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Y' in (Y',Cb,Cr) is called the Luma component, and on its own it represents a reasonable black and white image. But Y' is not an accurate representation of the actual Luminance; for blue and red objects its value is way too low. This is described as the Constant Luminance Error. For a better result the order of some operations must be changed; the wrong ...


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A simple answer is: by definition! That's how it's constructed. In order for Y to be like this, i.e. to be the intensity, they came up with 'magic numbers' after some experiments on live humans.


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Likely someone above my pay grade can explain it better – but here goes: When I went to school more than half a century ago – Color TV broadcast signals only needed to broadcast signal intelligence for two colors i.e. green and blue. The red value is gleaned by adding the green and blue and subtracting this value from the total. On an oscilloscope, the ...


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I would do one of them manually in Photoshop (Image -> Mode -> RGB Color), then record an Action of the process https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/using/creating-actions.html. Then play the action back on the remaining images. If you need other steps, such as assigning a new color profile, resizing, etc., just record those as part of the action too.


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Short answer, no. But here's some suggestions (in order from easiest to hardest) that might be useful to meet your end-goal of learning about the colour space. The eyedroppers link mentioned by @Stan has many apps that provide variously RGB, CMYK, HSV/HSB, HSL and conversions to various standard representations of those (e.g. for HTML). While that doesn't ...


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