6

You only need one rule: File Name / Type → Copy Name = isn't empty.


6

"Contains" matches on partial words, e.g. if you select Keywords contains lon it will pick images with the keywords london, babylon, and alone. If you use multiple strings to match with, e.g. Keywords contains lon, lac then it would match images where any keyword contains a part of either string. "Contains all" will match on multiple partial words, e.g. ...


4

Your example is in fact worse than you realize: the rule keywords contain words John Doe will find photos with the keyword John Irvin Doe, John Joseph Doe, John Doe, as well as partial matches like Jane Doe and John Smith. The trick is quotes: a filter with the rule keywords contain words "John Doe" will find only the keyword "John Doe."


3

No, Lightroom doesn't let you check for being in the Previous Import in the filters for a smart collection. If your goal for the smart collection is to show only images that you need to add keywords to then the most reliable workaround I know of is to setup your import process to automatically add a keyword to indicate that you haven't added your keywords ...


3

Collections are an alternate way to organize (and far superior in my opinion).They are not required. Collections are created independent of where an image is located, and can be created by physically dragging photos into a collection manually, or can be created via metadata, such as Camera Maker, Date, Lens type, etc. I recommend you keep your existing ...


3

I tried this, in LR 4: keyword contains "mykeyword" AND keyword doesn't contain "abcdfghijklnpqstuvxz" where the 2nd string is all the letters NOT in "mykeyword" not perfect, but it's a quick and dirty hack that mostly works.


2

This is a workflow question, so it's really a matter of personal preference, but I'll toss out an idea that works fairly well for me when I'm doing something like this. Typically, when I'm working on a batch of photos, they're in the same collection -- via folder, smart collection, etc. When I begin work, I select all the photos in the batch and set their ...


1

You can click cmd-A (cntrl-A windows) to select all, then click on an image and drag/drop them to a new location. It will not recreate the date folder structure in the new location (AFAIK); but you can have the images sorted by capture date (i.e. in sequence).


1

There is a plugin called Any Filter by John R. Ellis that allows you to do this kind of search. The plugin is something you would have to buy, but there is no set price; just pay what you think is fair for the added functionality.


1

You can set the Attribute Filter on Flagged Then select all pictures, click right and Export


1

A script to create folders from read metadata combined with a time based trigger (see https://superuser.com/questions/126907/how-can-i-get-a-script-to-run-every-day-on-mac-os-x) could do the job. See exiftool to get the metadata


1

I've poked into this a bit in the past, and you won't like the answer much. Publish services, because they interact with so many parts of Lightroom and with code blocks installed as plug-ins, are complicated beasts. Adobe's chosen to store their configuration information in the preferences file, not in a preset file. The preferences file for Lightroom 5 (...


1

The best approach I can think of for this is to use keywords. The advantage would be that when you do that and switch to smart collections, you could then star using AND and OR logic to combine or exclude images automatically. I'm not entirely sure I see why you think switching to Smart Collections would be an improvement, but I think it would allow you to ...


1

With the current version of Lightroom this is not possible, however you can create a smart collection of images based on their Treatment which can be either color or black and white: If you can find a way to set your black and white photos to use this Treatment flag to indicate they are monochrome (again, I can see no quick way to do this), then you should ...


1

Maybe a combination of Keywords and Colors (or Keywords and Ratings) might work if Lightroom's keyword support falls short. For example, you could set up your smart collection to match all the conditions, with the conditions including a Keyword of _shutterstock and a Color of green for accepted. YMMV depending on whether you already have other uses for ...


1

Lightroom doesn't do well with understanding hierarchical keywords for its filters, however you could try setting the collection to match ALL the conditions and have one for _shutterstock and one for _accepted. Any image with the shutterstock accepted keyword will have both shutterstock and accepted since they are nested.


1

You can't have a smart collection that references another smart collection and I suspect that this is to prevent a kind of infinite loop in the rules and causing performance/stability issues. So smart collections only search for normal collections when matching your rules.


1

As everyone else has mentioned you need to change the image in a way on which it can be searched. I just tested and you can create a development preset, called 00-Finished and apply to the photo when you are done working on it. Then make your collection include any image without the preset. You do not have to apply any changes with the preset. In this way ...


1

You can use keywords, flags or ratings to do this, but you need to setup your filter on some value that you are going to use in your workflow to indicate that the image is done being edited. There can't be an automatic way since Lightroom has no way to know if you are done or not.


1

You might also take a look at John Ellis' Any Filter plugin. It allows a search that can distinguish an explicit keyword only (the bottom one of the hierarchy, like Place. But then it can also use a criterion "subkeyword of" which I would think you could use to distinguish the places by only finding the subkeyword of "subject matter." But couldn't you just ...


1

When I am faced with such a problem, I put something easier to match in as an un-exported synonym for the keyword: Now I can search for Contains Words → !shotfrom and be certain of finding only photos that are missing a LOCATION keyword, as opposed to a SUBJECT MATTER > Location keyword. That's a little-known trick there, by the way: Contains Words ...


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