Hot answers tagged

27

I bought a separate GPS unit for my camera and use it extensively. Actually, I keep it pretty much permanently attached on the hot-shoe mount and have my pictures geo-tagged by default. I have a hard time imagining why you wouldn't want it. I take a lot of outdoor pictures and am anal about keeping records. For years before I had this camera, I'd look ...


10

Is it just to record metadata on the image so you know where the photo was taken, like if you took a picture of a waterfall or something? Yup, that's pretty much it. The GPS unit can geotag your photos in the EXIF metadata as you take them, so you don't have to keep notes of where you took a photo, or sync the geo data from a track file into the photo ...


9

In addition to the points already mentioned, I would add: for posterity. I'm probably more curious than the average monkey, but there are family photos from when I was a kid (or earlier) that I wonder about the location of, and there isn't always somebody around who remembers. It can also come up in other cases where people are looking at old photos that ...


8

ExifTool could do this, but the use of negative coordinates might make it a two step procedure depending upon what tags you want to use. XMP gps tags will take negative coordinates, but EXIF gps tags only accept positive numbers and need the directional reference tag to be accurate. First off, there would have to be some changes to CSV. The first row ...


8

The GPS of the Canon 6D does not automatic turn-off while the camera is off by design. In that case you need to disable it by the menu setting (what a shame Canon). Another option, less elegant, is remove the battery everytime you won't use the camera. This is a good practice that not everybody does but in your case it will help too. Maybe in a future Canon ...


8

Yes, it is the time at which the location was determined. That may be a second before the picture was taken, but it could be much more, if for example you are in a canyon and the GPS is unable to make a fix.


7

In recent versions of Windows (Vista or newer), you can do this as standard. Right click on your photo, and click "Properties". On the properties window, select the "Details" tab. At the bottom of that tab, click the option for "Remove Properties and Personal Information". Then that lets you create a copy with all possible properties removed, or select ...


7

The procedure I use is: Go to your Google Timeline Select day Click on gear icon, export this day in KML Convert the file to GPX (I use GPSBabel) gpsbabel -w -r -t -i kml -f history.kml -o gpx -F history.gpx Get (if you do not have) Geotag software Install (if you do not have) JVM Start Geotag software Add your images Load track from file Adjust camera ...


7

You can visualize the GPS log on different places. For example Google Maps. Go to in My Maps New map. If you do not see Import you can add layer and there import GPS logs Import. There you can add CSV, KLM, GPX files If you want to convert your log in different format you can use variety of software. I use GPSBabel, you can check this answer This is the ...


6

It looks like the problem was that you created the NIKON folder inside the DCIM folder, rather than at the root of SD card's filesystem. From the section Updating the A-GPS File (D5300) at the A-GPS file's download center page (the same one you linked to): Copy the file to the "NIKON" folder on the camera memory card using a computer with a built-in ...


5

You can use ExifTool to generate a GPS track from a bunch of geotagged photos. ExifTool is a command line program, available free for Windows, Mac OS or Linux. See this page for instructions on Inverse Geotagging. That explains how to generate a track in GPX or KML format.


5

With regards to EXIF v2.31 (p49) time-zone integration (2016) and XMP time-zone guidelines (p34) it might make sense to look at this problem once more. Local time is important especially in the human-based interaction with pictures. Looking at a sunset photo one expects the clock to show something in the second half of the day, for breakfast photos rather ...


4

Windows Explorer, conversely to much advice, cannot fully clean GPS metadata, and sometimes cannot recognize it (e.g., pictures taken with a Windows Phone). I suggest you use exiftool, it's probably the best way to do tag management for pictures. It's a command-line tool, although there are also GUIs for it. To remove (EXIF) GPS tags, you should use this ...


4

Three options: For a single photo I use Pic2Map as an online solution or Photo GPS Extract as a software, which both utilize EXIF GPS information to map a photo. or For bulk photos, Canon has a software called Map Utility which works with both geotagged photos and also GPS logs from the camera itself:


4

For Windows, GeoSetter (freeware) can do this. You can select a GPX file, then it will tag the photos based on this. You can also edit tags manually. It can show all of your photos on a map, and set image positions from the map. It has options for saving data in the image files, or as separate sidecar files. It does use ExifTool for saving data.


4

In my opinion, it's a niche feature for architecture and landscape photography – to keep precise track of where the photo was taken. And to be able coming back there again if necessary – it's pretty easy to find some address in the city, but way harder to find the same rock or path somewhere in wild.. and it can be useful in general: you can see/group your ...


4

GPS data varies wildly in accuracy depending on location. In big cities, GPS can be very inaccurate because of the urban valley effect and the resulting multipath interference. Often, the best location data comes from proximity to Wi-Fi at that point, which can get you moderately close to the right place, but it still won't be all that accurate. Similarly,...


4

According to a blog post and associated comments at Built-in GPS in Nikon D5300, the Nikon D5300 internal GPS is turned off when it is connected to an external GPS, which may include your phone. If you connect your camera to your phone, the camera GPS may be turned off, even if your intention was not to use your phone's GPS. For instance, you could have ...


4

You can use geotag software. This is java software and should run on your Mac machine. Load photos (drag and drop may work) In case of need you can adjust time/timezone of photos Then File->Load tracks from file Select images you want to write location Right click, Save new location->Selected images


3

I created a project recently that does exactly this, traverse your Google Photos and outputs a map (kml file). https://bitbucket.org/blackey02/city-log


3

Are you checking the original image, or something that you've exported? if you've exported (it appears that you have based on the file location in your screenshots) note that you need to check the "Location Information" box on the Export dialog of Photos. Once exported with location metadata, exiftool --groupname [file] will show you just what you expect to ...


3

Yes, having GPS turned on will drain the battery pretty quickly. This is true of any camera, not just the D5300. Not much you can do about it if you want your photos GPS tagged. If you turn GPS off, you should find that the D5300 has pretty much the same battery life as your D3100: 600 shots for the D5300 vs 550 shots for the D3100. Camera battery life is ...


3

That would be quite difficult. The photographer would need to: Upload the photo to a public site (Website, flickr, instagram, etc...). If they just post it to their Facebook, you may need to be friends with them (or tehir friends) to find/see it. have geolocation (which phones have, but many cameras still do not) or manually tag the image with the location. ...


3

You are correct in assuming that is uses the time to match to the photos. The accuracy will be determined by how often you set the app to log your location, so if you need high accuracy without running your battery down really quick (i.e. by logging too often) just use the Log now option whenever you take the camera out to take a photo, this will save the ...


3

I run an app on my phone that logs GPS positions and use the exif time stamps on the images to sync later on a PC with a script that writes the GPS coordinates to the image files.


3

Google Location History KML files may be downloaded from: Google Timeline, as RomeoNinov describes. The problem with these files is the timestamps and trackpoints are spread too far apart for some software to interpolate. Google Takeout. Takeout KML files appear to have altitude information and more frequent recordings than the Timeline KML files. Geotags ...


3

The last row on your display indicates the camera doesn't have any satellite signal reception. Are you outside with a clear view of the sky? If you are outside with GPS enabled and have waited more than a minute but still show no signal in the GPS reception signal status, then your camera may need service. I've tested both my 5D IV (which has built-in GPS)...


3

In a nutshell1 AGPS (Assisted/Augmented GPS) is a method to help a GPS device determine the position of the GPS satellites by supplying pre-computed data. The data itself changes in time due to the fact that the satellites themselves change in position over time in a manner that can't be expressed by a simple formula directly implemented by the GPS device ...


3

I can't explain what is happening exactly with Flickr but I can help fix some of the details with the problem. You cannot set a timezone for the GPS time stamps (GPS:GPSDateStamp and GPS:GPSTimeStamp) because the GPS time stamps are required to be in UTC. It will always be +00:00. The reason why your example GPS command fails is because the GPS coordinates ...


2

I have used http://www.photoplace.io. It loads your photos and it can create a kmz file for Google Earth, it was really easy.


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