6

With a grain focuser, compose with the lens wide open. Now stop down to the aperture you will be using. Now use the grain focuser. It is likely that you are focusing wide open, it is likely that the focus is shifting as you stop down. This is not uncommon. Also, check and see which is sharper, grain focuser on easel, no paper on the easel or, sacrificial ...


5

Using an ND filter is the best option however, if this lash-up is for black & white printing, you can install a common lamp dimming switch. Only do this if the lamp operate at line voltage and only if the lamp is the only thing on that circuit.


4

The amount of light required to achieve the same exposure is proportional to the print area. That is the same as saying it goes with the square of the linear dimension. This is a approximation that is reasonably valid once the print is a few times larger than the negative. Let's say your example with a height of 8 results in a 8 x 12 print area. Now you ...


4

I think you are omitting the decimal point. I think the max setting is 1.70. The starting filter pack is a variable based on the red, green, and blue emulsion speeds. That being said: The average setting is 0.00 cyan 0.50 magenta 0.80 Yellow. Higher cyan adds red. Lower cyan add cyan. Higher magenta adds green. Lower magenta adds magenta. Higher yellow ...


4

I think using a bath tub for development is a bad idea. you won't be able to clean the bathtub perfectly, after some time you will have some stains in hard to clean areas as far as I know the particular benzene derivative contained in Rodinal is not known as carcinogen, but many similar chemicals are and I would not expose naked bodies of innocent people ...


4

If this is a condenser enlarger, likely it has two large condensing lenses situated between the lamp and the negative. These are plano-convex lenses. Make sure the plano sides face the lens and the lamp i.e. the two convex sides face each other. Also check the location of the condensers. If it is adjustable to accommodate smaller negatives, it could be too ...


4

To achieve an equitable color balance, it is necessary to present the paper with a spot-on mix of red, green and blue exposing light energy sourced from the projected image of the negative. If the exposing light mix be biased as to color or intensity, substandard print results. Now the vast majority of images contain substantial neutral areas, we are ...


4

Short answer: No, you do not need to buy filters. Long answer: Unless you already have a dichroic head head with built in filters, you may want to go ahead and buy the Ilford filter pack anyway if you want to make use of the contrast control. [Multigrade paper is usable without filters. The filters just give you more control/choices from the same paper ...


3

The best way of digitizing this particular image turned out to not be scanning at all. So here's the answer for if someone finds themself with the same questions I had: For some photos (like this one) you can obtain better results by using a stand and a professional camera in a photo studio to make a photo of the photo. After that, you can sharpen the image ...


3

Film photography embraces the use of chemicals. For the most part, the chemicals we use are benign; otherwise the darkrooms of the world would be labeled as a hazardous workplace. Not to say there is absolutely no danger as the potential to mishandle chemicals is with us always. There are a plethora of developer formulas, all have advantages and ...


3

Several comments on your idea: in an ideal setup you should have zero initial vibrations - the timer and enlarger are connected only electronically. Your pressing of a switch (or foot pedal in some cases) should not have any impact. If it does stabilize your enlarger - a good idea is fixing your center column to the wall. by setting too narrow aperture on ...


2

I have some high-quality RAW files. This is important. Let us move on. I need to have them printable at about twice the size I get with the ppi set to 240. I guess the 240 ppi is a preset of the camera... Well, you can modify that value to whatever value you need. Normal people, won't see a difference on a 100ppi photo and a 200ppi at 30cm except in ...


2

I believe the D2 is bolted to its base so you can detach it. Depending on the counter or surface you are using you could bolt it directly to the counter. ( that is what i would do ) You could replace the base with a larger board if you wanted it to be mobile on your counter top. I would use at least 3/4 cabinet grade plywood and sand it smooth round over ...


2

Simply put; just like the there is a difference between a Volkswagen beetle and a Porsche 911, they both get you from point A to B, there is difference between basic and advanced. One is more enjoyable and efficient. Enlarging easels are more than just a board, they have a fixed or adjustable boarder for cropping your photo ( cropping frame.) This also ...


2

So I've figured out both issues. The short answer is yes, this enlarger really will work for 4x5. The longer answer: Lens length: Omega D2 enlargers require you to change the length of your lens cone with the length of your lens. This is why I can't focus with the 180mm lens, since I have a 2 3/4" length lens cone, which works for my 135mm lens. Solution: ...


2

As a rule-of-thumb the focal length lens mounted should be equal to greater than the diagonal measure of the negative to be printed. For the 4X5 negative this works out to 6.4 inches = 160mm (rounded). Think about buying a shorter enlarger lens. In the meantime, you can mount a camera close-up lens to the 180mm. Such a lens will effectively shorten the ...


2

When I had this problem a while back I solved it by installing a weaker lamp into my enlarger - 75W instead of 150W it came with. I am not sure if it is an option with Omega D2, but it surely is less hassle than ND filters.


2

It was long time since I used enlarger, but I am pretty sure you can put neutral density filter (ND filter) into the filter drawer. ND filter is a piece of material that absorbs equally all parts of spectrum, thus attenuating your light source without changing it's color. This thread seems to discuss options, and also there is this page about how to work ...


2

The most likely culprit is the lens. Most Wollensacks (this was a US brand with little presence in Europe, where I am based, so I am going by the specs; you might want to double check) were 4 element Tessar types, and these suffer from corner issues. Consider a 6 element lens (Componon S, Rodagon and El Nikor have all good reputation and need not be ...


2

Why the past tense? B&W enlargers are alive and kicking to this day :) A couple comments: the idea behind enlargers is Camera Obscura, which has been around since ever, certainly since European Renaissance. similarly lantern slides have been around for longer than photography. special lens for enlarging are yet more recent innovation; in the past ...


2

File size isn't really the issue here, although it's one of the factors. Your camera has a normal resolution of 5184 × 3456 pixels. It can produce JPEG files smaller than that, but the full size is the default. It also has various levels of JPEG compression, called "normal" and "fine". It will depend on the detail in your picture, but from this review I ...


2

You should always use RAW mode for this kind of work. RAW mode will give you the maximum quality that a digital camera is capable of. The T3i's native resolution of 5184 x 3456 will give a horizontal resolution of 54 pixels per inch when blown up to 8' x 5', and this is easily good enough for a large poster (although it will be less if you crop).


2

If you crop a photo, you will lose resolution by definition. But there are some promising new programs and algorithms out there, that can upscale a image to higher resolutions. BUT: there will never pop up new details, like some criminal investigations tv series show. If a detail in the photo is not good visible, it will also be not good visible in an ...


2

You can't improve resolution beyond what was captured when the photo was taken. Any processing you can do would just be to alter the look a little, which may improve apparent sharpness or reduce apparent noise but won't actually enhance the detail in the way that you could if you had more resolution from the start. Assuming that it was a decent modern ...


2

Checking the specifications, the Beseler 23C-iii-XL Variable Contrast Black & White, sports a diffusion lamphouse and its adjustable grade 0 thru grade +5. I think you will find the diffusion lamphouse desirable as opposed to a condenser design. The diffusion design suppresses dust spots greatly reducing spotting time. Plus this design is favored by ...


2

An enlarger lens is optimized to image a flat object (negative/slide) and project its image on flat photo paper. A camera lens is optimized to image a 3D world (objects at different distances) and project these images on a flat surface (film or digital sensor). Enlarger lenses although slightly compromised will image OK. This will be dependent on how the ...


2

Variable contrast photo paper sports two paper emulsions. One has hard, the other soft contrast. When exposed using a tungsten , unfiltered lamp, this paper delivers a normal grade 2 contrast. A set of variable contrast filters are currently being sold via Ebay for cheap. These are filter sets of various strength magenta and yellow filters. Higher contrast ...


1

What size prints now? IMO, this 30x40 inch from a small print is a seriously doomed effort. Print emulsion is only designed to be the "final viewing resolution" (only sufficient resolution that the eye can see), and are NOT designed to be enlarged more. In contrast, film is designed to be high resolution, designed to be enlarged, but prints are not. If you ...


1

I would ask the lab if they offer a scanning service. You want to make a high resolution scan of the print, ensuring it is as clean as possible so that you don't enlarge any dust specks.


1

The principles of a photographic enlarger have changed very little if at all since their inception. There is a light source, a carrier to hold the negative, a lens, and base board to hold the the paper (or other material coated with photosensitive chemicals). Allen Marcus provided the info for the reflected light source so i will limit my description to ...


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