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13

Privacy reasons are certainly the main concern. The second concern is bandwidth. Stripping EXIF information makes images considerably lighter at web-sizes. This makes it a better experience of 99% of viewers who do not care about how the image was made. Lastly, the information may not exist. A lot of images on the web are composites, be it HDR/Exposure ...


11

Google Reverse Image search does wonders and so does TinEye to find out where your photos have been posted. Both are very useful!


11

sRGB is the STANDARD So stick with sRGB, it is the STANDARD for web content. I fail to see any reasons to not use Adobe RGB when it comes to JPEG files whatever you are posting them on web sites or simply looking at them in your PC... The REASON is as stated: sRGB is the DEFAULT STANDARD for all web content, not AdobeRGB. Don't use AdobeRGB for web ...


10

If you can set up your Raspberry Pi to listen on WiFi, my suggestion is as follows: Install imagemagick on the Pi to get the convert utility. Set up the Pi with an SSID and NFS/SMB/whatever shared folder to receive the images. Script something in bash like for x in *.jpg; do convert -resize 50% $x; done. You can poll the folder on the Pi for changes, too, ...


9

If you want well-known masters of photography, then here are two sites. Profotos has a lot of narrative about the photographers, with links to photographs. Masters of Photography has a lot of images, but the site is littered with pop-up ads, so may put you off Atget Photography is a good combination of image galleries and short biographies on a number of ...


9

Privacy and default export settings (like Itai said) do play an important role but there's another factor A photographer may research a location, travel there in the right time of year, wake up at unreasonable hours to get there on time for sunrise - again and again and again waiting for the perfect weather, obsess about the exact camera location and take ...


8

From their relevant Support page: width 880px for photos in landscape orientation, height 900px for images in portrait orientation. Even when you submit your images in that size, they will still get resized for display in thumbnails, and on iOS devices. Oh, and your carefully prepared originals in correct size are still recompressed into smaller files. The ...


8

Look at the channel for weather here. I get an email to my phone for various weather presets I made. https://ifttt.com


8

Yes, there is a breathtaking amount of copyright infringement going on on the internet. The thing is: where it concerns images, most of it happens with the implicit approval of the copyright holders, who basically like to have their stuff shared and pinned and retweeted all over the internet (at least by consumers) because that gets them attention and ...


7

I don't think the question, "is .photography currently a good choice for a portfolio website" is the right question to ask. In my opinion, you should be asking if MoritzLost.photography (as an example) is the right brand for you. If the brand you present (content and portfolio) is good, then it will work for you. If your brand is mediocre, then it probably ...


7

Bottom line is: you can't protect against this. If the images are shown on the screen, they are in the memory of the client computer and can be extracted one way or another. You can make this slightly harder, for example by capturing right-clicks in the client's browser but that's only a small hurdle for people to jump over - they can either install a ...


5

Photos are displayed at 2048px on their longest edge. Have a read on 500px support page for more details.


5

1x is known for strict selection of photos. Feature Shoot is a blog with frequent articles on interesting photographers, mostly consisting of photos, but often also featuring a short interview.


5

I usually do something like the following (in bash): original=something.tif reduced=${original%.tif}.jpg options="-resize 720 -auto-orient -strip -unsharp 3x1+0.5 -quality 85" convert $original $options $reduced -auto-orient will get the correct orientation if the camera has a gravity sensor, -strip will remove the metadata and the thumbnail (usually ...


5

At least according to Wikipedia, these types of sites can be referred to as geolocation-oriented photo sharing sites. Here is the list of what I use: Flickr Map Google Maps(Click on "Photos" feature) Photosynth on Bing Maps(I click into it from the PS site) Google Earth Panoramio(The same as the two above) - More info at StackOverFlow Stuck On Earth(iPad) ...


5

No. Photostream is a view of all photographs in the account. Flickr offers Albums, Galleries, and Collections, where you can arrange groups of photographs together as you'd like, but the photostream (and once it comes out of beta, the Camera Roll) will, according to Flickr staff comments, always be the full view of any photographs set to be publicly ...


5

I. Preparations. a) The first rule. If you do not want anyone to use your photos, do not publish them. Once they are published they can be "pirated" in some way or another. b) Be very clear on the licence of your photos. Probably you can licence some under a creative commons one, or on the contrary, state that you can not use them in anyway without a fee ...


5

What about displaying a low-quality and low-resolution thumbnail, to advertise what image they are about to pay for; and a small detail in full resolution and final quality, to advertise what quality they are about to pay for?


4

First, you should be aware that most wide screen laptops are not 16:9 - they are made with the screen shorter to reduce size and cost, for example, you said your monitor is 1600x700 - you don't need too much math to work out this is 16:7 and not 16:9. Now that we got that out of the way it's actually easy to make a picture into a desktop background: First, ...


4

Have a look at Pwinty http://www.pwinty.com . It's a nice simple API for ordering photos - and you don't need users to leave your site like the other options suggested. they offer world wide shipping. I don't think Peecho offers much in the way of prints and posters and doesnt't look like fotomoto offers what you want either


4

I'd like to chime in, albiet a bit late. Sharpening is not a one-size-fits-all thing. In an ideal world, you would sharpen each image individually for optimal results. This isn't an ideal world and most people who process volumes of images want some compromise setting that gives a good effect most of the time. Rule of thumb 1: Never sharpen at other than ...


4

Photo Mechanic is one of the most widely used products by photojournalists due to the speed you can read your cards, scan thumbnails, add metatdata and upload images. It's a standalone program which runs on Mac and Windows - I don't think there's a version for Linux. If you have a Eye-Fi card, Photo Mechanic can monitor folders for new files as you shoot ...


4

Just go to flickr and look for creative commons licensed shots that allow commercial use. You'll find some that require attribution. So use and correctly give the attribution.


4

While the main page isn't a good place for critique since it's a Q/A site, the chat is reasonably active and is a great place for asking for critiques and more discussion oriented questions that don't fit on the main site.


4

Not all browsers support colour management, and if they don't, they'll act like the images are encoded in sRGB. Since sRGB is also the default for images without an embedded profile, this is the safest option for images intended to be viewed via web browser. It doesn't make much of a difference whether you embed sRGB or no profile at all. PS does have an ...


3

You may want to check http://www.peecho.com http://www.fotomoto.com Both of them allow ordering prints via their API. Hopefully this will work for you.


3

500 Photographers Blog! What genre of photography do you like? There are SO many photographers out there. Also, visit your local art school, and go to their library, visit photography section, get some coffee and get going...


3

1x.com is another alternative. It's a bit more exclusive - each image must be approved - but you can get more in-depth critique than at most sites (where you get mostly "nice shot" or "love this!"). I don't know how well-known it is, and you can't just upload all your stuff there, as it has to be approved, but worth a look.


3

You may want to look at 500px.com as far as I know you can link your domain to it. Another option may be a wordpress.com hosted blog with a portfolio/photoblog template. You can link a domain name to that and you can customize the themes to a certain extent.


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