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39

A tripod can be unstable by: Having cheap leg fasteners / too heavy a load for the legs My first tripod ever was a hand-me-down Velbon that had seen some abuse. Even sporting just a 20D and 70-200 f/4 (~3.2lbs) if left alone, the legs would begin to collapse. Slowly, sure, but enough to not want to walk away or be able to do a long exposure. Poor ...


27

Scandinavia is pretty much the safest part of Europe. You have absolutely nothing to worry about, and there is no reason to behave any different than in your home country in regard to safety. That being said, things tend to break or get lost at the worst time. Backing up your photos is definitely a good idea, as is getting a good bag and straps. And do not ...


27

This picture, and others similar to it, aren't pictures of the woman. These are travel snapshots, with some landmark and a woman in the same frame. There's nothing wrong with such snapshots per se. In fact, they're pretty great: they show where you were, remind you of the good times, and they're not anything like the travel postcards you could buy, even ...


24

First of all: Do everything your government tells you to do. Follow the recommendations. Be rational and don't be careless or selfish! In case you can still move freely in your area: Explore your neighbourhood. You may be surprised what a nearby forest, park or an old quarry can offer. Visit places otherwise occupied by tourists (now probably empty). Learn ...


23

I think you're going about this the wrong way. If you have 2GB of images at 4-5MB each, that's somewhere between 400 and 500 images. That's way too many. Even your close friends probably don't want to wade through all of that. Instead, go through and pick out the very best 10%. Or 5% or even 1%. Take some care and write a meaningful caption for each one. An ...


22

I have a nice heavy tripod and a cheap, light aluminum tripod. I hear a lot of people talking about wind and vibration, etc, and I think you're right - the environment makes a big difference. Landscapes with little to no wind are very forgiving. However, even little wind can go a long way and cause vibration and the type of vibration we're talking about ...


20

Purposely I avoid to use all of these types of devices while traveling. There are two reasons: They are all based on an internal hard-disk drive which is fragile. One drop and a traditional hard-disk is dead. Having moving parts is what makes it more fragile. In several of models you can get around this by replacing the disk with an SSD which solves this ...


19

Having lived in Europe all my life, most of it with a camera around my neck (at least during my free time), I wonder where you got the idea that it's inherently unsafe to be in Europe while having a camera with you. The only time I've ever had gear stolen in 30 years+ was during a burglary at the house I was staying... Of course every country and city has ...


16

I am on the edge of investing in the Sony a6000 ... Ok, fallacy #1. :) You never invest in a camera unless you're a pro and can write it off on your taxes. Cameras depreciate. Even while new. Your "investment" will never give you any monetary returns. This is an expense, pure and simple. (If anybody has other suggestions in that price range - I am ...


15

At home studio photography; portraits, food, pets, retail/object photos macro photography; dust, bugs, small objects, plants time-lapse; light through a window, stars in the sky, a clock practical; document items for your home-owner’s/renter’s insurance themes: lighting, space, scale, profiling, silhouettes technical: improving your computer setup, ...


14

I wouldn't be concerned much about the camera body; there isn't really anything in it that would be very sensitive to vibrations. The only mechanical parts are the shutter and mirror, and both are in a safe postion when the camera is switched off. Lenses are a different matter: individual lens elements can and do become decentered, which can result in ...


14

May I ask how a tripod can be unstable? Unstable might be the wrong word to describe the major problem with tripods; unsteady might be a better choice. Tripods are quite stable in the sense that, absent a really strong wind or careless photographer, all three feet will generally stay on the ground. They don't rock like a four-legged table on uneven ground. ...


13

Absolutely. Even if price is not an issue, an F/4 lens offers an important saving in weight. Now, it is important to understand that aperture is one difference but the most significant is image quality. A cheap 55-200mm is rather poor and you have to stop it down to F/8 or even F/11 to get decent results which is very restrictive. Still you can get a high ...


12

I've had a couple of purpose-built copy-and-store devices that I bought for the same reasons you describe. One had a hard disk built in and the other burned CDs. They worked, but the better models were (and still are) costly. On the one with the built-in disk, I didn't like the idea that I couldn't pull the drive from the unit, plug it into a PC and ...


12

During night you may do some astrophotography, if light pollution allows you. Long exposition with lunar or city lights. Sometimes twilight and light pollution may give you beatiful clouds, mountains, cityscapes, etc. During day, pet photgraphy if you have pets. Internet doesn't have enough cats yet.


11

You certainly need to upgrade your lens and consider how everything fits your trip. You did not say what arrangements you made for the Galapagos but people usually spend a bit of time on the main island (Isabela) and take a boat which stops at several islands in some kind of circuit. The other option is to stay on the mainland and take day-trips to each ...


11

In low-light settings the quality is just not good, blurry. I really just do travel photography so don't have time to mess with settings if I am capturing scenes of people out at night in a busy Chinese pedestrian street, for example. Then get a good phone that does computational photography very well. It will think for you more than and better than any ...


10

Contrarily to everyone here, I always check my tripod. It's too big even though it collapses to 42cm since it's almost 60cm long with the ball-head and leveling base. I do carry a Gorillapd SLR-Zoom in my carry-on for backup. I know someone who carries the head on their carry-on but its too much of a hassle for me. To make it easy, I shopped for a hard-...


10

While I've never been to India, I've travelled in other countries of Southeast Asia. These are countries where you see vibrant colours everywhere. If it were I, I would shoot a reversal film because of the gorgeous results you get with such vibrant scenes. My preference is Fujifilm Provia, but many people rave about Velvia. If you can, try to shoot a test ...


9

I only have a fairly small aluminum tripod (53 cm / 21" folded, sans head), which fits inside my suitcase and is more than sturdy enough to take any abuse the luggage handlers might dish out, so I've never had any trouble with it. I assume yours is both bigger and more expensive, though, which could make things more problematic. That said, I've had similar ...


8

As is often the case, "there is no free lunch". JPEG is the de-facto standard image format, and uses lossy compression. That means that to get smaller file sizes, you will lose image quality. The only question is how much you lose, and whether that loss is acceptable. That said, there are lossless compression techniques that are used by other formats (...


8

I would probably prioritise the lenses like this, and bring as many as I feel like carrying: 18-70mm - most usefull multi-purpose 70-300mm - to zoom in on architecture details and people 35mm f1.8 - good to have for low light and nice for narrow DOF 55-200mm The build quality of the lenses would however come in play also. If there is a pro-grade lens I ...


8

My direct experience with travel matches advice I was given years ago: expect to take the same kinds of photos, with the same type of equipment, as at home. If you have a particular lens that is rarely needed then there's no reason to expect that this will finally be the time to use it. The same goes for tripods, field notebooks, or any other new habit that ...


8

I read a "we" in there. That implies a partner or family, or at the least a roommate. That means you have a subject for portraiture or modeling. A bedsheet or quilt can be pressed into service as a backdrop, floor or desk lamps can work as hot lights, and desk chairs make fine studio stools. You can, of course, also shoot in situ, in places like kitchens,...


7

First, three very important tips: Take extra batteries and memory cards, that $2000+ you can't afford lens is of no use if you battery is empty. Try to rent equipment if possible, buying a good general purpose lens is ok but if you want to get a super-telephoto wildlife lens you will only use once - rent it. Make sure you are familiar with your new ...


7

Given this is your first time with a DSLR, and given what you want to do, these 2 lenses will be plenty enough. Now, when you will have experience with this setup, you may feel limited by your lenses, but this will greatly depend on how you will use them and what you want to do. So wait for when you will feel limited, this time will come and you'll know ...


7

Two of the lenses I would consider would be either the EF-S 15-85mm f/3.5-5.6 IS or the EF 24-105mm f/4L IS. The 15-85 is lighter and covers a wide range of focal lengths. The 24-105 is built like a tank and covers a range of longer focal lengths. If you intend on taking mostly long range pictures, the EF 70-200mm f/4L IS is the way to go, but it is a ...


7

Your underlying problem seems to be how to take (better) photos quickly, not what camera you should get. While equipment can make more of a difference than some would like to believe, it seems you have not yet reached the limits of your current gear. Switching cameras may even slow you down. Recently, I met someone with a brand-new full-frame Nikon DSLR ...


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