Hot answers tagged

54

It’s called an anti-rotation pin. This pin interfaces with most cine (motion picture) cameras. Cinematographic camera applications often involve panning the camera. Such activities can result is the camera slipping on its mount. A anti-rotation pin locks the camera and prevents unwanted gyrations. Additionally, on a film cine camera, to reload a fresh roll ...


39

A tripod can be unstable by: Having cheap leg fasteners / too heavy a load for the legs My first tripod ever was a hand-me-down Velbon that had seen some abuse. Even sporting just a 20D and 70-200 f/4 (~3.2lbs) if left alone, the legs would begin to collapse. Slowly, sure, but enough to not want to walk away or be able to do a long exposure. Poor ...


32

The mountain and the valley obviously are static -- even more from that distance. The clouds, however, move. If you chose a low ISO value, e.g., in the range of 50 to 100, the exposure time might be enough to get washy/faded/blurred clouds. If I calculated it correctly, an ISO value of 100 with the other settings (exluding shutter speed) staying the same ...


28

I haven't seen any camera that has a hole that the peg would fit into. Let me fix that for you. Here is the base of an old video camera of mine: The little hole is where the peg goes. If you don't have a camera base with a hole, you don't need the peg. If you do, you do. It stops the camera from rotating relative to the plate you clip to the tripod.


26

There are a number of good reasons for a center column. The first, and most obvious is that even if you've chosen a tripod that's sized for comfortable eye-level use without the center column extended, every once in a while you'll want some additional height, and on those occasions, the extra height may be worth the penalty you'll pay in stability. In this ...


26

Along with weighing down the tripod, using a cable to release the shutter will help reduce camera movement. Also, if you want to guarantee no mirror shake happens during the exposure, hold a black object in front of the lens while triggering the shot, then pull it away for the duration of your exposure.


25

There is a rule in photography: If you can use a tripod, do it. OK, I just made it up but let me tell you why it is a good idea: Stability: No matter how fast your shutter-speed is going to be, a good tripod can do better. There is a rule-of-thumb that says you need a certain shutter-speed (1/focal-length) get a sharp enough image but it does not guarantee ...


25

The traditional cheap solution is a bag of beans.


23

Looks like it's related to image stabilization as Tetsujin suggested. Managed to replicate the issue. Switched off the IS and the Ghosting went away. It is a new IS lens (Latest Sigma 105mm macro IS). Guess I just need to remember to switch it off in these circumstances. For those who are interested, here is the final shot


22

Mirror slap is an issue in "medium" long exposures - from 1/30 or so til about a second or two. Tripod shake is issue in "long" long exposures - from about a second upwards. For shooting stars you can safely forget about the mirror slap. It will last about a second of the four hours exposure. Nothing of importance will be captured in such a short time. ...


22

I have a nice heavy tripod and a cheap, light aluminum tripod. I hear a lot of people talking about wind and vibration, etc, and I think you're right - the environment makes a big difference. Landscapes with little to no wind are very forgiving. However, even little wind can go a long way and cause vibration and the type of vibration we're talking about ...


22

Sigma's product manual says: Please do not use Optical Stabilization in the following situations. When the lens is mounted on a tripod Bulb (long time exposure) As I understand it, the problem is as follows. Stabilization works by having some lens elements move around to correct for the the movement of the whole assembly. As Isaac Newton ...


21

Yes. The tripod thread is standard: 1/4-20, which means ¼", with 20 threads per inch. This is specified by ISO 1222:2010. I'm not willing to pay the $57 for my own copy, but I'm kind of curious, as wikipedia says that the current standard also allows 3/8-16 — apparently that's an older mostly-European standard. This is probably old-hat to aficionados of ...


21

In addition to @Itai's answer, I'd like to add, if you don't want to spend 1200$ on a tripod just to protect it from sands, you can use a little care, or on extreme situations, alternative DIY methods. I also wrecked a tripod (not totally wrecked, but the sands kind of jammed the levers on the legs) by using it near a beach on a windy day. The next time I ...


19

I'd like preface my answer with a note that a tripod is not only useful in conjunction with ND filters — it also improves the results from image stacking as well. By fixing the position of the camera, the tripod eliminates changes in perspective, which can occur through minor motion while hand-held shooting a sequence for image stacking. Aside from fixing ...


18

Carbon fiber can take quite a hell of a beating, both in terms of environment (water, sand, snow) and temperature. I've heard a lot of people discussing or complaining about how carbon fiber is susceptible to extreme cold, however I think most of it is hearsay and speculation. There are only a couple times when I've read something regarding carbon fiber ...


18

The only options are: Buy a better tripod/head with significant over-provisioning. (i.e. if your camera were to weigh 2kg, don't get a head for say up to 3kg but up to 10kg.) Shield the camera from the wind. (Anything that keeps the wind from hiting the camera - something along the lines of the "tents" people use at beaches.) Use a weight below the tripod - ...


18

Both of your tripod selections look good to me. If you can live within their limitations, they should work fine for you. However, both of them are large and heavy enough that they cannot be called "convenient." They're not the small but highly limited sort of tripod you can tuck into the corner of a camera bag. I find this sort of middle ground ...


17

Mirror slap will last some fraction of a second. This is completely irrelevant in a multi hour exposure. Weighing down your tripod is a good idea nonetheless, since movement from wind will be a bigger risk.


15

The rule of thumb is you can hand hold a 50mm lens at 1/50th second, or a 100mm at 1/100th second and have reasonable lack of camera shake. VR extends that a few stops. So it depends on the amount of light. In bright sunlight, at f/16 and a 35mm lens, you wouldn't need a tripod or VR. In low light, VR won't be enough, you'll need a tripod In between ...


14

Firstly I notice your aperture is set at 1.8. This will make DOF very narrow, making focusing very difficult. Also your camera is very good at higher iso, so try using 1600 / 3200 initially. Try setting the following. Use auto focus to focus on something with a defined edge (the tops of the trees?), then switch to manual to keep the focus. Use a higher iso, ...


14

Tripod selection comes down to a few different compromises. What is more important to you, the cost, tripod weight, or the stability of the tripod? It is a set of trade offs and you have to choose what is most important to you, or decide that you won't get the best of all three. General Considerations Stability/Capacity - Are you shooting with a small ...


14

May I ask how a tripod can be unstable? Unstable might be the wrong word to describe the major problem with tripods; unsteady might be a better choice. Tripods are quite stable in the sense that, absent a really strong wind or careless photographer, all three feet will generally stay on the ground. They don't rock like a four-legged table on uneven ground. ...


13

I can't think of any technical reason for this to be the case. Even assuming that he used the lens at 105mm, if he was more than 387 ft from the closest object in the frame, he could have focused at 750 feet and had everything in focus even at f/5.6, so f/22 was completely unnecessary unless intending to get the shutter speed longer. A faster shutter speed ...


13

For most people it is just a personal preference. Some say the flip locks are more bulky and can get snagged on objects. Some will tell you that one or the other is faster to set up and take down. I have both types(Manfrotto flip locks and Benro twist locks) and have no preference. I find them equally fast to set up and take down, and have never had a flip ...


13

Well, with regards to your (1)... You could carry a light tripod (or beanbag or any other way of stabilizing a camera) and use only a single ND filter instead of several stacked filters. With regard to (2), yes you could do that, but stacking a sequence of discrete single images will give you a result that contains several discrete non- or less-blurred ...


12

In addition to MikeW's answer, I would suggest a few other benefits that tripods provide for landscape photography. Often with landscape photography there is the desire to compose an image exactly and then wait for the light to be "right". With a tripod it's possible to set up in advance, and then wait for the sun to rise or set or for that shaft of light ...


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