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I recently dropped my new Sigma Art 1.8 14mm lens (and 5dii). The lens has some pretty bad cosmetic damage and a few small scratches on the front element. But overall it would still be usable if I could get the focus to work (either auto or manual) since I just want it for landscape. I would greatly appreciate any suggestions on how I can get it going. I have attempted to take it apart but couldn't even get the first piece off due to a data cable/ribbon attached to it that I couldn't remove. Any suggestions hoe to fix the AF/MF??

P.S. A repair shop have already said this lens is a write off... unfortunately they gave absolutely no reasoning or parts/labour in the paperwork.

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    This is probably one of those, if you have to ask if you can fix, you probably can't. Have you ever taken apart a lens or seen their insides? – scottbb Nov 2 '17 at 20:47
  • Is the ribbon soldered, or does it have a connector? Usually you just have to lift a lip on the base, and it releases the cable. – dgatwood Nov 2 '17 at 20:58
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    If a repair shop said they couldn't and wouldn't even offer a price, then it's beyond the help of mere mortals. You could ask Sigma for a quote to repair, but I suspect they'd suggest replacement instead. One point to remember : never try and repair a new lens yourself - you may be voiding any warranty or standard cover you have on it by trying. – StephenG Nov 3 '17 at 5:06
  • If you can't even focus manually, it's probably done and would cost more that repair than it's worth. Insurance? – Gmck Nov 3 '17 at 16:45
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    I have had good experience with the Sigma service - similar problem, albeit with an older lens: focus stuck after dropping it. Total repair cost was just 80 Euros. – Chris Mar 26 '18 at 10:53
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In the end, the lens was far too damaged for them to even consider repairing it. Unfortunately, even the specialist repair place gave me absolutely no information as to what the issues were exactly so I can't provide more information. No further DIY was attempted.

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It is extremely unlikely you'll be able to fix the lens. As stated by others:

  • "if you have to ask if you can fix, you probably can't." (scottbb)

  • "If a repair shop said they couldn't and wouldn't even offer a price, then it's beyond the help of mere mortals." (StephenG)

Modern lenses contain many mechanical and electronic parts, such as AF/IS motors, zoom mechanisms, multiple ribbons, and dozens of elements, that are intricately pieced together. The repair shop may refuse to repair a lens that could in principle be fixed, but which would cost more in labor and parts than simple replacement. Also, if non-serviceable, non-replaceable components, such as ribbons that have been soldered in place, have been damaged, the lens would be considered unrepairable.

Your options:

  • Sell the lens as-is for parts.

  • Use it to repair a basically working lens, such as one with a damaged front element.

  • Disassemble the lens as a learning exercise and for DIY-project parts.

  • Take more care to not drop camera equipment in the future.

See Michael Clark's response to another lens repair question.

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