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Some people did not look good in picture . Is it natural or passing issue ?

closed as unclear what you're asking by mattdm, Romeo Ninov, Philip Kendall, scottbb, ths Nov 16 '18 at 20:38

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    Can you define what is "perfect picture"? And why you think it's need something to be perfect all the time? – Romeo Ninov Nov 16 '18 at 19:38
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    Are you asking why some people do not seem to be naturally photogenic? – mattdm Nov 16 '18 at 19:42
  • Yes .I am asking about people do not seem to be naturally photogenic or they having some posing issue? – Attique khan Nov 16 '18 at 19:44
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    I don't see how we can answer this question without seeing the picture that you're talking about. – Tanner Swett Nov 16 '18 at 20:13
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    "passing" or "posing"? which do you mean? – ths Nov 16 '18 at 20:39
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I am asking about people do not seem to be naturally photogenic or they having some posing issue?

In addition to what Aperture Life wrote, I'll just say that beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Not every person's image will appeal to every other person. If you're shooting a portrait, your job is to create an image that will appeal to your subject. Use posing and lighting to highlight their "best side" so to speak.

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Generally, people find good looking people to have good symmetry in their face and body. Now people that are less photogenic typically lack that symmetry, but depending on the angle and side that someone is photographed, may look better or worse. Using these angles creates better or worse angles on a person which gives the impression of symmetry.

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What I often find is that some people's skin color does not translate well into the world of cameras. This mostly affects relatively pale persons.

What I find is that "unphotogenic" people often get a magenta-ish tint that I suspect comes from their dermis that "shines through" the epidermis. This effect gets even stronger when one uses high-power flash lights.

While I have not done any scientific studies on the subject, I once took sets of photos from two siblings - one blonde, one brunette - in the exact same set-up, where the brunette sibling's photos looked fantastic out of the box, while the blonde sibling's photos had this issue.

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