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19

The camera doesn't know what the most important parts of the image are, and therefore what you would like to have in focus. Traditionally autofocus systems have simply selected the closest object near the centre of the frame and focussed on that. This can easily fail in the presence of irrelevant foreground details. Face detection makes the assumption that ...


11

Face detection works by detecting elements in the photo which are common to faces (eyes, mouth). Recognition works by comparing measurements of relationships of these elements across a database of known faces. (Usually, a matrix of measurements in reconstructed 3D space.) You can defeat detection by either a) obscuring so much of the face that the computer ...


8

It is the same cameras that have face detection. Even though the face detection is shows as a box around the faces, it internally has a model for the eyes and mouth, so it already knows where the mouth is. The shape of the mouth is then used to detect the smile by computing a single "probability of a smile" parameter. You set a threshold for when it should ...


6

Lightroom 6 (the perpetual license version) and Lightroom CC (the subscription-based version) now offer a built-in face recognition feature. It doesn't work perfectly yet, though.


6

Here's my photography-centric answer. How often do you need to do this? Pretty much just once for the full collection. Maybe the equivalent once every few years. At 10 seconds an image, this is going to be done in under ten days. So, just let it go and worry about something else for ten days. I know this goes against the generally-admirable instinct to do ...


5

You are right that Faces are not part of EXIF but XMP. You can take a look at Daminion (where I work). It can import face information from Windows Live Photo Gallery and Picasa into the People tag. All your image annotations called tags in Daminion can be synced with your image metadata as EXIF/IPTC/XMP/MWG and "travel" along with your files including face ...


4

Yes, it is. Lightroom can do all the things you asked for (and more). The process should be non-destructive and the images unchanged unless I explicitly allow this (see points below). Lightroom does this. All the adjustments you make are stored in the Lightroom database, the original RAW files are never touched in any way (though you can chose to convert ...


4

A quirk that I have found with the Lightroom versions I have used [LR3 through Classic'19 at time of writing] is that they've been designed to 'play nice' with other programs by not willingly sucking up every last resource they can get their hands on. Instead they will use a moderate resource level to avoid bogging the system down entirely and preventing ...


3

digiKam (https://www.digikam.org) writes tags into the metadata of the image.


3

For a number of applications, this issue is often solved by using a dedicated PTZ Camera, which has a camera with a zoom lens integrated with a motor-driven and controllable pan+tilt head. Most of these cameras nowadays are also IP cameras that can be controlled via network or IoT standard interfaces. In surveillance, these cameras are often mounted upside ...


2

Face detection has to do with focusing and is performed by the camera, not the flash. Whatever face detection features your camera body are capable of will determine the performance of the camera/flash system in this regard. With most bodies this would require using Live View to use the facial detection features. The EOS 1D X has an advanced metering system ...


2

You can use this command ExifTool -XMP-mwg-rs:all= -P FILEorDIR The -P makes sure the file system timestamps don't change. Add -r to recurse. This command creates backup copies of the files. Add -overwrite_original to avoid that.


2

Digikam has an SQLite database. I am not an SQL expert, but such databases allow for powerful search operations. While I do not have a direct answer, I am hoping the following avenues of research will be helpful. First start with Digikam's advanced search feature. Start with Browse->Search and activate the "Advanced Search ..." menu. Select the criteria ...


2

I am the founder of http://TagMeNot.info, a visual privacy initiative (@dontTag on twitter). There are at least three different kinds of automatic "face recognition" techniques: 1) face detection: spotting a face in the picture 2) face matching: the face is recognized to be the same face as in another different picture 3) face identification: the face being ...


2

Is there any way/technique I can use to get consistent face sharpness? Sounds like the automatic eye detection just isn't working well for you and you should therefore use regular old autofocus or even manual focus. Setting the focus on the point of interest yourself should solve the problem. If you're more comfortable using the eye detection mode despite ...


2

My now ageing dslr has similar struggles. The only sure fire way to achieve perfect focus is a still subject, a tripod and using manual focus with a zoomed in live view on the screen (I don't have focus peaking). Not really the recipe for relaxed or informal portraits. Alternatively, using the advantage of digital, shoot lots of images with auto focus and ...


2

That's because the X-T10's eye detection focus just isn't that good. Things to do to make it focus better includes (but I think you know them already): Have the face take up a larger part of the photo, hence a bigger eye area for the camera to focus to Make sure the face is better lit Make sure the subject stays very still


2

Apart from assisting focus, some cameras do not only have face detection but also try to detect the expression, like for auto shooting when people are smiling, instead of taking 10 images to get people to smile. You can even get a rotating tripod for e.g. Sony WX1 that allows you to put it in the middle of the table and have it rotate and snap pictures ...


2

Use green screen & some fast isolation software, such as those from FXHome - the older PhotoKey or the new Imerge (which I haven't tried yet, but seems to also be half the price of the old one.) Other solutions are available, but that's the one I've used the most. Googling for stills software isn't as easy as for movie, but it's out there somewhere. I ...


1

This will totally depend on what facial recognition software you are using. A few other things to suggest are: Make sure there is no occlusion of the subjects face in an image (such as wearing sunglasses, the subject having hair over their face etc) Ensure the subjects eyes are in focus (many facial recognition algorithms rely on the eyes being important ...


1

1) On focusing: I find with the X-T10 the best way to get reliable focus is the DIY approach. The nice thing about Fuji cameras is that "manual focus" doesn't have to be manual at all. It just means "I'm in control" as opposed to the S and C modes where the camera: 1) Makes a lot of decisions for you 2) Makes them as you press the shutter In the world ...


1

I'm pretty sure the face detection takes cues from the selected focus area. This is based on my subjective experience with the X-T10 and X-T2 — use the zone focus with a small square (3×3) and put that on the face — the face detection seems to me to then prefer faces/eyes within that square (although it will occasionally grab something else). I can't prove ...


1

DigiKam has a facial recognition module.


1

Had the same issue. I just left-click on "Confirm" and that's it. digiKam doesn't seem to like 'Enter' that much.


1

Yes. DigiKam will do face recognition of a single photograph so long as you have other ones of the same face with tags to use for reference. The KDE UserBase Wiki outlines the technique and procedure in several languages. You can find their relevant info here:Digikam/Face Recognition


1

There is a plugin called Any Filter by John R. Ellis that allows you to do this kind of search. The plugin is something you would have to buy, but there is no set price; just pay what you think is fair for the added functionality.


1

Your question has more to do with video than photography. Anyway, if you want to add face masks on an existing video, you just need a video application with tracking capabilities (e.g. After effects, Hitfilm express, DaVinci Resolve etc.) If you want to do it real time on a video stream you need some kind of video processing library and face detection ...


1

Lightroom search does have its weaknesses, but finding the intersection between multiple keywords is definitely something it can do. My favourite way to do this is using the "Library Filter" menu. Select all Photographs, then activate "Metadata" filter, change the first column to "Keyword" and select your first keyword. Then change the second column to "...


1

Lightroom has a nice feature for this. It might look complicated but it is really easy and powerful! After getting accustomed it becomes 'piece of cake'. [optional] Clear Quick Collection Filter photos with the first of your kids (by clicking on apropriate keyword) Select all of them (Ctrl-A or Command-A) Filter photos with the second of your kids (by ...


1

No I do not think Lightroom is the tool for you. Or rather, is too much tool for you. You want the ability to index and tag images, add GPS tracks, and basically view images non-destructively. Lightroom is a RAW Image Editing tool, and a quite powerful one. It does offer extensive indexing, sorting and tagging capabilities. However, Lightroom may be '...


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