13

Now I will tell you a real training exercise. Train yourself to hand-hold the camera with a steady and non-jerking stroke when pressing the shutter release. Place an operating flashlight on a book shelf or mantel, at eyelevel height. Mount a small mirror before the camera lens. Use masking tape. Assume a picture taking position. Adjust yourself and camera ...


10

This may not be a very elegant solution, it's more of a hack, but I once read a tip about searching for the sharpest picture out of a stack: look for the heavier files! I've used this method several times, and it works. From a technical standpoint, this makes sense because the JPEG algorithm will compress your RAW files a lot more when you take blurry shots;...


9

Of course the answer is, it depends. A common rule often mentioned is that to get sharp images hand held, you need a shutter speed that is 1/focal length used. When using this rule though you must also take your format or sensor size into account. Lucky for you, you do have a full frame(35mm) sensor so no factor is necessary. You must also consider if your ...


8

A tripod always matters. With a good tripod and head, a camera will always be more stable. There is a rule-of-thumb, which states that the shutter-speed should be faster than the reciprocal of the focal-length in 35mm-equivalent terms to get a sharp images while hand-holding. In the case of a 35mm lens on a full-frame camera, that should be 1/35s or ...


8

Yes, this precisely what Photoshop CC's Shake Reduction filter does. Adobe first publicly demonstrated their prototype feature at Adobe Max 2011. The crowd was pretty wowed by the demo. While it was demonstrated in 2011, Piccure actually introduced the feature before Adobe in 2013, as a plugin to Photoshop. See also: Adobe's help page for the Shake ...


7

Rather the contrary. Pixel density Of course, as you say, sometimes there is an issue with the sensor - but not directly related with 'more megapixels', but related with the actual pixel density (ie. number of pixels/sensor area). I don't know exactly any more which is the situation right now but it seems that 24 MP APS-C sensors have the biggest pixel ...


7

I don't think I've ever heard of it, and I've been reading about camera stabilization techniques since the 1980s. If I have ever heard of it, I have since forgotten it to the point that even this discussion does not jog a memory. Most instructionals emphasize holding the arms against the body (or other solid objects such as a wall, or a tree, etc.) so that ...


6

I don't know it by first hand, but I found out the following blog post. Apparently, Capture One Pro is able to find out the sharpest image in a sequence, as the following blurb points out: If you shoot a large quantity of images in a short period of time, for example with portrait or fashion work, it can often be time consuming to select the images with ...


6

There are many factors that will influence the answer to your question, and the answer can vary significantly from one photographer to the next. The angular relationships between Angle of View and Focal Length. For any given sensor (or film) size, a particular focal length will yield a specific Angle of View (AoV). This is most often expressed in degrees. A ...


5

Shooting multiple shots like this is certainly common, but it's not optimal. As your skills improve, you'd like to see your consistency improve, too. Shooting digitally, we're lucky that multiple shots cost next to nothing for us, but you want to move away from using that as a crutch. Instead, try to understand why you're seeing variation from shot-to-...


4

There's lots of good information in the other answers which we'll not repeat here, but one important thing that has been hinted at hasn't been explicitly mentioned: Pretty much all of the "rules of thumb" from the film era are based upon a presumption that the image will be printed no larger than 8x10 inches and viewed from a distance of about 10-12 inches ...


4

As a Gorillapod user (SLR version) with a small Nikon DSLR and Sony 5R, I noticed that the camera shake comes mainly from the tripod being less than ideally attached to the pole/branch/bar/whatever. This is not easily fixed, because most times the Gorillapod cannot be ideally set up with no camera shake (especially if you need to adjust it and recompose a ...


4

I am not familiar with that technique and to be honest, I don't recall any training or practice to help holding the camera steady. This is because of two factors: holding the camera correctly, and understanding the impact of shutter speed on motion. I suggest doing a google search on 'how to hold a camera', where you will be linked to many stories such as ...


4

You are able to use slower shutter speeds because you switched to a larger sensor. A given amount of movement is relatively smaller compared with a larger sensor than a smaller one, proportional to the crop factor. The type or cause of the movement does not matter (angular, linear, rotational, whatever). The 1/20 sec vs 1/30 sec speeds you mention ...


3

If the camera isn't moving and the subject isn't moving, there shouldn't be a significant change between shots. If either the camera, the subject or both are moving, then some shots are going to come out better than others. The steps you listed should adequately keep the camera still in most cases, so it comes down to subject. If the subject is ...


3

Arbitrary Release Time Lag is a new feature that Canon introduced to minimize camera shake due to mirror movement in a DSLR. In the past, savvy users have used the 2-second self-timer with mirror lockup enabled or similar techniques to achieve sharp results. The new feature gives a bit more flexibility with varying delays(1/8, 1/4, 1/2, 1, or 2 second). ...


3

Sample images would be awesome - as there's a few questions here that might help you: Why are my photos not crisp How can I prevent blurred images when using a tripod? How to stabilize a tripod My own hunch is what WayneF commented: you're probably getting a bit of wobble from pressing the shutter release button. If this is actually the case, you've got ...


3

Although you do not state whether you are using optical image stabilization, I suspect optical image stabilization is responding to phantom movements because you have problems with exposures > 5 sec, but not with exposures < 5 sec. (You state: "Under 5sec shutter speed I am getting crisp images.") If this is the case, turn off image stabilization while ...


2

You can try Kuuvik capture, it should have some interesting focus peaking function more info here: Northlight Images 'Kuuvik Capture' review 'Kuuvik Capture' website I too will find very useful a tool for finding the sharpest image in a sequence. I didn't have the occasion to try Kuuvik Capture, but it looks interesting.


2

Short: If you had a 70-200mm f/2.8 non IS lens or a 70-200mm f/4 IS lens that were otherwise identical (see below) then, if you value the ability to shoot handheld in marginal lighting situations, based on my solid personal experience of the functional equivalent of these two choices, you would end up much much much happier overall with the IS lens. ...


2

You can try this software: http://smartdeblur.net/ It's able to detect blur kernels automatically.


2

One other approach is to use a remote release. Basically you're decoupling the physical action of pressing the button (and hence jiggling the camera) from the shutter opening. A timer delay does this 'temporally', while a remote release does this 'spatially'. Even an old-fashioned cable-release will help, if your camera supports it.


2

You get a more shallow depth of field with a full frame camera so if you aren't careful with your forward/backward movements you can throw your subject out of focus. Or if you focus/recompose a lot you may have more problems with that. That's about all I can think of, though I've never heard someone say that a FF would be more forgiving.


2

It seems like you're the only person who can answer this. If you consistently find all 3 pictures are well focused, then it's not helpful to take multiple shots every time. Also, after taking a shot you can look at the LCD and zoom in to check if the last picture was focused. If not, take another. If it was, don't bother.


2

scottbb has more than adequately covered the pure photography side of things, so I'd like to add another aspect. Bouncing a camera repeatedly over a bumpy field on a hard mount & expecting it to last more than a week is going to be an expensive learning curve. I'd see the three main points of potential failure to be - The lens elements being shaken out ...


2

While the actual questions you asked aren't very broad in scope ("should I use Av/Tv/Manual mode?", and "Is the 18-55 STM lens useful for my application?"), I think the details of your use-case open this up to a HUGE range of considerations. Should I use Av mode, Tv mode or manual mode? You should use manual mode, with automatic ISO. ...


2

Mmmm... not really. Best I could do with Photoshop CC 2014's Filter > Sharpen > Shake Reduction.


2

Yes, to some extent. See also: Can anyone recommend *freeware* to reduce motion blur by deconvolution?


2

Unfortunately, no. Once taken, a blurred picture is composed by individual pixels disposed in a way that give this distortion effect. Some software algorithms are capable of reducing this effect when it is mild. They rely on a sort of automatic boundary recognition. Simplifying, when they see a difference in colors, they assume it is the edge of an object, ...


2

Try these links: https://www.blurity.com/ http://www.crunchytricks.com/2016/05/tools-to-unblur-photos.html However, the best way to avoid blurred pictures is to practice better photography and avoid hand shakes while clicking. Try to take pictures in better light if you're just using a mobile camera - OR use a better camera like a DSLR - but that takes you ...


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