13

Now I will tell you a real training exercise. Train yourself to hand-hold the camera with a steady and non-jerking stroke when pressing the shutter release. Place an operating flashlight on a book shelf or mantel, at eyelevel height. Mount a small mirror before the camera lens. Use masking tape. Assume a picture taking position. Adjust yourself and camera ...


8

Yes, this precisely what Photoshop CC's Shake Reduction filter does. Adobe first publicly demonstrated their prototype feature at Adobe Max 2011. The crowd was pretty wowed by the demo. While it was demonstrated in 2011, Piccure actually introduced the feature before Adobe in 2013, as a plugin to Photoshop. See also: Adobe's help page for the Shake ...


7

I don't think I've ever heard of it, and I've been reading about camera stabilization techniques since the 1980s. If I have ever heard of it, I have since forgotten it to the point that even this discussion does not jog a memory. Most instructionals emphasize holding the arms against the body (or other solid objects such as a wall, or a tree, etc.) so that ...


7

Rather the contrary. Pixel density Of course, as you say, sometimes there is an issue with the sensor - but not directly related with 'more megapixels', but related with the actual pixel density (ie. number of pixels/sensor area). I don't know exactly any more which is the situation right now but it seems that 24 MP APS-C sensors have the biggest pixel ...


5

Shooting multiple shots like this is certainly common, but it's not optimal. As your skills improve, you'd like to see your consistency improve, too. Shooting digitally, we're lucky that multiple shots cost next to nothing for us, but you want to move away from using that as a crutch. Instead, try to understand why you're seeing variation from shot-to-...


4

I am not familiar with that technique and to be honest, I don't recall any training or practice to help holding the camera steady. This is because of two factors: holding the camera correctly, and understanding the impact of shutter speed on motion. I suggest doing a google search on 'how to hold a camera', where you will be linked to many stories such as ...


4

As a Gorillapod user (SLR version) with a small Nikon DSLR and Sony 5R, I noticed that the camera shake comes mainly from the tripod being less than ideally attached to the pole/branch/bar/whatever. This is not easily fixed, because most times the Gorillapod cannot be ideally set up with no camera shake (especially if you need to adjust it and recompose a ...


4

There's lots of good information in the other answers which we'll not repeat here, but one important thing that has been hinted at hasn't been explicitly mentioned: Pretty much all of the "rules of thumb" from the film era are based upon a presumption that the image will be printed no larger than 8x10 inches and viewed from a distance of about 10-12 inches ...


4

You are able to use slower shutter speeds because you switched to a larger sensor. A given amount of movement is relatively smaller compared with a larger sensor than a smaller one, proportional to the crop factor. The type or cause of the movement does not matter (angular, linear, rotational, whatever). The 1/20 sec vs 1/30 sec speeds you mention ...


3

Although you do not state whether you are using optical image stabilization, I suspect optical image stabilization is responding to phantom movements because you have problems with exposures > 5 sec, but not with exposures < 5 sec. (You state: "Under 5sec shutter speed I am getting crisp images.") If this is the case, turn off image stabilization while ...


3

Sample images would be awesome - as there's a few questions here that might help you: Why are my photos not crisp How can I prevent blurred images when using a tripod? How to stabilize a tripod My own hunch is what WayneF commented: you're probably getting a bit of wobble from pressing the shutter release button. If this is actually the case, you've got ...


3

If the camera isn't moving and the subject isn't moving, there shouldn't be a significant change between shots. If either the camera, the subject or both are moving, then some shots are going to come out better than others. The steps you listed should adequately keep the camera still in most cases, so it comes down to subject. If the subject is ...


3

Arbitrary Release Time Lag is a new feature that Canon introduced to minimize camera shake due to mirror movement in a DSLR. In the past, savvy users have used the 2-second self-timer with mirror lockup enabled or similar techniques to achieve sharp results. The new feature gives a bit more flexibility with varying delays(1/8, 1/4, 1/2, 1, or 2 second). ...


2

One other approach is to use a remote release. Basically you're decoupling the physical action of pressing the button (and hence jiggling the camera) from the shutter opening. A timer delay does this 'temporally', while a remote release does this 'spatially'. Even an old-fashioned cable-release will help, if your camera supports it.


2

You get a more shallow depth of field with a full frame camera so if you aren't careful with your forward/backward movements you can throw your subject out of focus. Or if you focus/recompose a lot you may have more problems with that. That's about all I can think of, though I've never heard someone say that a FF would be more forgiving.


2

It seems like you're the only person who can answer this. If you consistently find all 3 pictures are well focused, then it's not helpful to take multiple shots every time. Also, after taking a shot you can look at the LCD and zoom in to check if the last picture was focused. If not, take another. If it was, don't bother.


2

You can try this software: http://smartdeblur.net/ It's able to detect blur kernels automatically.


2

scottbb has more than adequately covered the pure photography side of things, so I'd like to add another aspect. Bouncing a camera repeatedly over a bumpy field on a hard mount & expecting it to last more than a week is going to be an expensive learning curve. I'd see the three main points of potential failure to be - The lens elements being shaken out ...


2

While the actual questions you asked aren't very broad in scope ("should I use Av/Tv/Manual mode?", and "Is the 18-55 STM lens useful for my application?"), I think the details of your use-case open this up to a HUGE range of considerations. Should I use Av mode, Tv mode or manual mode? You should use manual mode, with automatic ISO. ...


2

Try these links: https://www.blurity.com/ http://www.crunchytricks.com/2016/05/tools-to-unblur-photos.html However, the best way to avoid blurred pictures is to practice better photography and avoid hand shakes while clicking. Try to take pictures in better light if you're just using a mobile camera - OR use a better camera like a DSLR - but that takes you ...


2

Mmmm... not really. Best I could do with Photoshop CC 2014's Filter > Sharpen > Shake Reduction.


2

Yes, to some extent. See also: Can anyone recommend *freeware* to reduce motion blur by deconvolution?


2

Unfortunately, no. Once taken, a blurred picture is composed by individual pixels disposed in a way that give this distortion effect. Some software algorithms are capable of reducing this effect when it is mild. They rely on a sort of automatic boundary recognition. Simplifying, when they see a difference in colors, they assume it is the edge of an object, ...


2

Certainly the muscle stability this could potentially develop could be useful, but I'm not familiar with this being an actual training method in any training I've ever seen for building a stable platform. I have both a steady hand for photo and film (was recognized recently at a film festival for some of my stabilization work) and am a qualified ...


2

There are a couple of things that I think that you can do: Learn your lowest shutter speed: At 24mm, I would have expected you to be able to hand hold 1/25 and especially 1/60. Now, that might be too low and your subject might move, causing motion blur, but you shouldn't be getting camera shake at those speeds at that focal length. You should practice ...


1

Does that technique really exist or is it just another urban legend? There is no such technique. What you describe appears to have been inspired by Doctor Strange, Iron Fist, and other depictions of monastery monks in training. It could also be part of the patter of a magic trick, where the water disappears or the cup floats or something.


1

I simply don't try to do anything with it. I have actually captured many of these type of images, of course, unitentionally, and posted them with the caption Shakiness of the Modern Life! and believe me, those pics got more than 100 likes!


1

Photoshop CC has a Shake Reduction filter to try to remove motion blur. However, your particular example image might not be well suited to the blur removal feature. From Adobe's help page about the Shake Reduction filter: The camera shake reduction feature works best with decently lit still camera images having low noise. The following types of still images ...


1

I found the source of the problem: my hand When taking the images, three distinct sounds are made: the clunk of the mirror up, the click of the front curtain opening and the "tic-schlup" of the rear curtain closing and the mirror dropping down. I had (incorrectly?) interpreted the "tic" as the curtain closing. It was actually within the "sch" part of the ...


1

Most modern implementations does counter shutter shock, others primarily fist generation doesn't. But it depends on the type of implementation. IBIS and current generation optical IS does almost exclusively work during the entire exposure and therefore does counter shock (A7R included by the way).


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