5

dupeGuru Picture Edition is a customisable duplicate image finder for Windows, Mac OS X and Linux. There's a few versions of dupeGuru (standard, music & picture editions), and the picture edition allows you to find visually similar images via a bitmap blocking comparison algorithm, among other methods (like EXIF original image timestamp, or the files ...


5

Allright, so here's the good workaround. There's no way to find b&w photos, but you can make a "smart collection". And there is choice for colorspace. I had to choose "grayscale" for tiff files and "Linear Raw" for dng files. See settings of my fiter: And voila! all and only b&w files you see!


4

The closest app which satisfies that list of criteria is Microsoft Windows Photo Gallery. It is a free application which supports RAW files (providing the codec is installed.) Tagging can be done by location and built in face detection. While the metadata is not stored in a separate file it uses the (formerly Adobe specific) XMP metadata system, which ...


4

If at least some cataloging information is written to the image, then you can reconnect a file to your database. In principle this can be a single unique ID. This saves you from: You moved or renamed an image file. If you can write more info into the file -- keywords, captions -- then you are saved from: Your database is corrupted. You upgraded your ...


4

I think you have three options here, given your desired workflow: A. Before importing, delete the images you don't want to keep from the card, either in-camera or via a photo viewer on your computer. This makes me a little bit squeamish, not because this is likely to cause bugs or make the card go bad but because there's a lot of room for human error and ...


4

Yes, it is. Lightroom can do all the things you asked for (and more). The process should be non-destructive and the images unchanged unless I explicitly allow this (see points below). Lightroom does this. All the adjustments you make are stored in the Lightroom database, the original RAW files are never touched in any way (though you can chose to convert ...


3

Hashes are actually the key to doing this and getting it right. If you're up to getting your hands a little dirty, this would be an easy effort as a shell script: Generate a list of hashes of every file in your master archive. Call this list "MA ("master archive"). Generate a two-field list of hashes and paths to every file in your other archives. Cal ...


3

From what you describe I do not believe Lightroom has an exact equivalent. Find Photos in Lightroom I understand why someone might ask the question that you have and desire that view. It is the standard view for graphical operating system folders such as Windows or OS X. The thing is when you have 10's of thousands of images and hundreds or thousands of ...


3

Noticed the same issue, here's what I do: At the lightroom import screen, sort by date then click uncheck all. Now scroll to the first image in the current import and click on the image. Scroll to the last image in the current import and Shift-Click on the image. This will select all the images in between. Check the import check box on one image, this will ...


3

This seems to be a highly polarizing thing. While I would never choose a software that modifies my images in any way, I know people who would not choose one that would not store the metadata in files! The issue is that if the metadata is external than files are not touched. On my system, images are mounted on a read-only partition so I guarantee that no ...


3

Personally, I use Lightroom for most of my cataloging. Between the ability to handle RAW files, keyword tag and rate images, change EXIF information in bulk, create online galleries and edit images in a non-destructive manner, Lightroom is really a great value for the money and I've used it for maintaining catalogs with thousands of photos taking 100 ...


3

Dropbox or Google Drive is probably the easiest. I'd go with Dropbox personally. I've seen it used by dozens of photographers for this sort of thing. You give everyone access to a specific folder and they drop the pictures in when they're done. Those pictures will sync to your computer's copy of the folder. That's not the most secure solution, but it is the ...


3

There is an element of XY problem in the question. What you probably want is not organizing photos efficiently, but finding photos efficiently. Framed that way, deduplication has approximately zero benefit (if you're out of disk space a bigger disk is a better answer). Framed as improving the finding of photos, any first step is pretty much a step in the ...


2

First, understand that Lightroom does not store images in its catalog, but instead simply records a location pointer. So organizing within Lightroom is very powerful, if you take advantage of the power. But you have to let go of thinking about organization equalling folders on a hard drive. To answer your question: No Lightroom does not allow you to ...


2

I solve this problem with photo management software. There's many options from cheap/free & simple ones like Picasa, iPhoto, ACDSee, etc up to the more advanced like Lightroom and Aperture (this is by no means a complete list!). This type of software allows you to track additional data relating to your photos, both individually and as groups, as well as ...


2

digikam (linux, windows and mac) has a sidebar titled versions The Versions tab shows the history and the saved versions of a photograph. With the three buttons in the top right corner you can choose between a simple list of the saved versions, a tree view and a combined list that shows the versions together with the actions performed with the selected ...


2

Digikam has an SQLite database. I am not an SQL expert, but such databases allow for powerful search operations. While I do not have a direct answer, I am hoping the following avenues of research will be helpful. First start with Digikam's advanced search feature. Start with Browse->Search and activate the "Advanced Search ..." menu. Select the criteria ...


2

All modern and mature photo management programs stores information in their own library files. And this is not bad, because after indexing your terabytes of photos you can quickly find the right photos almost instantly. Another question is whether they support writing this information into image metadata. For Mac OS a good choise and replacement for ...


2

First off, let me start by saying you're not going to like the answer very much... In terms of commercial software, all you really have available is AfterShot. It does do tagging and organizing quite well, though, if you learn how to use it. Make sure you realize you can set up a bunch of tags in use them in the "keyword sets" dialog on the right hand ...


2

Is there something that Lr's existing web publishing module can't handle? It's kinda basic, and you'd have to work out access control via your chosen web construction software, but it just works. There are also WordPress/LR solutions; see http://apps.meow.fr/wplr-sync/ eg. Or perhaps this: http://terrywhite.com/built-photography-website-lightroom-ttg/


2

In my experience, Lightroom comes closest to this ideal. It is not exactly the use case you mention, as the different services all have different capabilities and different methods. Lightroom allows you to manage your local collection with ease; in fact I would argue that it is among the best tools around for managing your local collection. In its recent ...


2

The question asks for a way to find RAW+JPEGs in Lightroom, but I couldn't find a way. So I had to settle for a script, in Ruby. This finds files that exist in multiple formats. That is, files with the same name and location but different extensions: require 'set' list = Dir['**/*.*'] set = Set.new dupes = Set.new for path in list down = path....


2

Microsoft OneDrive (formerly SkyDrive) is a cloud service that should suit your needs. If you are a Windows user, you can have it integrated to the Windows Explorer and use this program as an uploader. Drag&drop to a web browser window is another option. It does support the directory structure. (I'm not sure about the maximum depth though.)


2

darktable has both a CLI and Lua scripting.


2

From the manual, page 10: Phocus primarily fully supports Hasselblad 3FR and 3F files with more limited support for other format files. This is true for most RAW converters. Some do try to offer some/all options to JPEG as well, but since they lack the information that RAW files still have, it is a different algorithm that has to interpolate the ...


2

I am going to steal @osullic comment. If so, I have used VisiPics (on Windows) to do what you want. I have tested it a bit and it is doing a decent job. It is a really small application for windows. It can be improved a lot, but it works. It marks as green if it feels it is an exact duplicate, and some other colors like orange if it is just similar. ...


2

Ok, this may not be the answer you're looking for, but my advice would be to use standard tools that come with the operating system. For example, MS-DOS was released about 40 years ago and supported the concept of a file. Today, its successor, Microsoft Windows supports too the concept of a file. I bet whatever operating system you're using in 50 years time ...


2

Partial answer as well, but perhaps helpful. Now I understand your current issue as: you have multiple downscaled versions of an image, but cannot find the original image anymore. Software that can look for visual duplicates of photos might be a solution. This previous question has more information on that. Future Manual For the future, if you want to stick ...


1

Without a person doing a visual presorting or prebinning of similar files together to start with, what you are asking for is an incredibly computationally intensive process. If you are not adverse to some programming (even scripting programming, such as Python), take a look at ImageMagick command-line tools, especially the ImageMagick compare command. It ...


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