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A try at the longest realistic Nikon lens for the camera is the 200-500 f/5.6. With your APS-C sensor, that provides about an 800 mm effective focal length. To get the same field of view as the P1000 you would need to crop to about 1/4 of the frame in each direction. That reduces your pixel count to about 1.5M, which sounds terrible but is not so bad ...


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None of them. There is no commercially available lens for the Nikon D3400 that has a 125X zoom ratio. The entire point of an interchangeable lens camera is to allow one to use a lens that is optimized for one's intended purpose instead of a lens that is mediocre or worse for a lot of different purposes. Even using two relatively cheap kit lenses, such as ...


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While there would be solutions below the price of a P1000 to reach the pure focal length of 3000mm equivalent (eg starting with an off brand 500mm prime and stacking two teleconverters), such would be slow, unstabilized, manual focus, big, and requiring substantial post processing of the results. Handholding an unstabilized 1200mm equivalent lens is ...


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Simple answer: there isn't one. The longest lenses made for (relatively) large sensor cameras like your D3400 have a focal length of around 1000mm, only a third of the P1000's max length of 3000mm. Also: Those very long lenses are prime lenses: no zoom. Those lenses are really quite large. Those lenses, if available at all, cost around $100,000. If you ...


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Tables an charts base the circle of confusion, the Case A 50mm lens focused @ 2 feet aperture f/8 circle of confusion 1/1000 of focal length = 0.05mm. Span of D of F = 0.39 feet. Case B 100mm lens focused @ 4 feet aperture f/8 circle of confusion same 0.05. Span of D of F same 0.39 feet = 4.7 inches Case C 100mm lens focused 4 feet criteria for D of F on1/...


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Here is the standard Depth of Field formula for reference: DOF = 2 u2 N C / f2 N = aperture F-number C = circle of confusion u = distance to subject f = focal length When aperture and subject size within the frame are constant, DOF will not change because changes to focal length (f) and distance (u) will be proportional to each other and ...


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Maybe it's just that when you look in the view finder the bird (and little surrounding) is all you see, therefore the bird looks big. When you print the image/look at a phone or computer screen you see the bird, the little surrounding, the phone/screen, possibly your hands and the surrounding around you. To get the same view you would have to put the ...


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The view finder of cameras doesn't always cover the whole picture (around 85% on entry-level cameras, 95% on yours) but I don't think this is the problem. You are likely too focused on the bird and see it/remember it bigger than it really is. Try shooting a distant and fixed object with a fixed camera (tripod, or set on a table). Aim at subject, make a ...


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The issue is the aspect ratio – the relationship between the width and height. Phone cameras will take images with approximately the same aspect ratio as a modern TV, 16:9. A dedicated camera, on the other hand, will take images at 3:2. (The main exception is Micro Four Thirds, which uses a 4:3 aspect ratio, like the old 'square' TVs from 20 years ago.) ...


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