36

Your DSLR can do it in about 5 seconds each. You need a tripod, a piece of glass and a decent light. Try to come up with a way to work at table height. Aim the camera straight down. Put a flat board down, and make a right angle of masking tape. You can apply the tape directly to the table if you are absolutely sure it won't pull off the finish. Not a ...


32

Photographic workflow applications such as Adobe Lightroom and Apple's Aperture provide this sort of history as a built in part of their functionality. When you edit a RAW file in these, no changes are ever made to the original image. Instead, they are saved as 'instructions' separately. Thus, you can see a history of all changes made, and with a click ...


31

A photographer that claims an image is complete after taking the picture, is like a doctor saying you are healed after diagnosing your illness - it requires treatment. Use the example of film. Back in the day you used to select your film stock, chemicals, chemical process, paper stock, cropping, and printing methods. These all had huge effects on the ...


31

I'd use a pad of paper or a whiteboard, let them write contact info on it with a marking pen, and take a photo of each person holding it during their photo shoot (like a mug shot). That's what I did for a church directory a while back. Low tech. I probably wouldn't have done it with film, but an extra digital image doesn't cost much.


30

For large collections (in the 1000s) outside services can be very expensive. Especially if you: A) want decent quality, B) don't want them shipped to another country for cheaper processing, and/or C) want to preserve the backs. Setting up a camera like in Sherwood Botsford's answer is rather labor intensive and has drawbacks of getting lighting perfectly ...


25

I'm not sure I ever have images I truly don't care about at all. I'm always for keeping them or against keeping them, at least. My System I use stars and flags in Lightroom: Reject: Photos I will be deleting as soon as I complete the current pass, if I'm at home. I defer deletion when I am working away from home on a laptop. I wait until I have merged ...


19

Adobe's XMP metadata standard supports information defined by the Metadata Working Group (MWG), which includes a definition of how to store face tagged data. See: Adobe XMP: http://www.adobe.com/products/xmp/standards.html MWG: http://www.metadataworkinggroup.com/ where you can click on the specifications, download the PDF, and then look at page 51 ...


17

How does one delete rejected photos from within Darktable Use 'Delete' button (Lightroom mode, right panel, 'Selected Image(s)' module): it "physically deletes" selected images from disk. It helps to display only previously rejected images by setting 'View' filter (Lightroom mode, top panel) to 'rejected only'. For faster use, you can associate a hotkey ...


16

One thing you might try is asking them to show you an example of a great photo that hasn't been "'shopped". If you define it as any photo that wasn't exactly as it appeared when the shutter was actuated, they probably can't. Just as the decisions made in the darkroom had a great effect upon the finished product in the film era, the decisions made at the ...


16

An alternative... If you have considered Sherwood Botsford's answer and it seems like a lot of work...well, you are not wrong, especially for larger archives. Consider finding a service to do this tedious, time-consuming, laborious, boring work for you. ScanCafe (for example) have a "Value Kit" option where they ship you a box, you fill it full of "Paper ...


15

"Better job" is subjective. We certainly get lots of questions like Why does this camera generated JPEG look better than the software generated one? Why do RAW images look worse than JPEGs in editing programs? Why do my RAW pictures look fine in Lightroom preview but become faded when exported? which by their very existence show that many people like the ...


14

Not at all. Lightroom is a great tool with many well-integrated features. Version 4 which is roughly half the price of previous one adds maps, book publishing, soft-proofing to the already useful organization and processing tool. The organization tools are probably worth the price alone and the export feature is the best one I've seen. So what if I don't ...


14

The answers per criterion: In LR go through the photos in the Library module with the Loupe view using the arrow keys. Hit X when you want to discard a photo. To keep the discarded photos from the list click the left and middle flag in the filter bar. I've added a screenshot showing the location of the buttons: This hides the discarded photos from the ...


13

My solution for this was to purchase Lightroom. My reasoning: Lightroom's workflow is an awesome solution for this problem. It's not too expensive (certainly not cheap either though). It's a one time cost that saves be a lot of time. Details... Lightroom allows you to run through and flag your images (Yes/No/Unflagged) using keyboard shortcuts, so I take ...


13

Personally I would say no , do not import back into Lightroom. As you say - you have the originals. And Lightroom does show you by default the 'latest version', so effectively, what you have exported. Just with the option to go back, edit, change, etc.. What I do is have a Lightroom Exports folder with my exported JPG files. I do not clear this out ...


13

My general principles: always work on a copy of your image work on your best images - don't waste time editing all of them, just the ones you want to share/print/pulish work non-destructively where possible (RAW editing, using layers, save intermediate steps if necessary) when you are done, you image shouldn't look "edited" Back up your files Before you ...


12

It sounds like you're fighting Lightroom's natural workflow a bit. Here's my suggestion, which is pretty close to a "standard" workflow for Lightroom: Import your RAW files. As part of the import, you've got the option to move the files to another location -- that would be your external drive. Following the import, then, Lightroom knows about your photos,...


11

Actually, contrary to what other people said, I think there are precisely two rules :). Is it a journalistic photo? If yes, then no editing beyond some crop/contrast/brightness/saturation adjustments. Really, nothing else. If it is not a journalistic photo, then every edit you make should bring the image closer to how you saw the scene in your mind, not ...


10

I have an iPad and I've used it some for photography while traveling, and here's some things I've come up against. With the iPad 2, resolution was limited to 1024×768. The new model's 2048×1536 is much, much better, but the screen is still quite small. Lovely for finger-painting, hard to get precise control for fine work. Can't color calibrate at an OS ...


10

I have actually tested this by separating some of my photos (around 1200) in to another catalogue as I was worried about putting all my eggs in one basked (incase of a failure). I found that there was very little performance increase by doing this, at least, that I could see or measure. My catalogue was ~3100 images in size prior to this. One option I can ...


10

Most cameras allow an image review mode immediately after shooting, and some let you choose to display info overlaying the image, including the image number or file name. Have each person fill out a line on the sign in sheet with their contact info, and leave a column for you to fill in the number of the image for them. If you take multiple shots per ...


9

I like to use the analogy I got from a few folks at Adobe: PS was built by a team of image processing computer science folks and later improved with the addition of a bunch of graphic artist types. There wasn't a clear definition of WHO the product was designed for, photographers, graphic artists, designers; pros or amateurs. Bridge was bolted on the side ...


9

In general - switch to a one program solution like Lightroom. It gives pretty good results (I don't know how it compares to DPP though, but it must be at least comparable given its popularity). It will handle the import, tagging, sorting, labeling, and most of your basic edits to the photo all in one program without keeping multiple copies of the image ...


9

Photography is art. So there are no rules. But to respond to your question in a useful way, I'll need to know what the commenter actually said. If the person who you were discussing this with left you not understanding their point, it sounds like their attempt to help and teach you has failed. Can you get back to them perhaps and ask them to ...


9

Additive vs Subtractive Color Space One thing to think about is that an additive color space (RGB) is different from a subtractive color space (CMYK or others). There are colors you can display that you cannot print, and there are colors that you can print that you cannot display. Notice how some yellows will print, but are not displayable, yet some ...


9

I wrote a script in Python to do the work for me. It's called remove-orphaned-raw-images.py and I published it on Github. Basically it iterates over all the files in a given folder and moves orphaned raw images (in my case *.CR2 files with no matching JPEG) to a backup folder. Optionally you can tell the script to actually delete the files. Here is an ...


9

You might have walked into the trap that I and most others have: we overdo it! Because we have seen the dull, almost monochrome, raw image, developed from default settings, we really feel the need to crank up the "power" (saturation, contrast), to make it vivid like those film posters and arty photos we see all over the place. A good start is to crank it ...


9

"Don't care" photos? I don't edit them at all, so the only way they factor in my workflow is that I don't flag them with anything. Why spend time on something you don't care about? I'd delete them, but then again, I'm a digital packrat who only throws away really bad photos, such as badly focused ones. Maybe you meant photos that are good but not great? ...


9

In this particular situation "Workflow" is less the particular series of edits you apply to a photo and more the entire process from capture -> output. So things to consider in workflow would be: Capture RAW Import, organize, modify metadata, etc in Lightroom Open to Photoshop for aggressive editing Backup to external storage offsite Export to disk and ...


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