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I was researching for a lens specially for architectural and interior shots including full room for real estate photography. My camera is a canon Eos 1200D and was advised to get Sigma 50mm f1.4 EX DG HSM - Canon Fit. The picture on the right is the basic kit lens and on the left is the sigma. I am quite confused since I was advised that this wide angle lens will give capture way more of a room then the basic kit lens. I'd be grateful for any advise, thanks in advanceenter image description here

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    \$\begingroup\$ Who advised you so? And why do you think the 50mm lens is a "wide-angle lens"? It is not. Either... you misunderstood the recommendations, or the person making the recommendations was entirely mixed up themselves. \$\endgroup\$
    – osullic
    Feb 1 at 22:48
  • \$\begingroup\$ I have to say - you could probably inform yourself quite easily on this subject through some basic research. E.g. a few simple YouTube searches. Can you indicate what research you've done? Again, sorry to be pedantic about it, but the site and community expect that you've done a bit of digging before coming to ask a question. This is ultimately to help you to help yourself. \$\endgroup\$
    – osullic
    Feb 1 at 22:56
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    \$\begingroup\$ It was a shop selling photography equipment, rather a well known one actually.. i choose the latter; he told me word-for-word what to get.... \$\endgroup\$ Feb 1 at 22:56
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    \$\begingroup\$ Possible confusion. If you told them you want to shoot indoors, they understood "not much light" so recommended a fast lens, instead of a wide one. \$\endgroup\$
    – xenoid
    Feb 2 at 0:08
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    \$\begingroup\$ if you specifically stated that you need to photograph whole rooms and shop suggested getting 50mm for 1200D then they are very incompetent \$\endgroup\$ Feb 2 at 11:01

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Your basic kit lens probably covers the 18-55mm focal length range.

50mm is very near 55mm, so the Sigma 50mm f/1.4 is going to look a lot like the 18-55 kit lens zoomed all the way in. This is not wide angle. It would be 80mm-equivalent, or a short telephoto, and would be better used as a portrait lens, not real estate.

If you needed something wider than an 18-55 can zoom out, you need a shorter focal length than 18mm. For example, something like the EF-S 10-18mm f/3.5-5.6 crop ultrawide zoom lens or the Tokina 11-20mm or 11-22mm f/2.8. There are also primes like the Samyang/Rokinon 10mm f/2.8, but with real estate, where you may not know what size room you're going to be shooting and how much space you're going to have, a zoom lens would probably be handier than a prime.

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50mm is not wide angle lens. This is counted as middle of the range (on full frame, on your crop is more like short telefoto lens). For your camera (crop sensor) lens like Canon EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM will be counted as wide angle lens.

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I have no idea what you mean by "I was advised that this wide angle lens will give capture way more of a room then the basic kit lens". Wide angle means that you can capture way more of a room than the basic kit lens does.

And indeed, the photograph on the right captures way more of the room than the photograph on the left does, with the left photograph just showing a few steps and the right photograph showing the whole stairway and part of the corridor.

This ability to capture a lot even when you cannot step back a lot before hitting into a wall is what makes wide angle lenses desirable for interior architecture.

To capture a whole room from a corner (such that the adjacent walls to the corner are both just shy of being in the frame) you need 18mm full-frame equivalent or lower. For your camera (crop factor 1.6) this would translate to 11mm and lower.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks for your reply, I see I made a mistake. The picture on the right was from the basic kit lens whereas the picture on the left was from the 'wide angle lens' however it proved to be incorrect as its showing much less than the basic kit lens. I was advised by a shop that sells photography equipment and they advised me to go with the Sigma \$\endgroup\$ Feb 1 at 20:36
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The number in front of the 'mm' is the focal length, basically how much of the field of view is your lens going to capture. Back in the day of 35mm film, a rule of thumb was that 50mm closely matched the field of view that your eye can see (all the stuff you can see basically), but your camera effectively doesn't match your eye, such that a 35mm lens more closely matches what you can see. So if you are happy with what you can see, 35mm is a good option. But if you want to see more than you can see, you need to choose a lens with a smaller number in the focal length, such as 17mm or 12mm or 10mm.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks, so what would you recommend for capturing rooms for real estate? i.e I want to see the max possible. \$\endgroup\$ Feb 1 at 20:39
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    \$\begingroup\$ I never really liked this analogy comparing normal lenses to human vision. Of course human vision takes in an enormous angle - much wider than what a 50mm lens captures. Extend your arms so that they are at the edge of your peripheral vision - what angle do they subtend? I would estimate something not actually too far off 180°. But of course we don't focus on the whole peripheral vision all the time - and this is where the normal lens comparison comes into play. Still, it just seems rather arbitrary to me, and I hate to repeat it. \$\endgroup\$
    – osullic
    Feb 1 at 22:53
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Deereflected on my APS-C camera, I used a 10-20mm lens, which I found worked well for most architecture. I had lenses that ranged from 10- 85, which was perfect for every kind of composure. If you REALLY are serious about architecture photos, look at Canon's tilt-shift line, which are available in 24mm and 17mm. Google tilt shift lens to learn more. \$\endgroup\$
    – cmason
    Feb 2 at 14:05
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks everyone for your helpful responses! \$\endgroup\$ Feb 4 at 1:05

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