15

Lenses have different identification strings depending on how well the camera can identify the lens. For example a Canon lens on an Canon camera may be identified in the EXIF information as EF24-70mm f/2.8L USM, while a Sigma lens on the same camera may be identified as just 50-500mm. The first one can be identified to the exact lens model, while the ...


12

Does anyone know if this software uses the Brown-Conrady model to achieve the lens correction? Yes they do use those very common camera calibration coefficients. I added some copyable text versions of the formulas to the following quote: Adobe Camera Model Geometric Distortion Model for Rectilinear Lenses xd = (1 + k1*r^2 + k2*r^4 + k3*r^6)*x ...


11

When you select multiple photos, the asterisk * indicates that particular keyword has only been applied to a subset of the selection. So, all the photos you've selected have the keywords Bob, mom and grill; only some (or at least one) has the keyword Jane.


8

In the Comparison view you have the "Select" image on the left and "Candidate" image on the right. By clicking on either image you will get a white border/line around the image. It's only this image that the "X" key will act upon, not both. If it's the "Select" image then it will be flagged as rejected, if its the "Candidate" image then it will be flagged ...


6

When you manipulate the tone curve of an image so that both the darkest shadow detail and the brightest highlight detail from a 14-bit RAW file that uses the full dynamic range available is visible at the same time on an 8-bit monitor it tends to "flatten" the image a little. Techniques such as HDR, Exposure fusion, using layers to set different exposure ...


6

Yes the LR5 installer will migrate a LR3 catalog to LR5, automatically. Better yet, the installer will make a copy of your LR3 catalog, and only migrate the copy, so that your original LR3 catalog is left intact, in case there are problems. So have no fear, install LR5 (LR3 install will remain).


6

As from discussion with Per Olso Norway this can happen because of few reasons Setting in the export in LR (see image below) Software, used to upload image strip EXIF information. Original Flickr Uploadr do not do it Some other software in the workflow (xnview for example: Tools->Metadata->Clear)


5

Just to be clear: the clipping warnings and histogram in lightroom are tools for development of photos. Not for analysis of the RAW-files itself. The warnings does (in the best case) warn you if you're clipping in the output format such as JPEG. The histogram works the same regardless of which module you're reviewing it in. In Lightroom the histogram ...


5

You can use ExifTool to generate a GPS track from a bunch of geotagged photos. ExifTool is a command line program, available free for Windows, Mac OS or Linux. See this page for instructions on Inverse Geotagging. That explains how to generate a track in GPX or KML format.


5

Dynamic range is defined as the distance between the highlight clipping point and the noise floor. You can easily see where the highlight clipping point is in Lightroom by turning on the highlight clipping warning (the triangle in the top right corner of the histogram). You can visualize the noise floor (the point where shadow details is lost to noise) by ...


5

Open one picture in Develop mode Set the (relative) adjustment you want to one picture. Ctrl-Shift-C (Copy Settings) and check at least White Balance. Return to Grid view and select multiple pictures to which you want to apply the same relative adjustment. Press Ctrl-Shift-V (Paste Settings). Now all select images will have the relative White Balance ...


5

Lightroom offers three ways to (automatically) set an import destination (I'm using Lightroom 2015.8 but I'm quite sure it worked like that before): Normally Lightroom saves the destination folder if you chose 'into one folder'-Option at the 'destination' panel of the import dialog (you need to import a few pictures once though). The next time you open the ...


4

I agree with AJ's answer, but wanted to throw one more important thing out: you will find flaws in your system and eventually modify it. That's not to say there's something wrong with your plan -- just that as your familiarity with Lightroom grows and as you see ways to better expedite and as your photography changes, you're going to recognize improvements ...


4

To answer the question in the title: Because not every photo has chromatic aberration, and therefore not everyone wants to enable the fix. Also, since automatic defringing looks for fringe colors to remove, it may actually desaturate parts which are of this color but not fringed, even though this is not very likely. So you would need to go to the menu ...


4

Sort of. In the Library grid view select the photos you want to edit. Then on the right panel look for the "Quick Develop" area. You can decrease clarity and a few other attributes.


3

In general these operations are simply not possible to perform losslessly on a JPEG. Rotations are only mathematically possible when both the height and width of the JPEG are multiples of 8 or 16 pixels depending on chroma subsampling. You can read more about it here and here. If a website claims something else it's simply not true. Regarding the other ...


3

I have LR5 and just tried this and it didn't complain to me, but you could try this script provided by Adobe (for use with LR4, but maybe it still works).


3

It does not show clipping in the raw file, it shows clipping on what you have generated from it. You will see that if you decrease the exposure or the highlights slider, the red area will change its size. One way to see clipping in raw files (and dozens of other things) is to get a copy of RawDigger. Highly recommended, btw.


3

Can you run the catalog on a NAS? Yes, you can. Does Lightroom (or Adobe) support this? No. The primary reason is likely because the Lightroom database can't be accessed from two different machines at the same time. There are temp files and other items in transit that the application depends on that would likely get corrupted if another machine attempted to ...


3

User order is quite ephemeral and I recommend you to avoid using it. One day something happens (disk fails, lightroom update, copy folder, etc.) and you loose your precious custom sorting. Instead, after you sort the photos as you do today you should: Select the photos you just finished ordering; Batch rename the photos (by pressing F2 or going to Edit > ...


3

Assuming you mean "Edit Pins" when writing "dot handle", you can turn those on in the bottom left of the image frame: Alternatively you can press H to toggle the edit pins.


3

The closest thing I can think of to a single-click method for applying multiple keywords to a photo is to create a metadata preset: In the Metadata panel, pull down the Preset drop-down and say Edit Presets... Click "Check None" to clear any existing preset Scroll almost all the way to the bottom of the list to the Keywords section. Type your keywords into ...


3

Off the top of my head (I'm assuming you mean stacking feature within the filmstrip, not the computational photography techniques which you cannot do in plain Lightroom-5): I sometimes use stacks simply to have less scrolling to do in the filmstrip. It is useful, for examples, when you have shot 360° panoramas where the frames overlap to some amount and ...


3

There are several times when I find this useful: When shooting RAW+JPEG, I stack them together. Auto-Stacking gets this perfectly since these files have exactly the same time-stamp. Note that on some modes, Lightroom only shows one or the other, so be sure to select Treat RAW and JPEG as Separate Files. When shooting a subject, I sometimes end up with ...


3

I use stacking purely for images that will (or have been) merged into a HDR image (either within Lightroom or externally with e.g. Enfuse) or a panorama image (again, either within Lightroom or externally with e.g. Hugin). I'll have the final composite image as the top image in the stack, meaning that I only ever see the originals if I choose to open the ...


3

I can't speak specifically about LR, but many raw processing applications don't use one of several generic mathematical models (such as Brown-Conrady) that are based on an assumption of rotational symmetry at all if the lens used is a fairly popular one. Instead they use a calibrated correction profile to correct for the measured distortion of the lens at ...


3

Unless you have the originals you will only be able to extract the preview images, which will be of lower quality. Adobe has a script which can do the extraction here. Adobe notes that The extracted previews don't contain any metadata from the original image. (And) The extracted previews don't contain an ICC profile. So, if you import the extracted ...


2

I can't image why Canon's Digital Photo Professional was included with a Sony NEX-5R. It won't open any of the RAW files from the Sony. On the other hand, with RAW files from a Canon DSLR DPP does have some advantages over other third party software for use as a RAW conversion application: The demosaicing algorithms are based on Canon's knowledge of the ...


2

For suggestions on your particular workflow, categories seem to be wasting some of the things at your disposal. You can see if developments have been applied to an image by an icon that lightroom adds itself, so your use of pick isn't needed. Red/Yellow - both of these are really doing the same thing as stars. It is expressing how much value the photos ...


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