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10

Unfortunately, selfie sticks are manufactured with very different designs one from another and with very wide range of standards (i.e. you can get worthless garbage or overbuilt luxury), so it is highly difficult to know all possible connection/activation mechanisms. Use with smartphones A huge number of s. sticks are made for smartphones, meaning that ...


10

There's a lot of overlap in terms of what can be used with each type of support. In general both tripods and monopods use a standard 3/8" bolt to connect to the heads attached to them. So pretty much any head that can be attached to a tripod can also be attached to a monopod and vice versa. But monopods and tripods tend to be used differently and thus the ...


9

The monopod removes three degrees of liberty: distance from ground is fixed, and roll and pitch are linked to position in space. But you are overlooking that you are no longer lifting the (potentially heavy) lens, so its shaking is no longer caused by your muscular control, itself affected by muscular fatigue(*). Of course the 55-250mm is a rather light ...


8

The correct answer totally depends upon the specific lens and also upon the manner in which you desire to use it. Even when using a lens on a tripod, some lenses require you to turn IS off, some do it automatically for you, and others actually have IS modes specifically created for tripod use. The last category includes Canon's Super Telephoto series that ...


7

It's instructive to look where monopods are most often used: sporting events, and shooting wildlife. In all of these cases, it's not a matter of "how many stops" a monopod can provide. It's simply a matter of increasing the keeper rate of shots. Competitive Sports (football, soccer, etc.) Monopod are ubiquitous along the sidelines of professional football (...


6

Although I've used a monopod in a pinch (because I had a monopod with me and didn't have a tripod), the only real way to go for night photography unless you are shooting in a place very well lit with artificial light is a tripod. In general I've found a monopod buys about three or four stops slower than the 1/(focal length X crop factor) rule for non-...


6

There is no such thing. Unlike a tripod, a monopod only improves stability. How much will depend on the particular monopod, its height, the wind, the focal-length you use, how you breath, etc. What you can hope is that it will improve compared to how you hand-hold. Remember than these is no absolute their either. A common rule of thumb is 1 over the focal-...


5

Here are various reasons that I may choose to use a hand strap, shoulder strap (never around the neck), monopod, or tripod: Hand Strap - I don't currently have a hand strap and have not used one for a couple of years, my gear is just too heavy at this point. Fast lenses on prosumer DSLRs are too heavy for me to carry with just a hand strap for 5 hours at a ...


4

Interestingly enough, I recently released a youtube video showing the results of testing two of my lenses. This is the video link, but here's the final result from it: you should do some tests with each of your lenses! They may all behave differently. For me, my 70-200 fails miserably with IS on. So I must remember to turn it off, or regret the results. ...


4

Since each leg section is nested in the next when the monopod is compacted, splitting it in two won't result in either section being much smaller than entire monopod. Each section appears to be around 22-23 inches long. What you can do is remove the head, but you're not going to gain much there. Looking at the parts diagram published by Manfrotto, it appears ...


3

There are three basic choices regarding heads used with true monopods. Which one works best for you will depend on what you want to place on the monopod and what you want to shoot with it as well as personal preference. No head at all Many monopod users use no head at all. With larger, heavier lenses that will most often be used with the lens' optical axis ...


3

There isn't really any comparison between a shoulder strap or a monopod. A shoulder strap is used to carry a camera when not in use and to keep it easily accessible. A good shoulder strap is highly recommended as it both makes it more comfortable to have the camera at the ready as well as being a nice safety feature to prevent it from hitting the ground if ...


2

I've put mine back together a few times after one of the dividers keeping it from falling apart failed, so in theory you could do it. But it's not worth the trouble, and leaves the monopod weak and prone to falling apart on you again when you don't want it to. It also increases the total volume you'll be taking with you, for very little reduction in the ...


2

Are you talking about something similar to this. Basically a little stick that can attach to the mount that you can hold on to as an extra grip surface? Those fall under the category of rigs, which are support structures that are designed to be used against the body and not the ground. There are a wide variety of types available ranging from the basic ...


2

How many extra stops do monopods offer for tele photographs? In general I've found a monopod buys about three or four stops slower than the 1/(focal length X crop factor) rule for non-stabilized lenses. For stabilized lenses the monopod will help extend whatever benefit the Image Stabilization, Vibration Reduction, etc. provides by another stop or two. A ...


2

This will be more than an actual answer, a complement of your question, which hopefully will help you answer your question. Let's not use airplanes terminology. Let's use camera movements. We have 6 camera movements related to 3-dimensional space and one additional for a total of 7. We need to define our coordinate angles similar of those of a 3D program, ...


1

Tripod threads are measured in diameter-threads/inch. The two most common sizes are 3/8”-16 and 1/4”-20. Many tripods and tripod heads sport 3/8” while many cameras use 1/4”. If looking to attach your camera directly to the tripod, you’ll most likely need a 3/8” to 1/4” adapter. These are super common in the US and can be found just about anywhere that ...


1

Longer monopod is better stabilization it provides It's simple - while having a link with a ground, monopod converts all movements to circular and becomes a radius for camera movement in space, so bigger radius is - camera changes less angle while moving around for the same distance. And angle is what actually makes long-focus lens "shake" most of the time (...


1

To be precise monopode do not remove completely pitch and roll. It just move the point of rotation to be not the camera itself but the point where monopod touch the ground. This mitigate a lot but do not remove completely. About yaw shake - you should be not afraid of. You should name it freedom and I think many sport photographers will agree.


1

Op-Tech's Lens Loop is one such product that has connectors that allow them to be used with a plethora of straps they offer. Use of the loop allows a quick release plate to remain attached to the lens' tripod foot. I have not personally used the Lens Loop myself. I do use the Op-Tech system and have been very happy with both a Canon Professional Services ...


1

Because of the longer exposure times usually needed for night photography, often as long as 30 seconds, I doubt you will get acceptable photographs with a monopod. If your tripod is cumbersome and heavy, I suggest you look for a lighter tripod. As an example, there are many carbon-fiber tripods that weigh 3-4 pounds.


1

As a general rule, if you couldn't get the shot freehand with a point and shoot, then a monopod isn't going to help much. The primary purpose of a monopod is to support the weight of the camera. This is why you rarely see someone using a monopod with a point and shoot. The heavier the weight, the harder it is to hold steady because you have to fight that ...


1

Monopod: (+) Added stability when taking photo (+) Can be used to support you by leaning on it/used as a walking stick (-) Can be bulky/difficult to carry Neck/shoulder strap: (+) Provides a safety net should you drop your camera (-) Having heavy gear around your neck/shoulder can give you neck/shoulder ache The ideal solution is to have a separate ...


1

Situations for which I find a monopod useful: When shooting an event for several hours, allowing the monopod to support the weight of a heavy lens is quite beneficial for your arm, shoulder, neck, and back muscles. You can "stack" the benefits of IS and the extra stabilization the monopod supplies. If you're using a 200mm lens on a 1.6x crop body, you would ...


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