46

Because there is a lot happening in a short timeframe (movement phases of a fast animal or athlete), and you want to photograph it all and/or the exact timing of the relevant event cannot be predicted, so covering as many possible times where that event could happen (and discarding the rest later) is necessary and/or redundant pictures are needed ...


37

Strictly speaking, one does not need high FPS burst modes for sports or wildlife, but rather they are useful tools that open up more options. I've shot sports in the last few years with a Canon 7D, typically using 5-8 frame bursts (at I think 8fps) at a time, and I've also used a medium format manual focus camera. Both methods have produced great images, ...


32

There are several related questions here. Are mirror lenses good at all (opinion) Are mirror lenses good for wldlife shots in daylight. Are cheap mirror lenses value for money. Relevant: I own a Minolta 500mm AF f8 "Reflex" lens- the only model of AF "mirror" lens ever made AFAIK and one of the better quality ones around. I think that as long as you ...


23

If you're going to take courses, I'd suggest you take them in zoology, wildlife preservation and management, or related fields about wildlife. While learning to master your camera and getting the correct lenses and support gear and learning the proper techniques for the type of wildlife you want to shoot is going to be important, the one skill you absolutely ...


20

Well, in order to get good results, you'll have to make the plunge into non-auto settings. I'd recommend Manual mode. The problem you're running into here is that you are pointing your camera at a bird in the sky, which is bright. Camera meters are set up to try and make every exposure a uniform grey in terms of brightness. So if you point your camera at ...


17

There are several custom function options available to the 7D which can be configured to assist with tracking moving objects: C.FnIII -1 AI Servo Tracking Sensitivity You want this set to "Slow" - this will stop the AF system trying to refocus on anything that briefly passes between you and the subject you are tracking - handy with birds where branches etc ...


17

The only ethical ways to get closer is to either use a lens with a longer focal length ("more reach"), or to view them in captivity, such as in a zoo. Trying to get closer to wildlife will only stress them (which you have observed their reaction — to run away). Without stalking the deer, you can use the approach favored by hunters: be in places they are ...


15

From my experience with my 7D and now a 5D (mkIII), I'd say for wildlife stuff, the 7D would be your preferred choice, for four reasons:- APS-C 1.6x crop sensor. This will extend the reach of any and all lenses you put on your camera. A 200mm becomes a 320, a 400mm becomes a 640, etc. Using teleconverters will cost you light, and therefore require slower ...


15

In addition to all the correct answers about how fast action occurs, I'd like to point out two fundamental biological reasons for why you need burst: 100ms. This is the fastest we can react to a stimulus. Olympic sprinters start to contract their muscles 100ms after the starter's gun goes off. Any event which occurs faster than this cannot be captured by ...


12

You don't become a surgeon without first becoming a doctor. Similarly wildlife photography is a specialization of our hobby that you get into later. I would recommend that you first buy a cheap beginner camera and lens and learn basic photography, click pictures of birds, pets and what not. If you find that photography is to your liking then invest in a ...


12

Sea turtles normally hatch at night. So I'd plan to visit during a full moon, if you can. That way you will have some natural light to work with. I'd recommend using the slowest shutter speed you can that still gives you a blur free shot, so use Shutter Priority (TV on Canons). Newborn turtles generally move in bursts, so focus your shooting on the ones ...


11

The mm of a lens is the focal length. To take close-up shots of things far away, you need a "long" focal length, which means high mm. An entry or mid-level Canon camera has an "APS-C" sized sensor. The sensor size is really what determines what the meaning of the focal length is — focal length and sensor size together give you angle of view. (See my visual ...


10

With any lens of greater than 300mm focal length on a full frame camera you're probably not going to get results you're happy with shooting handheld. On your 1.6X APS-C camera, the same angles of view are provided by any lens 188mm or longer. It is true that lenses such as the Sigma and Tamron 150-600mm telephoto zooms are weakest at their longest focal ...


9

This addresses only my opinion on one less-central aspect of the question: I agree that the more extreme forms of what you describe are unethical or immoral. As well as avoiding mistreatment of the target animal, I would personally never use live-bait for anything, but that's a personal choice and many would be happy to do so. But I don't see too much ...


9

This is going to depend very much on what camera body you are using. Canon cameras do not focus past f/5.6 unless you are using a 1-series body (or are willing to do some warranty-voiding pin taping to force f/8 AF on unsupported bodies...which is usually a moot exercise anyway). Slapping a 2x TC onto a 70-200 f/4 is going to give you an f/8 aperture, and ...


9

The 70-200 F2.8L IS II works fine with a 2.0x teleconverter. That's my standard birding and critter lens these days. It's sharper than a 300F4+1.4x (my previous go to lens), and MUCH sharper than a canon 100-400 @ 400mm (my initial birding len). All are acceptable, the 70-200+2.0x is incredibly sharp and I'm really impressed with that lens combo. I use that ...


9

Not necessarily. The APS-C sensor merely crops the image that would have been captured on a full frame sensor, so you end up with what you'd get if you used a full frame and cropped in post (see: Does my crop sensor camera actually turn my lenses into a longer focal length? and Is crop-factor a bad thing?) But given a full-frame and a crop sensor of the ...


9

Crop sensors are indeed used for wildlife to get more reach without sacrificing megapixels. And, you can get closer images without spending as much money. Sure, you could crop, but then your printing dimensions will be reduced. For display on the web, at 72dpi or so, it wouldn't matter if you cropped. All that said, remember that to get the same image as a ...


8

I own that lens. It is, indeed, a solid performer at that range for the money it commands. You'll find a lot of grey area when evaluating whether it's the right next lens for you, but I'd certainly encourage you to stay away from the 75-300; it's just not a good performer when stacked up against low/mid-range lenses like the 55-250 or 70-300. You may find ...


8

Hmm... To be honest, I'd have gone for something longer. For European wildlife, I use a Nikon 80-400 VR zoom lens, and mostly towards the long end. A wider aperture will give you a brighter viewfinder image - but I suspect you'll probably end up shooting at somewhere around f8 to get an adequate depth of field; That's what I usually end up doing if I want to ...


7

It is great that you know what you want to shoot and have a respectable budget. The issue with what you are asking is that you will not be able to satisfy all those requirements at any price. The most critical is that bird photography takes long lenses which are they also need to be bright when you want to shoot wildlife in low-light. Honestly, it's hard to ...


7

That's a complicated want list with things that are fundamentally in conflict. Here are what I think are the key thigns you're asking for: Canon Body landscapes and people (wide angle zoom) flowers and occasional macro-style shots birds and critters (big, powerful telephoto) Body $2000, lens $2000 (max, $1500 preferred). So, $3500 total. Lightweight. ...


7

I'd say that if you have to ask which lens would be most suitable, you're probably going to want the range of the Sigma 50-500mm. The 70-200mm f/2.8 is the best of the lenses you listed. The 70-300mm D has gone through a couple updates over the years, so compared to the other 2, it's a bit dated. But because you're not exactly sure of what you'll be seeing, ...


7

Easiest fix Only shoot the bird when the sun is at your back, not behind the bird. Given how redtails circle where I am, I sometimes just wait as I draw a bead and follow them around the circle, to where the light is falling on them nicely. However. This will be rarer than backlit opportunities, because a hunting hawk doesn't like to fly into the light ...


7

Short version : you need more shutter speed. Crank up ISO, use widest aperture and trade both for shutter speed. they still either naturally wander off or hop and run away whenever I get within about 20 feet Well I'd consider 20 feet good enough. Actually pretty good. And if you spook them, even a young deer is a pretty big animal if it decides to run ...


6

There is no one lens that can do everything you want because wildlife and landscape require almost the exact opposite lens properties. I have the 18-135 and I love it as a travel lens - but it's not a good wildlife lens. For wildlife you want a long focal length and fast accurate auto-focus, long lenses tend to be big and heavy so they aren't very easy-to-...


6

Sometimes you get lucky, but in general, wildlife photography takes time. I expect your foxes are also active during part of the day, which would make things much easier. Spend the time to learn their habits, and if possible, for them to get used to you. Even so, you're still probably going to see foxes at a distance and for short periods at a time. This ...


6

As someone who occasionally indulges in bird photography, shoots micro four-thirds, and has adapted manual lenses to her Canon dSLRs, I'd say don't do it. The lens will be disproportionately big and heavy compared to your G5, and the lack of autofocus (and EXIF, and aperture control from the body unless the lens has an aperture ring) will probably be more ...


6

It depends on how you define "work". And it depends on the lens with which you are working. If it means everything will work the way it does as you are now shooting with only the EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 lens the answer is no. Autofocus: Because your T3 limits your auto focus system to lenses with maximum apertures of f/5.6 or wider, even a 1.4x teleconverter ...


6

Sometimes the circumstance under which you are shooting trumps distinctions between the optical quality of one lens over another, even when there is significant difference in the optical quality of the lenses in question. This is one of those times. When shooting subject matter such as bears in the wilds of Alaska, focal length is the key consideration. ...


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