ease of making lenses in this focal length, and years of history. This is actually my top recommendation, as it leaves you room ...


11

This is called axial chromatic aberration (or longitudal chromatic aberration) and it's fairly common with large aperture lenses. It appears as a purple halo around objects that are closer than the plane of focus and as a greenish one around objects that are further, regardless of where they're located in the frame. It often shows up around highlights, ...


10

More or less, today's lenses are better than yesterdays. Historically, yes, primes have been substantially better than zoom lenses. Most modern primes are still outstanding. Zoom lenses, however, have steadily improved -- better coatings, lens formulas, and more precise glass grinding has allowed zooms to improve substantially. Pro level f2.8 zooms are ...


10

What's the point in high quality rather expensive cameras with permanently mounted prime lens? To take pictures. By creating a camera intended for only one focal length a lot of things cans be optimized for that particular lens. The camera can also be simpler with no need to adapt to a variety of different lenses and focal lengths. A through-the-lens ...


9

Assuming that: The focal length has been recorded in the file metadata You are running a Unix-like OS such as Linux or OS X (or Cygwin in Windows) You have installed the exif command line tool Run this on the command line: exif /path/to/your/photos/* | grep "Focal Length [^A-Za-z]*|" \ | awk -F "|" '{print $2}' | awk '{print $1}' | sort | uniq -c | sort ...


9

The STM version replaces the II version. Optically, they are identical. However, the STM has several advantages: 7 rounded aperture blades vs. 5 non-rounded (no more pentagonal bokeh) Metal lens mount vs. plastic A much improved manual focus ring STM vs. Micro Motor (should be faster and much quieter) FTM (Full Time Manual) focusing 13.8" (350mm) MFD (...


9

About a decade ago, prominent photography blogger Michael Johnston wrote an essay describing his ideal digital camera, which he called the Decisive Moment Digital, after Cartier-Bresson's phrase. The theoretical "DMD" was a compact camera with a large sensor and fixed prime, just as you describe here. Michael is a popular and persuasive writer, and this ...


8

There are a number of reasons why the 'kit lenses' we have now became commonplace. Back in the early 90's (when I started out) zoom lenses were heavy, bulky, suffered compromised optics and came with a big price premium even at the budget end. Lens makers had been working on those issues for a long time anyway and by the end of the decade the value gap (...


8

You might also want to take into account the following: That 24-70 mm doesn't cover even half your current range. You really like the 90mm for portraits, and 90 mm is outside that recommended range? At best you'd have to adapt your shooting to that new lens An incredibly sharp lens is only useful if you use that sharpness for e.g. larger prints. If ...


8

Since the choice of lens is highly subjective, we can’t tell you definitively which to pick. Instead, I’ll offer a suggestion about how to make the decision yourself. Each lens has many variables that can be evaluated only with the specific lens: sharpness, bokeh, speed, physical dimension, weight, etc. But one thing you can test quite generically is ...


7

There is a technical reason for not incorporating image stabilisation in a typical high speed Gauss type lens. Optical IS requires a moving lens component that displaces the image laterally without defocusing. This can be done in most multi-component asymmetric constructions, by moving some component controlled by a stabilising sensor. However the heavier ...


7

User convenience. Zoom lens quality and speed is good enough for everyday use and the convenience of being able to change framing instantly, trumps the gains in quality from primes. The zoom thing is not universally true, however, because there are some (expensive) cameras such as Fuji and Leica models that have a fixed 35mm lens, which is the 50mm ...


7

Any actual (photo)technical advice aside, my recommendation would be: Pursue whichever plan keeps you most interested in photography. The underlying question is: What do you try to achieve? If you have specific goals, one method or another might be better. If you are in this for pure fun (like I currently am), follow the path that is more fun to you and ...


7

Am I correct in understanding that switching primes all the time is highly inconvenient, and you risk getting your optics dirty or dropping your lens... If you have a large collection of primes and use them exactly as you would a zoom, then yes you will be changing lenses almost constantly at considerable inconvenience. Prime shooting requires a different ...


7

Prime lenses use simpler optics with fewer glass elements. They don't need the ability to change their focal length, so fewer compromises have to be made with the design. This allows for cheaper and higher quality image reproduction. Less chromatic aberration, more sharpness, better color reproduction, etc are all made much easier because of the fewer ...


7

I wondered if it is a common knowledge how to "jump off" the zoom lens hook I don't think this is necessarily a good idea. The problem is basically sensor size. With a 1/1.7" sensor, it is easy to build compact and light lenses. Even super zoom telephoto lenses are rather compact. The downside is that getting "beautiful pictures with a fast prime lens" ...


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