12

If you are looking for something closer in spirit to Aperture or Lightroom, consider Darktable. Open source, all that. http://www.darktable.org/ Its not as polished as Aperture or Lightroom, but it works, and is free. It has an active development group, and it gets better all the time.


6

I also use several passes, but slightly different from what MikeW described in his answer. First pass: I reject the photos that are out of focus, have undesired motion blur, wrong exposure, etc., and, at the same time, pick photos which look great. At this state, I don't zoom in to look at details. When shooting in burst, I skip the range of similar photos ...


5

I don't see why you couldn't use Publish Services for this. If you are in the Library module, it is on the left pane all the way at the bottom. Simply setup a new Publish Services to your hard drive, and select the criteria that you would like to use, such as Photos Edited today with 5 Stars. Once you have that setup, you can really extend the functionality ...


5

Allright, so here's the good workaround. There's no way to find b&w photos, but you can make a "smart collection". And there is choice for colorspace. I had to choose "grayscale" for tiff files and "Linear Raw" for dng files. See settings of my fiter: And voila! all and only b&w files you see!


4

If you are looking for a free option Picasa is probably your best bet. You can match it up with Gimp to do some more advanced editing. The preferred solution by many is Adobe Lightroom, which you can find on sale for around $130USD right now I believe. Depending on the camera that you bought, you likely received a disc of software with it that may even ...


4

dupeGuru Picture Edition is a customisable duplicate image finder for Windows, Mac OS X and Linux. There's a few versions of dupeGuru (standard, music & picture editions), and the picture edition allows you to find visually similar images via a bitmap blocking comparison algorithm, among other methods (like EXIF original image timestamp, or the files ...


4

For Linux, try FSlint. It's a bit slow, but it will definitely find duplicates.


4

No, Lightroom doesn't offer the native ability to filter all printed/exported images. For printed images your current system seems to be the best solution although depending on your workflow using publish services may offer a better solution for keeping track of exported images.


4

I use pick most of the time and only reject for seriously bad exposure or blur. Sometimes I delete rejects from HDD on the stop (like if the flash didn't work). I pick and reject on my first pass. I typically cover bands, events and model shoots, so sometimes a lot of sharp keepers, sometimes not. Depends on conditions, lens, and so on. [ If I like one ...


4

One of the simplest solutions would be to install the Gallery on the Synology server. It is a web based gallery software. It is listed on Synology list of Gallery software and it a rather proven solution. Since it is listed on the Synology list, it is actually tested by the Synology team. There are more Gallery software listed there, but I have no personal ...


4

The closest app which satisfies that list of criteria is Microsoft Windows Photo Gallery. It is a free application which supports RAW files (providing the codec is installed.) Tagging can be done by location and built in face detection. While the metadata is not stored in a separate file it uses the (formerly Adobe specific) XMP metadata system, which ...


4

If at least some cataloging information is written to the image, then you can reconnect a file to your database. In principle this can be a single unique ID. This saves you from: You moved or renamed an image file. If you can write more info into the file -- keywords, captions -- then you are saved from: Your database is corrupted. You upgraded your ...


4

I think you have three options here, given your desired workflow: A. Before importing, delete the images you don't want to keep from the card, either in-camera or via a photo viewer on your computer. This makes me a little bit squeamish, not because this is likely to cause bugs or make the card go bad but because there's a lot of room for human error and ...


4

Yes, it is. Lightroom can do all the things you asked for (and more). The process should be non-destructive and the images unchanged unless I explicitly allow this (see points below). Lightroom does this. All the adjustments you make are stored in the Lightroom database, the original RAW files are never touched in any way (though you can chose to convert ...


3

If you have the ability to run a webserver with php on Linux, then Gallery is one of the best options for web gallery. You can also use Lightroom to build HTML galleries. For both images and video, using a DLNA server is a great option, as you can then use PS3, BluRay, Boxee or other similar viewer to see images and movies. I have a WD Live drive that has ...


3

Try Jeffrey Friedl's Tree Publisher Plugin. It's gives you a publish service that will preserve your tree structure. You can set it up using Smart Collection rules to have it export a subset of your photos. In your specific case, you could have a rule that selects folders with "good" in the name. Two things it won't do: I don't believe it will handle ...


3

You can do this simply with total commander. Just put all photos in one folder. Then sort them by date (click on header of Date column), or you can do it later in rename tool. Now select all files and use Batch rename tool (menu Files -> Multi-Rename Tool ... Ctrl+M). You can write whatever name you want. For example: Ireland_[C], where [C] is counter. You ...


3

Lightroom is my tool of choice for this. If you do a search on 'manage' or digital manage, you will get scores of discussion on Photo.SE regarding this. Of course, LR has the benefit of being a development tool and a management tool. For me the management tool has the added value of removing the file name and location from the equation. No longer do I need ...


3

If I understand you correctly, you have one image you want to keep, but it's not the 'original image', it's one of the virtual copies. Not a problem. In the Library module, click on the VC you want to keep and go to Photo/Set Copy as Master. Done.


3

Personally, I use Lightroom for most of my cataloging. Between the ability to handle RAW files, keyword tag and rate images, change EXIF information in bulk, create online galleries and edit images in a non-destructive manner, Lightroom is really a great value for the money and I've used it for maintaining catalogs with thousands of photos taking 100 ...


3

This seems to be a highly polarizing thing. While I would never choose a software that modifies my images in any way, I know people who would not choose one that would not store the metadata in files! The issue is that if the metadata is external than files are not touched. On my system, images are mounted on a read-only partition so I guarantee that no ...


3

Noticed the same issue, here's what I do: At the lightroom import screen, sort by date then click uncheck all. Now scroll to the first image in the current import and click on the image. Scroll to the last image in the current import and Shift-Click on the image. This will select all the images in between. Check the import check box on one image, this will ...


3

From what you describe I do not believe Lightroom has an exact equivalent. Find Photos in Lightroom I understand why someone might ask the question that you have and desire that view. It is the standard view for graphical operating system folders such as Windows or OS X. The thing is when you have 10's of thousands of images and hundreds or thousands of ...


3

Dropbox or Google Drive is probably the easiest. I'd go with Dropbox personally. I've seen it used by dozens of photographers for this sort of thing. You give everyone access to a specific folder and they drop the pictures in when they're done. Those pictures will sync to your computer's copy of the folder. That's not the most secure solution, but it is the ...


2

I think if you're working professionally, leave the deleting until after the client has signed off. Yes, there may be some photos you will obviously never use but it's always good to stay safe and keep the ones that aren't total rejects. If you delete a photo that was only marginally unpleasant you can never get it back in case it's needed (whatever reason ...


2

I usually work by rejecting, in several passes. First eliminate ones that are out of focus and other technical problems. I keep an eye on the rest to get an idea of what the better shots are, but I don't make any picks yet. I might get rid of 20% in the first pass. Second pass, having had a quick look at all the images, I eliminate another 20-30% that are ...


2

Definitely have a look at The OpenPhoto Project. You can think of it as a modern version of Gallery. A sample site is at http://current.openphoto.me and you can find more information at http://theopenphotoproject.org. I'm the lead developer so you can ping me any questions at jaisen@openphoto.me. I'm positive that it'll meet the requirements you're looking ...


2

digikam (linux, windows and mac) has a sidebar titled versions The Versions tab shows the history and the saved versions of a photograph. With the three buttons in the top right corner you can choose between a simple list of the saved versions, a tree view and a combined list that shows the versions together with the actions performed with the selected ...


2

If you have a Mac this can easily be achieved in Aperture, I dont think you can do this in Lightroom. I think this is what you ment, if you don't have a Mac, you can do this with ACDSee on Windows, maybe Picasa but I'm not sure about that.


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