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Nikon D7200

Aperture Priority Mode.

Auto ISO set at 6400 max.

Minimum Shutter set at 1/125.

Flash: Godox V860IIN.

Shutter works well when the flash is off and when the built in camera is on, but when I turn on the off-camera flash, the shutter goes below 1/125 even way before the ISO hits the 6400 max.

Problem Solved.

I was using Rear Curtain. Using Fill Flash solved the problem.

Thanks everyone - especially to @WayneF.

  • 2
    How are the camera and off camera flash communicating? – Michael C Aug 16 '18 at 16:31
  • 1
    Might as well know what flash you are using as well? – Hueco Aug 16 '18 at 17:03
  • Attached to the Shoe. I used i-TTL, Manual, and RPT. – Ares Aug 16 '18 at 21:02
  • The off-camera flash is Godox V860IIN. – Ares Aug 16 '18 at 21:17
  • Are you triggering the V860IIN with your D7200's pop-up flash? Or a radio transmitter? If you're using optical slaving, are you using S1/S2? Or the "lightning-bolt" slave mode? If you're radio triggering, what on-camera transmitter unit are you using? – inkista Aug 17 '18 at 23:50
1

The D7200 manual says that in A or P modes, the ISO menu Minimum Shutter Speed is the threshold concerning if ISO increases or not.

It does also say that in Auto Mode that the camera will choose Minimum Shutter Speed based on focal length, but that is only Auto mode.

But also, page 104 of the free larger D7200 Reference Manual also says that if flash is used, Minimum Shutter Speed will be set to either the E1 or E2 menu, as applicable (E1 flash sync speed, E2 slowest flash shutter speed in A or P mode).

In general though... Auto ISO action is this:

In A mode, as the light becomes more dim, the shutter speed drops to maintain proper exposure. When the shutter speed hits this ISO Minimum Shutter Speed, then the shutter speed is frozen there, and the ISO increases instead. However, when the ISO hits the Maximum ISO specified, the camera still must try to maintain a proper exposure, so then the shutter speed must drop even more.

In A mode, this ISO Minimum Shutter Speed should be given careful consideration, because, any time ISO is actively changing (anytime between Minimum and Maximum ISO), this is the shutter speed that will be used, every time.

But for D7200, if flash, then also see E1 and E2 menus, per that page 104.

  • My minimum shutter setting works well with the built-in flash but not with the Godox V860IIN off-camera flash. – Ares Aug 16 '18 at 21:20
  • Flashes can be triggered, but for the cameras flash features to work, the camera and flash must be able to communicate, in order to even recognize that the flash is present. Nikon CLS is the communication system with compatible flashes. Your N-option flash is surely compatible if on the hot shoe, but non-Nikon radio triggers or the dumb PC sync cord are not CLS compatible. Flashes can be triggered, even without the camera system knowing they are present. But camera features like iTTL, HSS, or even maximum sync speed or minimum shutter speed are not honored unless they can communicate. – WayneF Aug 16 '18 at 21:55
  • That observation is while the Godox is mounted on the hot shoe. So far, the Godox V860IIN seems to be communicating well with my Nikon D7200 except honouring the minimum shutter speed settings. It has worked as a Slave with the in-camera flash with the built-in flash Firing and just as a Commander. – Ares Aug 16 '18 at 23:16
  • It confuses if you call it an off-camera flash when it is in fact on the hot shoe. If the camera recognizes a flash is present, E1 and E2 should work as expected. Except if your D7200 has Slow Sync or Rear Curtain sync selected in A or P modes, then the minimum shutter speed E2 is ignored, which allows the likely even slower shutter speed, whatever slow speed that the dim indoor ambient actually meters is what it does then (Minimum ignored). Except Reference manual page 104 implies Auto ISO will still try to keep the shutter speed up then, until Maximum ISO. – WayneF Aug 17 '18 at 1:19
  • Rear Curtain was on when I tested the minimum shutter. Shutter stayed at 1/125 with the built-in flash and went below 1/125 with the Godox mounted on the Hot Shoe. – Ares Aug 17 '18 at 1:58
0

The D7200 has to keep the mechanical shutter open to sync with the flash. You can enable higher shutter speeds, up to 1/320 second for the internal flash, or 1/250 second for compatible external flash units, by setting (1/320) Auto FP from the e1 Flash Sync speed menu item.

  • The Godox Flash and Nikon D7200 has been Synced to shoot at high speed up to 1/8000. I used (1/320) Auto FP for that. The problem is, the minimum shutter speed that I set is not being honoured when the Godox Flash is on. – Ares Aug 16 '18 at 23:31
  • Is it "compatible"? If Nikon does not define it so, then it stands to reason it syncs slower. – DrMoishe Pippik Aug 17 '18 at 19:04
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There are two situations where this may occur:

1) The focal length of your lens is fairly wide. The camera will allow you to use shutter speeds below 1/125 if your lens is wide-angle enough to be handheld at that slower shutter speed.

2) You have the slow sync feature enabled. This will allow the camera to select any shutter speed necessary to properly record the ambient background light.

If you want to ensure that your camera gets a certain shutter speed, simply shoot on manual mode, selecting an aperture that is within the capability of your flash given the subject distance. Alternatively, you can shoot in shutter priority mode, and the auto-ISO feature will crank up the ISO if wide open at your base ISO isn't giving sufficient light to the sensor.

  • I shoot Manual with Auto ISO on for quick shots and Full Manual when I want to be more Creative. I’m trying out different Aperture Priority Settings so that it will be easier for other people to use the camera when I ask them to take a picture (of me). That is when I stumbled over the minimum shutter not being honoured when the Godox Flash is on. – Ares Aug 16 '18 at 23:28
  • @Ares Shutter priority, then. Or program mode, perhaps. But shutter priority mode will guarantee you have 1/125 sec., and your camera will go wide open at whatever ISO it needs to do that, unless there's enough light to let it stop down. – Jim MacKenzie Aug 16 '18 at 23:59

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