16

The reason you were triggering the other flashes is that the other photographer is a rookie. She was probably using the flashes as optical slaves... bad decision. Even if she was using a radio signal she could easily set up a different radio frequency. It is a rookie mistake leaving the flashes as the frequency 1. Because most likely other nonprofessional ...


3

Many built-in flashes have no mode in which there is no preflash. This means that in S1, your external flash will be triggered then, and may fire too soon to be included in the exposure at all. So S2 is needed to even work. You're right that the flash won't be factored into the metering in this case. You'll have to factor it in yourself, using manual ...


3

Your question is poorly worded but I assume you are asking if you can use the Godox X1T wireless trigger with your Godox V860 without attaching an external receiver. The answer is no. The Godox v860 does not have a built-in 2.4GHz receiver needed to communicate with the Godox X1T transmitter. To use it with the X1T, you need an XTR16S receiver attached to ...


3

You can also switch to Godox's system. You would need the Xpro-C for control from the camera, X1R-C receivers for your flashes, and of course some extra lights. You can get cheap flash units from Godox or Yongnou to work with these receivers, or even add some reasonably cheap monolights to complete your setup (these monolights have a built in trigger ...


3

None of Canon's cameras have built-in radio transmitters. The built-in wireless features are all dependent upon either: a pop-up optical flash a hot shoe mounted optical flash or controller a hot shoe mounted radio transmitter (including a hot shoe mounted flash that contains a radio transmitter, such as your YN600EX-RT) Both optical and radio are ...


2

There are two ways a camera or transmitter can communicate with a flash: radio and visible light / infrared in an encoded form (different from a dumb optical slave). It looks like Canon 77D uses encoded visible light. Your cheap Yongnuo YN600EX-RT II supports at least radio (that's what the RT means). But does it support encoded visible light? Only the ...


2

The YN-560-TX, as a dedicated radio transmitter requires a radio receiver to trigger a remote flash. The SB-900 does not have one built-in, so you need to add one onto the foot of the flash. You can use the RF-602, RF-603, RF-603 II, or RF-605. But all you will be able to do is fire the flash remotely. The YN-560-TX and an RF-60x cannot communicate TTL, HSS ...


2

Depends on your definition of "works." The Neewer TT560/Godox TT560/Amazon Basics flash is a single-pin manual only flash. It cannot do TTL, HSS, or talk to your camera's flash menus. All you can tell this flash to do via the single pin on its foot is tell it when to fire. And that should work on an Olympus camera hotshoe or with radio triggers. But that'...


2

The YN968EX-RT uses the Canon RT radio protocol. The Yongnuo YN968EX-RT is not compatible with the YN622C protocol. It's also not compatible with the different YN560/RF603/RF605 protocol used by Yongnuo for manual only flashes. Your confusion about the YN968EX-RT compatibility with the YN622C-TX probably stems from the fact that the Nikon version of the ...


2

Yes, your camera can control your flash using optical communication. See page 217 and following of the Camera manual. You of course have to set the flash to "optical slave" mode ("lightning" icon) and make sure it is on the same channel as the camera. Tip: in the camera flash settings, you can set the lighting ratio between the camera and the external flash,...


2

You need the Yongnuo YN-E3-RT (or other RT-compatible transmitter) to use the 600EX-RT as an off-camera radio receiver, since none of the Canon bodies have a radio transmitter for flash built-in. However. The 77D's pop-up flash can also be a transmitter in Canon's "smart" optical system. And the YN-600EX-RT II can be a receiver in that system as well (all ...


1

What am I missing? That it's a timing issue. The S1/S2 modes are "dumb"; there's no communication between the camera and the flash going on. A simple sensor on the flash detects when a flash burst has gone off, and then fires the flash. As you noted, S1 fires on the first burst sensed; S2 on the second burst sensed. With flash, the camera cannot meter how ...


1

Are you in live view mode? Sometimes live view in cameras refuses to fire the shutter or if an external flash or adapter is attached. Have you tried switching the lens to manual focus? Have you installed the latest firmware? Is your self timer on? Does your hotshoe fire your external flash without issue if it's directly connected? If all that ...


1

The Yongnuo YN560-TX II has a radio transmitter made to communicate with Yongnuo manual flashes with built in radio receivers that use the YN560/RF605/RF603 protocol. Your SB900 has an optical receiver for Nikon's CLS/AWL wireless flash protocol. Although the Yongnuo YN560/RF605/RF603 manual protocol and the YN622 TTL protocols are mostly incompatible, ...


1

If someone is already in the Canon RT system (or one of its clones), then Yongnuo triggers would be a good option. A YN-E3-RT II (or the older original version) will communicate directly with any Canon RT flash without a need for an additional receiver. Yongnuo triggers and Yongnuo flashes are two different animals in terms of reliability. I've never had ...


1

Some alternative options to consider: One: Potentially the most cost effective option to running a four group setup like this is: Don't. Use your current three groups, and a fixed level light on a dumb-trigger. Example: Group-1: key-light Group-2: fill-light Group-3: hair-light Fixed Light: background-lights Set up your background exposure to be ...


1

It works reasonably well -- much better inside because the light can bounce around to reach the flashes. Range really depends on whether flashes have line-of-sight to the ST-E2. I'd say 30-40 feet from memory. I have not used it much outside. Wireless is super convenient outside if you have it. In its absence, and over longer distances, I much prefer a long ...


1

The only way I've been able to get 'Multi (Stroboscopic) Flash' to work wirelessly via a YN622-TX is to set the multi settings via the in-camera flash menu of my Canon camera with the YN622C-TX set to 'Manual' for the group(s) I'm using in 'Multi' mode. The flash should be set to '622 Remote - Slave'. The initial settings on the flash should be the "neutral"...


1

Why don't you want to bounce the flash against the ceiling? Because the ceiling is dark, too high or there is no ceiling? In such a situation, I think MagBounce or an umbrella is your best option, although it's not an exact replica, as the light is not coming from above. I have considered purchasing such a MagBounce modifier. A flash stand that is as high ...


1

Which aspect are you trying to reproduce? The light from above? You can bounce light off anything, so any large white (or silver, or whatever color you prefer) thing can be held off camera and have the flash pointed at it. You can hold a large white card or similar reflector above the camera and use it to bounce the flash onto the scene. Probably awkward to ...


1

As of January 2019, Olympus themselves now produce OEM flash gear with built-in radio triggering: FL-700WR speedlight FC-WR transmitter FR-WR receiver The system allows for TTL, HSS, 2nd curtain, and three groups. The receiver has a sync port for studio strobes as well as a hotshoe for speedlights, and adds a recycle beep. See: https://www.olympus-...


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