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27

I bought a separate GPS unit for my camera and use it extensively. Actually, I keep it pretty much permanently attached on the hot-shoe mount and have my pictures geo-tagged by default. I have a hard time imagining why you wouldn't want it. I take a lot of outdoor pictures and am anal about keeping records. For years before I had this camera, I'd look ...


11

Photoshop Lightroom does this with the "map" tab. Here is an example of my shots mapped with it: You can download a free trial from Adobe or purchase it for $100-150USD.


10

The answer is simpler than you think. GPS is not included because the manufacturer does not feel it would sell more cameras. It's the same reason they skimp on camera straps. If it does not sell more cameras, it is not needed, the manufacturer can sell it for less - even just a bit less - or pocket the difference. Personally I could not care less about in-...


10

Is it just to record metadata on the image so you know where the photo was taken, like if you took a picture of a waterfall or something? Yup, that's pretty much it. The GPS unit can geotag your photos in the EXIF metadata as you take them, so you don't have to keep notes of where you took a photo, or sync the geo data from a track file into the photo ...


9

In addition to the points already mentioned, I would add: for posterity. I'm probably more curious than the average monkey, but there are family photos from when I was a kid (or earlier) that I wonder about the location of, and there isn't always somebody around who remembers. It can also come up in other cases where people are looking at old photos that ...


8

The GPS of the Canon 6D does not automatic turn-off while the camera is off by design. In that case you need to disable it by the menu setting (what a shame Canon). Another option, less elegant, is remove the battery everytime you won't use the camera. This is a good practice that not everybody does but in your case it will help too. Maybe in a future Canon ...


8

ExifTool could do this, but the use of negative coordinates might make it a two step procedure depending upon what tags you want to use. XMP gps tags will take negative coordinates, but EXIF gps tags only accept positive numbers and need the directional reference tag to be accurate. First off, there would have to be some changes to CSV. The first row ...


7

Geotag may work for you. It's written in Java and is compatible with a number of OS's. You can even run it from the linked site without actually installing it on your system (insofar as a Java app isn't installed when you run it...) I would recommend that whatever package you decide on that you make backup copies of your image directories until you're ...


7

Yes, it is the time at which the location was determined. That may be a second before the picture was taken, but it could be much more, if for example you are in a canyon and the GPS is unable to make a fix.


7

You can visualize the GPS log on different places. For example Google Maps. Go to in My Maps New map. If you do not see Import you can add layer and there import GPS logs Import. There you can add CSV, KLM, GPX files If you want to convert your log in different format you can use variety of software. I use GPSBabel, you can check this answer This is the ...


6

In recent versions of Windows (Vista or newer), you can do this as standard. Right click on your photo, and click "Properties". On the properties window, select the "Details" tab. At the bottom of that tab, click the option for "Remove Properties and Personal Information". Then that lets you create a copy with all possible properties removed, or select ...


6

It looks like the problem was that you created the NIKON folder inside the DCIM folder, rather than at the root of SD card's filesystem. From the section Updating the A-GPS File (D5300) at the A-GPS file's download center page (the same one you linked to): Copy the file to the "NIKON" folder on the camera memory card using a computer with a built-in ...


6

The procedure I use is: Go to your Google Timeline Select day Click on gear icon, export this day in KML Convert the file to GPX (I use GPSBabel) gpsbabel -w -r -t -i kml -f history.kml -o gpx -F history.gpx Get (if you do not have) Geotag software Install (if you do not have) JVM Start Geotag software Add your images Load track from file Adjust camera ...


5

With regards to EXIF v2.31 (p49) time-zone integration (2016) and XMP time-zone guidelines (p34) it might make sense to look at this problem once more. Local time is important especially in the human-based interaction with pictures. Looking at a sunset photo one expects the clock to show something in the second half of the day, for breakfast photos rather ...


5

I'd love to see a GPS in more (all!) cameras, but that's obviously not happening. My wife had a Nikon P6000, which has a GPS in it. The battery life because of the GPS was horrid. Even though you could adjust how often the GPS would activate, it sucked the battery dry very quickly. Yes, it could be turned off, but if you wanted to use it... well, you should ...


5

You can use ExifTool to generate a GPS track from a bunch of geotagged photos. ExifTool is a command line program, available free for Windows, Mac OS or Linux. See this page for instructions on Inverse Geotagging. That explains how to generate a track in GPX or KML format.


4

To convert a decimal longitude or latitude to degrees (minutes and seconds), simply take the first, whole, number and use it as the degrees. Then multiply the remainder after the decimal point by 60 to get minutes. Continue multiplying the remainder of the minutes by 60 to get seconds of degrees. Your example of -79.06782 would then be: -79 degrees .06782 ...


4

Three options: For a single photo I use Pic2Map as an online solution or Photo GPS Extract as a software, which both utilize EXIF GPS information to map a photo. or For bulk photos, Canon has a software called Map Utility which works with both geotagged photos and also GPS logs from the camera itself:


4

Gpicsync is an open source software that can run in Windows, Linux, or Mac OS. It includes a tool to export your geotagged pictures into a KMZ file. You can then use this KMZ file to create a map in Google Maps (and probably other mapping applications).


4

For Windows, GeoSetter (freeware) can do this. You can select a GPX file, then it will tag the photos based on this. You can also edit tags manually. It can show all of your photos on a map, and set image positions from the map. It has options for saving data in the image files, or as separate sidecar files. It does use ExifTool for saving data.


4

Windows Explorer, conversely to much advice, cannot fully clean GPS metadata, and sometimes cannot recognize it (e.g., pictures taken with a Windows Phone). I suggest you use exiftool, it's probably the best way to do tag management for pictures. It's a command-line tool, although there are also GUIs for it. To remove (EXIF) GPS tags, you should use this ...


4

In my opinion, it's a niche feature for architecture and landscape photography – to keep precise track of where the photo was taken. And to be able coming back there again if necessary – it's pretty easy to find some address in the city, but way harder to find the same rock or path somewhere in wild.. and it can be useful in general: you can see/group your ...


4

GPS data varies wildly in accuracy depending on location. In big cities, GPS can be very inaccurate because of the urban valley effect and the resulting multipath interference. Often, the best location data comes from proximity to Wi-Fi at that point, which can get you moderately close to the right place, but it still won't be all that accurate. Similarly,...


4

According to a blog post and associated comments at Built-in GPS in Nikon D5300, the Nikon D5300 internal GPS is turned off when it is connected to an external GPS, which may include your phone. If you connect your camera to your phone, the camera GPS may be turned off, even if your intention was not to use your phone's GPS. For instance, you could have ...


3

I created a project recently that does exactly this, traverse your Google Photos and outputs a map (kml file). https://bitbucket.org/blackey02/city-log


3

You can use Flickr for this. Simply upload your images to Flickr, and it will Map all those with geotag info. If you prefer software that does this, I highly recommend Photolinker. I use their GPSPhotolinker software, which takes GPS track data (from a GPS device) and matches it with photos via the time stamps, then geotags the images. Photolinker takes all ...


3

It is the offset where the GPS Info is. You have to jump to that offset to read GPS info. EXIF info works the same way. See on the previous line in your example: ExifIFDPointer: 2790


3

Using the webform at http://www.earthpoint.us/Convert.aspx ::: Position 38.018746,-121.26266 <--- Google Maps provides Calculated Values - based on Degrees Lat Long to seven decimal places. Position Type LatLon Degrees Lat Long 38.0187460°, -121.2626600° Degrees Minutes 38°01.12476', -121°15.75960' Degrees Minutes Seconds 38°01'07.4856", -...


3

You need to convert the format, which is simply a floating point number of degrees, into the separate parts for degrees and minutes. And it looks like it wants latitude measurements with the N (north) or S (south). Your example converts to -79° 4' 4.1514" I'm not sure exactly what Bridge wants, probably -79,4.069 I know that Adobe Lightroom 4's "MAP" ...


3

The only answer to this is "Because the marketing department and the accountants compromised. More profits and driving you up the value/cost curve are the aims. GPS costs money. Presumably the model mix is aimed at maximising overall profit. As noted by Dan, GPS tends to be energy hungry. I had grown used to DSLRs that had a standby current not much ...


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