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6

All versions of the iPhone 8 have a 12 MP rearward facing camera with a 4:3 aspect ratio. That figures to about 3000 pixels x 4000 pixels in vertical (portrait) orientation. That's more than enough to furnish an image that is 2,400 pixels high and 1,600 pixels wide as recommended by Smashwords. It is just over twice as wide as the stated minimum width ...


4

Exactly. And Lightroom and some image editors will allow you to export an image with a desired value for the "long edge" (rather than for desired width or height). It keeps your resize operations much more consistent, assuming you don't do a lot of cropping.


3

You can't. Not with a lossless format like PNG. Image compression depends on the amount of information in an image, ie. the detail present. A square of a solid blue contains little information and can thus be described simply (as i did here). If i were to describe the Mona Lisa to you, i'd need a bit more than five words. Software compression works the ...


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Update: @StephenG accurately noted that for such a large image, IM (ImageMagick) convert may cause problems. The simple convert command could lead to 100% of your CPU being used, or freeze, hang, or crash. One solution (untested, the download of the 10GB file keeps on aborting) is to do the following: env MAGICK_TMPDIR=/path_to/10GB/hdd_space \ convert ...


2

You should nearly always resize the photos before uploading them to a web site. The web designer should be able to tell you what the optimal dimensions are. Use the option Save for web in Photoshop. The quality level you have to choose depends on the photo. Some can be compressed more without showing compression artifacts. Choose convert to sRGB to avoid ...


2

You can do this with xnView or xnConvert. Both are free tools. For each batch conversion you can add multiple commands, resize the image to a certain size, fill with colour if needed, follow orientation, etc. There are Windows, Mac and Linux versions available. They have a support forum in case you need help using those tools. P.S. not related to xnView, ...


2

Yup, just make sure neither the width nor the height exceed 2500px for your picture.


1

It will not look good by definition. When increasing the resolution you are essentially trying to add information to the image where there is none. There are some AI assisted methods and smart enlarging filters, but all they do is just an educated guesses. However... looking at a print is a different experience than looking at a photo on a screen. I have ...


1

I can't stop recommending IrfanView if you use windows. Just be careful with the options you choose, specially Overwriting and deleting files, make some tests with dummy files and folders before running any batch script. Make a backup of your original files. File > Batch Conversion / Rename And in Advanced options, you can choose to create subfolders. ...


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The only requirement for cover image is that your editor/publisher/cover designer like it. You should talk to them about expectations in terms of resolution, file format and such. Modern iPhones have very high-quality cameras compared to old digital cameras. And even those were good enough to make high-quality prints. For example, Ken Rockwell sold some ...


1

What aspect ratio to use when cropping depends on how you will use the final image. If images will be viewed only on screen or projected, use the screen or projector aspect ratio. Newer screens are usually 16:9. However, 8:5, 4:3, and 5:4 are also possible. If images will be printed, use the print aspect ratio. Aspect ratios include 3:2, 7:5, 5:4, 14:11, 6:...


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I am going to steal @osullic comment. If so, I have used VisiPics (on Windows) to do what you want. I have tested it a bit and it is doing a decent job. It is a really small application for windows. It can be improved a lot, but it works. It marks as green if it feels it is an exact duplicate, and some other colors like orange if it is just similar. ...


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