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18

The Exif:ApertureValue is stored as an APEX value as mandated by various EXIF standards. The APEX system is a way to calculate exposure and works using base-2 logarithms. The use of base-2 means a rise of one in the value equates to a doubling, which we know as 1 stop; which makes it pretty handy for photographers if they're good with logarithms (which we ...


5

It is not currently possible to either save multiple .XMP files per image nor to save multiple versions of settings in a single .XMP file. Here are a couple workarounds: Instead of creating a virtual copy, make one set of adjustments and save a snapshot in the Develop module, then go on and make the other set of adjustments. This is kind of clunky, but ...


4

Because databases or sidecar files could get separated, I prefer to put the info right in the JPEGs, which is easily done with exiftool. I use XMP because it's the most flexible and modern. As a bonus, this is what the fast and versatile image viewer/catalogger geeqie uses, so it's easy to view and edit tags, titles, and descriptions that way.


4

So after a little digging and with the help of Murat's hint I found the following field in some pictures. This basically is the way that Adobe Lightroom stores the information and it could be used as a defacto standard in your project. We already went for a similar solution with our own field name and no use of rdf, but just to close this question here is ...


4

There's https://dtstyle.net It's a repository of *.dtstyle files, not XMP files... those are generally used for file-specific information. Styles can be managed in the "Styles" panel on the right-hand side in lighttable mode.


4

The interface for a lot of programs with regards to keywords is to show them as a comma separated string. But the important thing to remember is that they are not stored as such. They are stored as individual, separate items, as in @Romeo Ninov XMP example. To do this in exiftool, you command would be exiftool -Subject=Tulips -Subject=Flower FILE Note ...


3

If you are storing standard metadata fields such as camera information, it would probably be easiest to stick to the well defined field names and types of EXIF. It may mean better compatibility with other applications that may not have as good support for XMP. Your other option is to simply use both as they can co-exist in the same file.


3

feels wrong to clog up my folders with thousands of xmp files that I'll probably never use You say "Lightroom CC," by which I assume you also have Photoshop. Every time you say "Edit in Photoshop," you use the XMP data. Photoshop loads it when it loads the photo, and then saves it back out when you save the edited photo. When you tell Lightroom to "Edit ...


3

You are right: there isn't one. I suggest using this custom schema: http://analogexif.sourceforge.net/help/analogexif-xmp.php, because at least you will be consistent with what someone is doing (and enough people doing that is the genesis of many standards). Specifically, the relevant tags are: ScannerMaker (Xmp.AnalogExif.ScannerMaker) String value....


3

Well you can find a list of XMP field names used by common photo software on this page. For example, digiKam uses the TagsList field name in XMP metadata to store its tag hierarchy. So when I mark an image with the "Brighton" sub-tag which is nested under the "East-Sussex" sub-tag, nested under the "UK" sub-tag, nested under the "located" top-level tag, and ...


3

They're all proprietary. Each application uses their own algorithms to convert the raw data. To the best of my knowledge none of the adjustments made with one application will translate identically in another application unless both applications use the same raw conversion engine "under the hood" (e.g. Adobe Lightroom and Adobe Photoshop both use Adobe ...


3

Sure, if your picture is exported in JPEG, it's safe to do whatever you want on the RAW source. XMP files are just an archived history of the processing stages on the RAW file (settings and parameters used), it has nothing to do with the exported JPEG. However, I would not recommend to delete the XMP files. First, it's just a few more kilobytes (like a ...


2

Lightroom stores metadata in the XMP format and supports EXIF, IPTC (IIM), and TIFF metadata definitions (it converts and stores those as XMP as well). Where the information is stored depends on the format of the image the metadata describes. If the the original format supports XMP, it is embedded in the file. If not (proprietary RAW formats are an example), ...


2

Andres, there is a second, potentially better, method that i have found. on your original file, save snapshot "original" on your virtual copy, save snapshot "virtual copy" "save metadata to file" on your original file the xmp will contain 2 snapshots. one of your original, one for your virtual copy. open up the linked xmp file in a text editor and you ...


2

The only way possible that I know of is to do the following workaround:- create a smart collection using "copy name" - "is not empty" this will create a smart collection of all your virtual copies export using "file format" "original" choose a folder for your exported files, or use "same folder as original image". you may want to put the virtual copies in ...


2

Sounds to me that it is more likely to have been a failure saving the file over the network. Network backups are nice for archival storage, but horrible for live work due to the extremely slow load times for relatively large files. The process I generally use is to initially transfer my files to my high speed scratch SSD array (striped). I then ...


2

exiv2 seems to really prefer keeping the basenames of image files and sidecar/metadata files matched. You could automate (script) the creation/deletion of copying/renaming the metadata files like you have. However, for what you want to do, I would strongly suggest using exiftool. It follows the unix stream paradigm much more closely. You can do what you ...


2

So, are there any downsides to activating this option? Some people apparently experience minor performance impact when the data is written to the disk. I see no difference on an SSD. Obviously, you will have your folders littered with XMP files with Adobe specific data and questionable usefulness outside of LR/ACR.


2

After a few days of research, I've concluded that at the time of writing there is no holy grail. But as for futureproofing I'd go the following route: keep the original RAW file work with Adobe products for the adjustments (either inside Lightroom or with sidecar xmp files produced by adobe camera RAW) This probably is as futureproof and cross-platform as ...


2

The XMP files created by Lightroom seems to follow the MWG description (website currently down), as it contains this link to describe its content : xmlns:mwg-rs="http://www.metadataworkinggroup.com/schemas/regions/" I took a random XMP file from one of my picture containing a recognized person : the part mwg-rs:Region is structured as follows : <mwg-...


1

This is a partial answer. According to this list Exif.Photo.ApertureValue is "The lens aperture. The unit is the APEX value." Which is confirmed by Wikipedia article on APEX. No idea how to make the conversion though.


1

If you're using darktable, then select the image in lighttable mode and push 'duplicate'. The button can be found under the 'selected images' control group. Relevant User Manual Page


1

Why do you want to store them in sidecars specifically? If Adobe Lightroom is an option for you, this software is purpose-built for this sort of scenario. You can create multiple "virtual copies" of the same image in the Lightroom library, and develop them in different ways. The settings are not stored in multiple sidecar files, but it's unclear what ...


1

Several ifs involved here. If you can see an image to edit I would assume that the originals were saved with smart previews enabled. If so, any edits to the preview will be applied to the original when the xmp's which are created are 'reunited' with the originals. According to Adobe: "Note: Smart Previews are stored in the [Catalog Name] Smart Previews....


1

They are different formats. XMP is an XML based format that is more self-descriptive where as EXIF requires knowing the format of the file to know what value is at each offset. EXIF is more limited in what it can store (atleast that can be universally recognized) but also is smaller since it doesn't need descriptors of the fields to be included in the file....


1

You can suggest to your client to use a Digital Asset Management to manage his image bank. The most modern DAM solutions can automatically save tag hierarchy to XMP. EXIF is mainly used for storing technical camera and image shooting info. Another standard is IPTC but it is obsoleted and has significant limitations to length of the fields. Hiearchical ...


1

Have you try this way: cat Photo1.xml | exiv2 -i - thumb_Photo1.jpg This command will send the content of Photo1.xml to STDOUT and the next command will use it as STDIN and insert it in to thumb_Photo1.jpg file. P.S. In the man page of exiv2 I see this example: exiv2 -e{tgt}- filename|xmllint .... | exiv2 -i{tgt}- filename


1

At your step 5., when you export a RAW file from LR to PS (or when you open a RAW file with PS, make some editing and then save it in TIFF format and import it back to LR), a TIFF get created. However, this TIFF has no sidecar file attached, so you won't find any. So back in LR with a TIFF file, you expect the changes you made to be saved in a XMP file... ...


1

I turned on the option "Include Develop settings in metadata inside JPEG" in Lightroom. What this option basically does is saving the recipe to reproduce all the Adjustments you made within the JPG File in an XML-Format, instead of creating a so-called sidecar file. Is there any program that I can invoke as an external editor, that can read the original ...


1

I believe your CSV file will need a couple alterations. First, I don't think Exiftool will read a tab delimited csv. The docs seem to indicate comma separated only. You could import into Excel or OpenOffice with the tab delimiter set and export a new CSV which should be readable to Exiftool. Second, the first line needs to needs to have column headers ...


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