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14

Use the "Export..." option on the File menu. .xcf is GIMP's native format, similar to how Photoshop uses .psd files, and stores all the information (layers and the like) GIMP needs to edit files in the future. It's possibly worth noting this is a change from GIMP 2.6 and earlier, where the "Save..." menu option could be used to save to formats other than ....


12

Gimp doesn't have an Exposure setting like that, which is kind of a lacking point, but on the other hand easily worked-around by using the curves tool instead. It appears that recently, the trend in Gimp has been to focus the software as more a graphics design and image manipulation tool rather than photo post-processing software. That's a bit too bad for us ...


9

One technique often used to deal with those "shiny spots" as well as many other skin blemishes is called frequency separation. From The Ultimate Guide To The Frequency Separation Technique: Frequency Separation technique is virtually a process of decomposing of the image data into spatial frequencies, so that we can edit image details in the different ...


9

This is not about blending modes. It is about masks. These are my source files. Convert the girl into a grayscale image. The Photo can stay as RGB color image. Open the Photo and duplicate the layer. Let's call this Photo. Using curves, convert the background layer to flat white. (Not the new layer) Open the Girl's photo and invert it using curves. Copy ...


9

You say: When I select the Perspective tool and click anywhere in the canvas, the grid appears, already scaled to just the subject Emphasis added, because that's important. This is not the normal behavior of the perspective tool. Normally, if you just click, the grid will cover the entire image. It sounds like you have your subject pre-selected. You don'...


9

I assume you have a gradient in overall brightness due to unevben lighting. If that's the case, what you could do is to duplicate the layer with the image and apply the best correction to each part of the image on a different layer: curves for contrast, color balance or desaturate for white balancing. Then, using layer masks you can paint each region with ...


8

Of course I don't know. :) However the most common causes for these things are: RAW is "softer" The RAW image isn't 'softer' - JPEG image is doctored in-camera usually with quite aggressive sharpening. Especially on entry-level cameras this sharpening is 'yelling' sometimes and can cause artifacts Besides sharpening, JPEGs usually have in camera some ...


8

Open both photos individually (ie in different windows/tabs). Select all and copy one photo, then on the other photo "Paste as -> New layer" This pastes one photo over the other. If the sizes don't match up, you can resize one layer at a time with Layer -> Scale layer. Resize the larger layer down. You can move a layer around with the move tool in the ...


8

Although I am not a Gimp User, but the process I use in Photoshop will most likely be very similar and it should not take more than 5 minutes to reach a satisfactory result. I will start with the Clock first COPY VIA NEW LAYER, the bottom half of the clock FLIP IT HORIZONTAL to cover the top part of the clock SKEW, DISTORT and WARP this Layer until it ...


7

The gimp docs, youtube and various gimp tutorial websites already mentioned in the comments are invaluable. I have found that I made the most progress when I tackled photos that I wanted to edit. Whether it was an event you attended, a holiday, a topic, subject or chosen destination that you had in mind (instagram, etc), start with some photos and experiment ...


7

Actually it's very simple. If you open the Histogram tab, there are some basic statistics about the color values, such as mean, standard deviation and median. Depending on the selected tab (RGB, Red, Green, Blue, Value) you'll get different statistics. If you want to know the average color, take the Mean from the three separate channel histograms and enter ...


7

A better way to align images is by using the align_image_stack program, which is part of the free of charge Hugin panorama stitcher program. To align images, you can copy the align_image_stack.exe file to some directory where you put your images im1.tif, im2.tif, etc. You then open a command prompt and type the command: align_image_stack -a al -t 0.3 -c 20 ...


7

In the tool options for the perspective tool, under "Guides", you can select "No guides". There are other options, as well, for a sparser grid, etc.


7

All of the example photos could have been made without any selective processing with regard to color temperature/white balance. They all look like they were made with several different types of light sources in the scene. If one light source is very orange and the other is very blue, the camera will see the difference much more so than our own eye/brain ...


7

That's because you inadvertently selected the "Perspective Clone" tool instead of "Perspective".


7

Two techniques: The old technique (Gimp or Photoshop) Duplicate your image Set the top layer to Grain extract Apply a Gaussian blur to the top layer, enough to make vignetting disappear, but before halos appear around bright objects. The result will have a mostly gray background so use Curves or else to restore the blackpoint and add a bit of contrast. A ...


6

This would seem to be this acknowledged bug in GIMP; that bug has itself has been closed as a duplicate of this bug, which has been fixed in the development ("master") builds of GIMP by a complete rewrite of the metadata handling. The question I'd more be asking here is why Partha's rebuild mentioned in MBraedley's answer fixes the problem, rather than why ...


6

Darktable can remove chromatic aberrations if you are shooting raw. Your example image is a JPEG so I can't demonstrate how it works with that, but above is a screenshot of it removing the chromatic aberrations from a photo of a table lamp. In Darktable this is done with the 'Chromatic aberrations' module available in the right pane, part of the correction ...


6

I could come up with the following using Gimp: As you can see, I only removed the reflection at the word "Erkner". You would probably get better results using a RAW version of the photo and by spending some more time. Here is what I did: Open the photo in Gimp and create a duplicate Create a layer mask on the duplicate layer. Fill this layer mask ...


5

There are a few ways to do that. With the selection tool: First select your subject as usual (around the "clear image" part) Enlarge your selection by half the width of your "fuzzy border" with Select->Grow (so if you want, let's say 50 pixels of fuzzy, grow the selection of 25 pixels) Smooth the selection with Select->Feather for the same amount of pixels ...


5

I just made a retinex filter for Photoshop and similar: www.russellcottrell.com/photo/Retinex.asp It is a little different from the Gimp/ImageJ plugins. I tried to make it easier to understand, and included offset as well as gain. The “Level” control seems to be aimed at extracting detail from CT scans and so forth, not general photography, so I ...


5

There are some books about Gimp but as you've discovered, not nearly as many as about other programmes, and particularly Photoshop. However, as @Morpho has suggested, searching online is a very useful option here; there are many many text and video tutorials out there. The way I am learning Gimp is by tackling projects. Start with something you want to do, ...


5

Resize the image to 1x1 and see the color of the pixel you get. :)


5

What you are seeing in your example is not random noise. It is what is referred to as compression artifacts and is what happens when an image is compressed too much to make the file size smaller. Instead of trying to use noise removal, simply use a levels or curves layer. Or even try just boosting the contrast. You have a white background and dark text ...


5

That is not an effect. That is a trend. The trend is to use complementary colors, and there is not much room to choose from. It is either green to magenta, yellow to blue or red to cyan. In reality that is an orange to blue color grading trend. In movies it is called color grading, and this specific combination is based on some color theory principles of ...


5

I don't know how you added the exif data, but it could very well be that the application you used for this recompressed the file, and not with jpeg compression. Windows explorer recompresses a jpeg-tiff as LZW if you edit the metadata, you can see that in the file properties/details tab. Anyway, if you don't like the size of a jpeg exported from a raw file, ...


5

After loading the image, Gimp is just working with the grid of pixels, which now include noise/artifacts from that first save (as well as noise/artifacts from the original sensor and any processing done in-camera). When you go to save in Gimp, you're selecting how much more degradation you're willing to allow in saving the current batch of pixels (or to put ...


4

Adding some info to Akram's answer. You could use try some of the filters from G'mic (a "plugin pack" for the Gimp which has a lot more filters than just noise removal ones). Here's its website and download page. For a tutorial: Noise reduction with G'Mic . An excerpt: Anisotropic Smoothing is the best solution for pure noise reduction, it can be found ...


4

In Gimp, in the colors menu, go to components and disassemble them. (Frankly, I do not know the exact wording of the menu items in Gimp's English version). Next you are asked how, go for RGB then. Now what used to be color channels are b&w layers. You can work with each layer and then re-assemble the image.


4

How about GIMP? It should be there under filters. In 2.8 it is the IWarp filter under the Distort section. There is also a Warp filter under the Map section, depending on which type you are looking for. Update: If you are simply looking for a more user friendly implementation, then you are unlikely to find anything that matches Photoshop for less than ...


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