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I've been shooting for a while now and learning my way through post processing. I really would love to have my photos come out with the look from the photo above. Can anyone point me in the direction to develop this style? I don't know too much about the specific techniques but I want to mirror my portraits in the post processing stage to reflect the smooth and glowing skin detail.

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    Please read Important information for asking "What's this effect?" questions and edit this post accordingly. Make sure to use a descriptive title, too. Thank you! – mattdm Jun 6 '17 at 20:05
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    Welcome to the site! We have no idea what "this look" you are trying to achieve is. Is it the color, depth of field, lighting, makeup, pose, background...? Please describe in more detail exactly what you are having trouble achieving, and if possible an example image that you have tried already on and aren't getting the results you would like. – dpollitt Jun 6 '17 at 20:07
  • I'm sorry about the original post being to vague, I'm just not knowledgeable yet when it comes to the post processing terminology. What I like about the photo is the color pop, the glowing effect, and the smooth detail on the skin. Hopefully that helps. – Carmelo Sosa Jun 7 '17 at 1:12
  • I hate that kind of processing, it always makes the person look like they're made of plastic... – fkraiem Jun 7 '17 at 19:26
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    @CarmeloSosa if by "glowing" skin you mean highlights on her lips, nose, shoulder etc., then it's not processing, it's studio lighting coupled with a make-up artist's work. The smoothness is primarily a feature of the model herself, multiplied by a lot of retouching, dodging and burning. As mostly the case in photography, it's not about post-processing, it's mainly about photographing. Post-processing is putting a cherry on a cake, but you have to make a cake first. – lightproof Jun 8 '17 at 17:40
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Beyond the makeup and lighting, you can enhance the skin 'glow' effect in post-processing by using a mask on the skin and apply a Gaussian blur. The mask should avoid lips, eyes, and nostrils. Gaussian blur is typically much easier than using 'healing brushes' to fix most skin imperfections, by the way.

Don't use too large of a radius on the blur, or else the above-mentioned "plastic" effect will become evident.

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