15

Some "tricks" Ninja breathing, as above. Learn to hold breath at critical moment. Body braced in as stable a position as you can get it. "Think like a rock" :-) ie elbows in against body, head pulled down against body, "hunched" posture feet placed consciously firmly and maybe slightly spread. Brace against something !!! - Lamp post railing, corner of ...


14

It is indeed a rule that comes from film cameras. On point 4 the answer is simple: Multiply the focal length with the crop factor of your sensor. Because the sensor is smaller than a full frame sensor, it will not cover the full image circle, cropping out a smaller image. This has the effect of looking like a longer focal length. E.g. on Canon, a 50mm ...


12

I did some quick Google Books searches, and while I can't pinpoint the origin, there are a number of references to it as a rule of thumb or general guideline in the early 1970s, and none that I can find before that. There are plenty of earlier references to the idea that a longer focal length requires a faster shutter but they're all general advice. The ...


12

Now I will tell you a real training exercise. Train yourself to hand-hold the camera with a steady and non-jerking stroke when pressing the shutter release. Place an operating flashlight on a book shelf or mantel, at eyelevel height. Mount a small mirror before the camera lens. Use masking tape. Assume a picture taking position. Adjust yourself and camera ...


10

There are any number of times where you need a tripod: Where the camera needs to be operated remotely. For example were you want to include yourself in the shot (self portraits), or you are photographing sensitive wildlife and your presence would disturb the animals. Where you need to use a long exposure time. For photography at night or in other low light ...


9

Of course the answer is, it depends. A common rule often mentioned is that to get sharp images hand held, you need a shutter speed that is 1/focal length used. When using this rule though you must also take your format or sensor size into account. Lucky for you, you do have a full frame(35mm) sensor so no factor is necessary. You must also consider if your ...


9

This may not be a very elegant solution, it's more of a hack, but I once read a tip about searching for the sharpest picture out of a stack: look for the heavier files! I've used this method several times, and it works. From a technical standpoint, this makes sense because the JPEG algorithm will compress your RAW files a lot more when you take blurry shots;...


8

A tripod always matters. With a good tripod and head, a camera will always be more stable. There is a rule-of-thumb, which states that the shutter-speed should be faster than the reciprocal of the focal-length in 35mm-equivalent terms to get a sharp images while hand-holding. In the case of a 35mm lens on a full-frame camera, that should be 1/35s or ...


8

Yes, this precisely what Photoshop CC's Shake Reduction filter does. Adobe first publicly demonstrated their prototype feature at Adobe Max 2011. The crowd was pretty wowed by the demo. While it was demonstrated in 2011, Piccure actually introduced the feature before Adobe in 2013, as a plugin to Photoshop. See also: Adobe's help page for the Shake ...


7

IS modes are used to tell the camera what kind of movement to correct for. All implementations I'm aware of have at least two modes: "normal" to correct for motion in all axes and "panning" to allow motion in one axis while correcting for motion in the other. The exact details of each available mode depend on the manufacturer, for example Canon lenses can ...


7

Rather the contrary. Pixel density Of course, as you say, sometimes there is an issue with the sensor - but not directly related with 'more megapixels', but related with the actual pixel density (ie. number of pixels/sensor area). I don't know exactly any more which is the situation right now but it seems that 24 MP APS-C sensors have the biggest pixel ...


7

I don't think I've ever heard of it, and I've been reading about camera stabilization techniques since the 1980s. If I have ever heard of it, I have since forgotten it to the point that even this discussion does not jog a memory. Most instructionals emphasize holding the arms against the body (or other solid objects such as a wall, or a tree, etc.) so that ...


6

The only disadvantages are that it slows down your shooting (you have to wait a second or two after locking the mirror for the vibrations to subside) and that the viewfinder is black during this time so you can't react to changes in the scene. Having said that, you only benefit from mirror lookup when using telephoto lenses, or when shooting slow shutter ...


6

There are many factors that will influence the answer to your question, and the answer can vary significantly from one photographer to the next. The angular relationships between Angle of View and Focal Length. For any given sensor (or film) size, a particular focal length will yield a specific Angle of View (AoV). This is most often expressed in degrees. A ...


5

I don't know it by first hand, but I found out the following blog post. Apparently, Capture One Pro is able to find out the sharpest image in a sequence, as the following blurb points out: If you shoot a large quantity of images in a short period of time, for example with portrait or fashion work, it can often be time consuming to select the images with ...


5

I saw this Joe McNally video a while back and found that it helped me a good deal, especially as I have a mild hand tremor. Also relaxing, watching your breathing and making sure you roll your finger over the shutter button rather than press or stab at it makes a big difference.


5

A couple more instances: HDR (shooting bracketed photos) Panoramas Tripods are often helpful for setting up and envisioning composition (giving you a chance to think about what you're doing) Self portraits Macro photography benefits from tripod mounting because of the extremely narrow DOF found in this sort of photography. In the case of both panoramas and ...


5

the 1/focal length rule is based on the idea that degree to which detail is spread over the film plane is proportional to the focal length (when the focal length doubles, the blur doubles, any camera motion is effectively magnified), and also proportional to the shutter time (when the time the shutter is open is doulbed, the blur doubles, as twice much ...


5

Shooting multiple shots like this is certainly common, but it's not optimal. As your skills improve, you'd like to see your consistency improve, too. Shooting digitally, we're lucky that multiple shots cost next to nothing for us, but you want to move away from using that as a crutch. Instead, try to understand why you're seeing variation from shot-to-...


4

There's lots of good information in the other answers which we'll not repeat here, but one important thing that has been hinted at hasn't been explicitly mentioned: Pretty much all of the "rules of thumb" from the film era are based upon a presumption that the image will be printed no larger than 8x10 inches and viewed from a distance of about 10-12 inches ...


4

A string tripod might help you out here.


4

Faster aperture and image stabilization both reduce the effects of camera shake, but in very different ways. A faster aperture lets you use a shorter shutter speed for the same exposure. Image stabilization lets you keep the slower aperture and longer shutter speed and tries to actively counteract the movements of the camera. For completeness, a tripod also ...


4

As a Gorillapod user (SLR version) with a small Nikon DSLR and Sony 5R, I noticed that the camera shake comes mainly from the tripod being less than ideally attached to the pole/branch/bar/whatever. This is not easily fixed, because most times the Gorillapod cannot be ideally set up with no camera shake (especially if you need to adjust it and recompose a ...


4

I am not familiar with that technique and to be honest, I don't recall any training or practice to help holding the camera steady. This is because of two factors: holding the camera correctly, and understanding the impact of shutter speed on motion. I suggest doing a google search on 'how to hold a camera', where you will be linked to many stories such as ...


4

You are able to use slower shutter speeds because you switched to a larger sensor. A given amount of movement is relatively smaller compared with a larger sensor than a smaller one, proportional to the crop factor. The type or cause of the movement does not matter (angular, linear, rotational, whatever). The 1/20 sec vs 1/30 sec speeds you mention ...


3

Impossible to answer. There are no absolute for any of the elements involved. Let me elaborate: Every lens varies in sharpness as aperture changes. Lenses are sharper a little stopped down from the maximum. This can be anywhere between 1/2 to 3 F-stops, and there are the few exceptional lenses which are sharpest at their widest aperture. You will get ...


3

Mirror lock up is effective if the camera is held in place (by a tripod, resting on a place...). If the camera is hand held, or on a monopod, its benefits are reduced or completely lost. In short, when using mirror lock up, first you compose, then the mirror flips and the camera waits for some short time before taking the picture. This gives time to dampen ...


3

The 1/shutter speed rule is intended as a guideline or rule of thumb, and shouldn't be taken as a perfectly precise number. Likewise, the transition from "sharp" to "not sharp" isn't absolute and sudden; the sharpness will degrade gradually as you go to longer exposure times. Also, different people of different ages holding different cameras and lenses at ...


3

This is going to sound stupid (and I'm not a professional photographer) but I've been in your situation. I try to place my camera on an (ideally near-flat) object, lower my center-of-gravity (typically by spreading my legs or crouching down), and press the shutter after I exhale (and just before I inhale). Many times I wish I had a tripod when interesting ...


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