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I’m asking this because I recently got my hands on a Fujifilm Discovery 90 and bought some new Fujicolor ISO 200 Color Negative Film from Walmart to go along with it. I would like to know if its compatible before I open the packaging.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Why do you think it might be incompatible? \$\endgroup\$
    – Chenmunka
    Dec 15, 2022 at 16:29
  • \$\begingroup\$ Part of it is my inexperience with photography and what exactly ISO means, the other part is that im having a hard time finding a digital version of the user manual for an accurate description of what ISO setting i should be using and just generally unsure if modern film is the “same” as older film \$\endgroup\$
    – morenitoo
    Dec 15, 2022 at 17:22
  • \$\begingroup\$ The last time ISO film speeds were changed was 1960, when ASA redefined their testing and most films gained one full stop of ASA speed (ASA is the first number in the ISO speed). \$\endgroup\$
    – Zeiss Ikon
    Dec 15, 2022 at 18:34
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    \$\begingroup\$ The Discovery 90 was known outside the US as the DL-95 Super. It's from around 1993 apparently. A date version was called the DL-95 Super Date. It may help in trying to find your manual. \$\endgroup\$
    – osullic
    Dec 15, 2022 at 23:08
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    \$\begingroup\$ @morenitoo Keep in mind that with film, setting the ISO speed only affects calibration of the light meter and automatic exposure routines. It has absolutely no effect on the sensitivity of the film. This may seem rather obvious, but folks who try film after having only shoot digital sometimes don't intuitively grasp this. \$\endgroup\$
    – Michael C
    Dec 16, 2022 at 4:39

1 Answer 1

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The only "incompatibility" you might encounter is the lack of DX coding on some modern film cassettes for a camera that depends on DX (like some '90s vintage point and shoot models) without having any provision for manual ISO speed setting and an inconvenient default speed.

With very old cameras (or fixed-settings types, "focus free" and no aperture or shutter control), you might also run into limitations on the film speed the camera is designed to use (likely ISO 50-100 for pre-1960 models, or ISO 400 for those newer than about 1990) and the film speed you actually have.

Physically, however, any 35 mm camera from a 1930s vintage Leica or Contax to a brand new Kodak H35 will accept the standard cassettes and the film will be compatible with the advance and frame counter system, assuming everything is in good condition and functional.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Is the lack of DX coding going to be an issue when i get the film developed? \$\endgroup\$
    – morenitoo
    Dec 15, 2022 at 17:24
  • \$\begingroup\$ Shouldn't be. The film you linked is C-41, and all C-41 processes are (should be!) the same. \$\endgroup\$
    – Zeiss Ikon
    Dec 15, 2022 at 18:33
  • \$\begingroup\$ For that matter, that film probably has DX code on the cassettes. \$\endgroup\$
    – Zeiss Ikon
    Dec 15, 2022 at 18:35
  • \$\begingroup\$ You’re right! I checked the box and there is a DX label on there, thanks a lot for your help! \$\endgroup\$
    – morenitoo
    Dec 15, 2022 at 22:08
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    \$\begingroup\$ Also worth noting, the foam on the inside of the film door around the reminder window (where you can see the cassette with the door closed) can deteriorate and cause light leaks. Might be a good idea to cover that window with black tape or get some black craft foam to make a new foam gasket. \$\endgroup\$
    – Zeiss Ikon
    Dec 16, 2022 at 12:03

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