11

When you select multiple photos, the asterisk * indicates that particular keyword has only been applied to a subset of the selection. So, all the photos you've selected have the keywords Bob, mom and grill; only some (or at least one) has the keyword Jane.


4

Your example is in fact worse than you realize: the rule keywords contain words John Doe will find photos with the keyword John Irvin Doe, John Joseph Doe, John Doe, as well as partial matches like Jane Doe and John Smith. The trick is quotes: a filter with the rule keywords contain words "John Doe" will find only the keyword "John Doe."


4

Are you wondering about the distinct list of keywords in an entire catalog or are you wondering about the number of keywords for a single image? I am doubtful that there is any practical limit to the number of keywords allowed in a Lightroom catalog. It wouldn't make sense to have an artificial limit in the software itself but it is possible. Lightroom is ...


3

Your question isn't correctly written. I'll try to untangle it, tough. You cannot say that till "n" keywords you won't get any performance degradation and from "n"+1 (ok, "n"+100 or whatever) you suddenly will feel it. The performance degradation is a quite incremental process. It is rather an oblique line and not a stair-like graph. Also, of course, it ...


3

It may take some tweaking to get right, but the command with exiftool would be something like: exiftool -if '$ExposureMode eq "Auto Bracket"' '-Subject+=Bracketed' DIR Replace DIR with the directory you wish to process. This command creates backup files. Add -overwrite_original to suppress the creation of backup files. Add -r to recurse into ...


3

The closest thing I can think of to a single-click method for applying multiple keywords to a photo is to create a metadata preset: In the Metadata panel, pull down the Preset drop-down and say Edit Presets... Click "Check None" to clear any existing preset Scroll almost all the way to the bottom of the list to the Keywords section. Type your keywords into ...


3

The keyword box and keyword field below it work differently. The latter makes it easy to do what you want by inserting comma-separated keywords. Once you press Enter, all the words apply and the image is moved out of the collection but the point is that you can now apply multiple keywords at once. If you really do not like commas, you must change it to ...


2

Most of Jeffrey Friedl's export plugins allow the opportunity to include EXIF data as metadata in the description / caption / keyword fields with tokens. Specifically I use the free (donationware) Metadata Wrangler Plugin. In your case you could use the "Special Keyword Processing" section to add keywords using these tokens on export: {CameraMake} {...


2

If you use the default "without keywords" that installed with lightroom, it is a smart collection, meaning all the photos in the collection match a set of criteria and are included in the collection. As soon as you add the first keyword, the picture will disappear because it has a keyword and no longer matches the criteria for inclusion in the collection. ...


2

Keyword shortcuts can do this, but the downside is that its tied to Keyboard shortcuts, so you will likely run out of keyboard keys to use (and brainpower to remember them all). I do not believe LR does exactly what you are seeking, and perhaps you should send your use case to the LR product team. However, at the risk of disappointing you, here is how you ...


2

Short answer: It can be, depending on what you'll do. Long answer: Usually, from database/storage point of view, the keywords engine is split in two (groups of) tables. Now I'll take in consideration the simplest case with just two tables which will explain pretty clearly (IMHO) the phenomenon. The first (group of) table(s) is the table which holds the ...


2

Unfortunately, there’s currently not a way (in version 3.1.0 for iPhone) to select a group of photos and then apply the same keyword(s) to your selection. However, there is a feature to copy one photo’s keyword(s), and then paste these to other photos in your album, one at a time. Go a photo where you’d like to start. Go to the Keywords view, if you’re ...


2

Solution I think I found the correct rules: The trick is in creating two subgroups, one for bananas and one for oranges and then creating sub-subgroups for those two subgroups. You can get subgroups by holding alt (on a Mac) and then clicking the plus sign + (which turns into a pound sign # when holding alt). This creates a new subrule, allowing you to set ...


2

You can edit individual keyword tags in Lightroom, and set them to 'Include on Export' (the default) or not. In your case, if you edit 'animal' and 'mammal' by right-clicking the keywords and choosing 'Edit keyword tag' you can uncheck this option and it will no longer export. See the screenshot below for an example.


1

Ideally you would write the Lightroom metadata to sidecar XMP files and use those to import all metadata into another non-Adobe application. Unfortunately pick/reject flags are one of the those things that are stored in the catalog only and are not written to XMP1,2. Therefore your proposed solution of using keyword seems to be the best option. To do so, you ...


1

Switching to Library mode from Develop mode, choose ONE image and add selected keywords in "keyword tag" box at right. (Ignore "keyword suggestions" and "keyword list boxes" at this time.) USE COMMMAS to separate each keyword. View multiple images in "Grid View" by clicking on icon at bottom right that looks like a bunch of little boxes, if you don't know ...


1

I think this post may summarize the best solution for my question and is based on all the kind input I received thus far. THE ANSWER The consensus is that LR cannot do what I needed so I combined the many suggestions into a hybrid solution that others may find helpful. Suggested methods: 1.An LR "Keyword Set" displays only 1-9 KWs you have to pick ...


1

There is a plugin called Any Filter by John R. Ellis that allows you to do this kind of search. The plugin is something you would have to buy, but there is no set price; just pay what you think is fair for the added functionality.


1

My workaround is: Do a keyword search for the moved word; Select all the images that come up; On the keywords panel, un-tick the italicised version of the keyword; With the images still selected, tick the moved version of the keyword. Delete the italicised work in the keywords panel. So that way you keep all the images under the correct keyword and delete ...


1

I believe your CSV file will need a couple alterations. First, I don't think Exiftool will read a tab delimited csv. The docs seem to indicate comma separated only. You could import into Excel or OpenOffice with the tab delimiter set and export a new CSV which should be readable to Exiftool. Second, the first line needs to needs to have column headers ...


1

Unfortunately, I think you have two mutually exclusive goals. It is much easier to do this outside Lightroom, by exporting the keywords to a file. It can then be edited in any plain text editor and imported back into LR. Voila! (See https://lightroomkillertips.com/exporting-importing-keyword-list/ for import/export details. See https://photo-keywords.com/...


1

Lightroom uses a SQLite database to hold its keyword information. SQLite does have size limits, but they are so high that it simply isn't worth worrying about them. You can have zillions of keywords in your catalog. HOWEVER. It is not only possible to make Lightroom slow to a crawl, I can do it at will. Heavy keyword use is one of the easiest and most ...


1

You can just re-import the pictures into a new Lightroom catalogue. On Importing the files, you can specify a folder structure and even a filename-pattern, that Lightroom applies while it's importing. To successfully do that, you need to do the following steps: Make sure that all lighroom adjustments are saved to either xmp-sidecar files or into the files ...


1

Avoid using the same word in two different places in the hierarchy. For example, you might have indoor and outdoor keywords, which allow a smart collection to determine whether a photo should also have furniture or nature keywords. Many keywords make sense in only one place in the hierarchy, but some keywords make sense under both indoor and outdoor, such as ...


1

I'd suggest structuring your keywords differently. You're mixing up a few definition concepts together, which is why the hierarchy is getting confused. One of the items a person has is their identity. Another is their relationsihp with you. It'll be less confusing if you build those hierarchies separately: People Names Fred Forsythe Sarah ...


1

Maybe a combination of Keywords and Colors (or Keywords and Ratings) might work if Lightroom's keyword support falls short. For example, you could set up your smart collection to match all the conditions, with the conditions including a Keyword of _shutterstock and a Color of green for accepted. YMMV depending on whether you already have other uses for ...


1

Lightroom doesn't do well with understanding hierarchical keywords for its filters, however you could try setting the collection to match ALL the conditions and have one for _shutterstock and one for _accepted. Any image with the shutterstock accepted keyword will have both shutterstock and accepted since they are nested.


1

You might also take a look at John Ellis' Any Filter plugin. It allows a search that can distinguish an explicit keyword only (the bottom one of the hierarchy, like Place. But then it can also use a criterion "subkeyword of" which I would think you could use to distinguish the places by only finding the subkeyword of "subject matter." But couldn't you just ...


1

When I am faced with such a problem, I put something easier to match in as an un-exported synonym for the keyword: Now I can search for Contains Words → !shotfrom and be certain of finding only photos that are missing a LOCATION keyword, as opposed to a SUBJECT MATTER > Location keyword. That's a little-known trick there, by the way: Contains Words ...


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