46

Because there is a lot happening in a short timeframe (movement phases of a fast animal or athlete), and you want to photograph it all and/or the exact timing of the relevant event cannot be predicted, so covering as many possible times where that event could happen (and discarding the rest later) is necessary and/or redundant pictures are needed ...


37

Strictly speaking, one does not need high FPS burst modes for sports or wildlife, but rather they are useful tools that open up more options. I've shot sports in the last few years with a Canon 7D, typically using 5-8 frame bursts (at I think 8fps) at a time, and I've also used a medium format manual focus camera. Both methods have produced great images, ...


23

If you're going to take courses, I'd suggest you take them in zoology, wildlife preservation and management, or related fields about wildlife. While learning to master your camera and getting the correct lenses and support gear and learning the proper techniques for the type of wildlife you want to shoot is going to be important, the one skill you absolutely ...


21

Well, in order to get good results, you'll have to make the plunge into non-auto settings. I'd recommend Manual mode. The problem you're running into here is that you are pointing your camera at a bird in the sky, which is bright. Camera meters are set up to try and make every exposure a uniform grey in terms of brightness. So if you point your camera at ...


17

The only ethical ways to get closer is to either use a lens with a longer focal length ("more reach"), or to view them in captivity, such as in a zoo. Trying to get closer to wildlife will only stress them (which you have observed their reaction — to run away). Without stalking the deer, you can use the approach favored by hunters: be in places they are ...


15

In addition to all the correct answers about how fast action occurs, I'd like to point out two fundamental biological reasons for why you need burst: 100ms. This is the fastest we can react to a stimulus. Olympic sprinters start to contract their muscles 100ms after the starter's gun goes off. Any event which occurs faster than this cannot be captured by ...


12

You don't become a surgeon without first becoming a doctor. Similarly wildlife photography is a specialization of our hobby that you get into later. I would recommend that you first buy a cheap beginner camera and lens and learn basic photography, click pictures of birds, pets and what not. If you find that photography is to your liking then invest in a ...


12

Sea turtles normally hatch at night. So I'd plan to visit during a full moon, if you can. That way you will have some natural light to work with. I'd recommend using the slowest shutter speed you can that still gives you a blur free shot, so use Shutter Priority (TV on Canons). Newborn turtles generally move in bursts, so focus your shooting on the ones ...


11

With any lens of greater than 300mm focal length on a full frame camera you're probably not going to get results you're happy with shooting handheld. On your 1.6X APS-C camera, the same angles of view are provided by any lens 188mm or longer. It is true that lenses such as the Sigma and Tamron 150-600mm telephoto zooms are weakest at their longest focal ...


10

Not necessarily. The APS-C sensor merely crops the image that would have been captured on a full frame sensor, so you end up with what you'd get if you used a full frame and cropped in post (see: Does my crop sensor camera actually turn my lenses into a longer focal length? and Is crop-factor a bad thing?) But given a full-frame and a crop sensor of the ...


10

Crop sensors are indeed used for wildlife to get more reach without sacrificing megapixels. And, you can get closer images without spending as much money. Sure, you could crop, but then your printing dimensions will be reduced. For display on the web, at 72dpi or so, it wouldn't matter if you cropped. All that said, remember that to get the same image as a ...


8

Hmm... To be honest, I'd have gone for something longer. For European wildlife, I use a Nikon 80-400 VR zoom lens, and mostly towards the long end. A wider aperture will give you a brighter viewfinder image - but I suspect you'll probably end up shooting at somewhere around f8 to get an adequate depth of field; That's what I usually end up doing if I want to ...


7

As someone who occasionally indulges in bird photography, shoots micro four-thirds, and has adapted manual lenses to her Canon dSLRs, I'd say don't do it. The lens will be disproportionately big and heavy compared to your G5, and the lack of autofocus (and EXIF, and aperture control from the body unless the lens has an aperture ring) will probably be more ...


7

I'd say that if you have to ask which lens would be most suitable, you're probably going to want the range of the Sigma 50-500mm. The 70-200mm f/2.8 is the best of the lenses you listed. The 70-300mm D has gone through a couple updates over the years, so compared to the other 2, it's a bit dated. But because you're not exactly sure of what you'll be seeing, ...


7

Easiest fix Only shoot the bird when the sun is at your back, not behind the bird. Given how redtails circle where I am, I sometimes just wait as I draw a bead and follow them around the circle, to where the light is falling on them nicely. However. This will be rarer than backlit opportunities, because a hunting hawk doesn't like to fly into the light ...


7

Short version : you need more shutter speed. Crank up ISO, use widest aperture and trade both for shutter speed. they still either naturally wander off or hop and run away whenever I get within about 20 feet Well I'd consider 20 feet good enough. Actually pretty good. And if you spook them, even a young deer is a pretty big animal if it decides to run ...


7

Capturing fast motion is hard. It requires persistence, benefits from practice, and focus on the few successes not the many failures. Even experienced photographers produce more poor pictures than good, and only a handful of great pictures. Persistence means managing expectations of always getting a keeper. Sometimes everyone gets skunked. To get good ...


6

It depends on how you define "work". And it depends on the lens with which you are working. If it means everything will work the way it does as you are now shooting with only the EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 lens the answer is no. Autofocus: Because your T3 limits your auto focus system to lenses with maximum apertures of f/5.6 or wider, even a 1.4x teleconverter ...


6

Sometimes the circumstance under which you are shooting trumps distinctions between the optical quality of one lens over another, even when there is significant difference in the optical quality of the lenses in question. This is one of those times. When shooting subject matter such as bears in the wilds of Alaska, focal length is the key consideration. ...


6

There can definitely be some benefit to be gained by using a crop sensor camera when longer focal length is desireable. It is one of the reasons compact "superzoom" cameras can give fields of view equivalent to 1000mm+ focal lengths on a full frame camera with a much smaller lens than would be required to get that same FoV using a full frame sensor camera. ...


6

I think the simple answer is when whatever alternative techniques you use do not yield sharp results. It is worthwhile to take a comparison shot with all parts of the tripod locked down, mirror up (if your camera supports it), no hands release (if you can), and with the tripod out of the wind or other sources of vibration. You appear to have done that. I ...


6

Take the following with a baker's pinch (aka handful) of salt. The difference between F2.8 and F4 is only one stop. Whether that's worth an extra £1500 is a personal decision that only you can decide. Personally, I think the 70-2004G VR would be fine, and I'd go for another body or lens suitable for people, landscape, and other touristy pictures. For dawn/...


6

Focal length does not much depend on the bird or the camera, but instead depends on the distance to the bird. Is distance 3 meters or 30 meters? The camera you own is likely very fine. Use it to learn if your use actually needs any other feature.


5

I've been a professional long-lens bird/nature shooter since the 80's. I used to use very big and pricey dedicated video cameras/lenses, but now have found the wonderful micro-4/3 world and love it. I've gotten some amazing shots, both video and stills, by adapting older long telephoto lenses to my Panasonic G6 and GH3, as well as my Olympus E-PL5 and E-M5 ...


5

Movement, scent, noise and shape are more likely to effect an animal's behaviour than the pattern of the camouflage used on a lens. However the pattern may help in that it breaks up the shape of the outline of the lens, which is alien to the animal's habitat and will most likely be seen a trap. As many animals are colour blind, the colour may not effect them,...


5

Clearly you didn't get to this point in your work by accident, your overall technique sounds fairly decent, so I'll offer a few suggestions or insights that didn't seem immediately obvious to me as I was working out my own long lens technique. Caveat: I don't do wildlife, but I do shoot multi row gigapixel panoramas with long lenses (300mm+) at night, in ...


5

None of them. Here are the reasons why: Teleconverters are designed to be used with telephoto lenses. Most makers of teleconverters state that they are intended with lenses of 70mm focal length or longer. But many teleconverters are designed to ideally work with lenses 135mm or longer. Even if they will physically fit on wider angle lenses, and often they ...


5

He describes his Macro process on his blog. https://pbertner.wordpress.com/how-i-shoot-macro/ While you selected a few that have that effect, many don't. I don't think its anything more than composing the piece, being patient, and waiting for the specimen to be in the right contrast area with the right lighting. He does mention occasionally using flashes ...


5

The photographer has arranged a shallow depth of focus, and has chosen a plain background. And, according to his blog, has selected from a very large number of less successful attempts!


5

I'm completely at sea with magnification, crop, zoom and telephoto Lenses are described in terms of focal length, and all you really need to know about focal length is that shorter focal lengths give a wide angle view, and longer focal lengths give a very narrow view. That is, a wide angle lens (again, short focal length, like 10mm or 20mm) packs most of ...


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