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I am using a Nikon d5500 with Nikor 18-55 br lens. I was able to get some great photos outside during one set of shots. I noticed since then, when I use the zoom magnifying feature on the lcd, all of my photos are not sharp and blurred when I review. Ive taken them into photoshop and at 100% 300 dpi at roughly 10x14" they aren't sharp. I've tried different setting and am reading about user error but is there a way to test the camera with a still shot? I am using vr on and af on the lens, also tried different settings raw, raw +jpg, large, and fine settings.

marked as duplicate by mattdm, NickM, Hugo, inkista, Michael C Oct 21 '15 at 22:25

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    Why do you expect your photos to be sharp under such close magnification? What are you doing to ensure maximum sharpness when you take the pictures? – mattdm Oct 21 '15 at 12:43
  • Thank you for the info. I just want the photos to print clear at 8x10". When I bring them into photoshop and review at 100% at 300 dpi and roughly 10x14" there is no area of the focal point that is crisp. Wondering if it's the setting I used- raw. When I review on the lcd (which I know isn't very accurate) they look good until the last 2 or 3 magnifications. I'm sure it is a setting or something I'm not understanding. I will try to post an image with info used today. Thank you for the replies, I appreciate the knowledge and help. – user45797 Oct 21 '15 at 14:34
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    "100%" and "300 dpi" in the same sentence... Something is indeed terribly wrong ! – Olivier Oct 21 '15 at 20:47
  • It is not likely that a setting is your issue. Most likely is that it is camera motion and focus error. – Michael C Oct 21 '15 at 21:57
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To test your camera with a still shot, you should:

  • Mount the camera on a tripod
  • Make sure that VR is off
  • Pick a well-lit subject (so that it is easier to focus and check the pictures)
  • Ensure the subject is in focus
  • Use the mirror lock-up feature of your camera (see manual)

When checking the shot later, ensure that you are checking in an area that is in focus.

While this should help and answer the question, I would like to add that the question is not relevant at all for general purpose photography in my opinion. Unless you are doing scientific stuff with these shots on the pixel level (which you would not do with that camera), the sharpness of single pixels does not matter.

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    Even more basic : taking a picture of an inclined (wrt lens optical axis) ruler – Olivier Oct 21 '15 at 20:50

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