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I would like to know how to get this particular effect in photoshop.

enter image description here

closed as unclear what you're asking by Caleb, mattdm, Philip Kendall, TFuto, inkista Jan 15 '16 at 16:17

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • The skin tone,and the color.This particular black and white photo effect is seen in many photos.i would oike to know how to achieve this. – sohaib shaikh Jan 15 '16 at 7:12
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    Please take a look at this advice on asking about effects. I don't see a particular effect so much as a well-lit, medium contrast black and white photo. It might help to provide another example of the effect, or a photo that lacks the effect you see. – Caleb Jan 15 '16 at 8:16
  • Probably he is refering to the gray instead of a white point. – Rafael Jan 15 '16 at 15:56
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I would like to know how to get this particular effect in photoshop.

Images such as the example in this question aren't primarily about the post processing - they're about lighting the scene to get the look you want when shooting it. There are no real post processing "tricks" to take a high key portrait and make it look like a well lit low key portrait. Nor are there any "tricks" to take a low key portrait and make it look like a well lit high key portrait. Things that can be effective in post processing, such as killing the ambient are still dependant upon the light in the scene being in the proper ratios. You can't kill the ambient in post on an area that is brighter than the subject you wish to remain illuminated, at least not without doing a ton of very time consuming masking and layering that will make the whole thing look a lot worse than if you had just shot it correctly in the beginning. The same goes for producing a featureless pure white background.

As to the particular lighting needed to get a result similar to your example photo: Use a large, evenly distributed light source (such as a picture window) on one side of the frame, a light background behind, a mirror in front (to shoot your own reflection) and no light sources or reflectors overhead or to the other side of the frame.

  • With a bit of practice, it's actually easier to achieve these types of shots in camera, rather than in post-processing. – Steve Ives Jul 15 '16 at 13:22
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  1. Start with a big window on the right side for a large, natural light source.
  2. Have a black sheet or similar on the side of the model away from the lights to kill all reflections, as there is no lighting on the model's left side.
  3. Use a fast lens, as DOF is pretty shallow.
  4. Experiment & practice.
  • If he is shooting himself in a mirror, wouldn't the light be to his left? :-) – Michael C Jan 15 '16 at 14:39
  • Indeed... but it doesn;t really matter :-) – Steve Ives Jan 15 '16 at 14:46

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