10

Gamut and color count are not really the same thing, although a low bit depth will start to affect gamut to a degree (i.e. a 6-bit flat panel will never be wide gamut, simply because its sampling of the color space is too sparse.) Gamut describes the range of colors, from the total Lab* space, that a monitor is capable of representing. Many monitors are ...


8

Yes - you need to calibrate your monitor. One option, which is what I did, is to buy a relatively cheap colorimeter, at the time the Huey Pro was generally available. I used it as a travel colorimeter. Later, when I wasn't traveling as much, I bought a more expensive colorimeter (Lacie Blue-Eye Pro) for my home IPS monitor. I found that the cheaper ...


7

First, one need not spend $10,000 on a printer to get a wide gamut. To be specific, to PRINT wide gamut, you don't need to spend a lot of money. There is often an implicit association between managing color and printing wide gamut, however the two are actually separate activities. These days, the actual process of managing color is automated by ICM, which ...


6

I would say that a wide-gamut display is NOT really necessary if you only intend to publish to the web. As you know, sRGB is pretty much the lowest common denominator for presentation on the web. Unless you expect the majority of your viewers to be using color-managed web browsers capable of properly rendering images tagged with AdobeRGB, there aren't really ...


5

Well, if you want to be able to work in a gamut, you do need to be able to display it, but it doesn't cost $2000 to get a monitor with AdobeRGB support. I use an HP LP2475w as my main monitor and it is able to support AdobeRGB fine and was only $650 when I got it several years ago. You also need a color calibration unit, of which there are many options, ...


4

The real key is going to be that you'll want true 8 bit color resolution rather than the 6 bits that most TN panels get. Off angle color changes is also a key issue when looking at choosing a good screen for any color sensitive work. Having a wider color gamut is helpful, but if I had to choose between a more limited color gamut on a S-IPS panel with good ...


3

16.7 millions colors is one way of describing a 24-bit monitor. It is capable of displaying each of the three colors used to produce all color on your monitor in 8-bits. That means it can display 256 levels of red, 256 levels of green. and 256 levels of blue. Thus, the total number of possible combinations is 256*256*256 = 256^3 = 16,777,216. That doesn't ...


3

As a photographer that prints regularly in a gamut much larger that his display space, I can tell you it's possible, with the complete understanding that your blind in some image areas on the image you will actually print. Even a monitor slightly larger than Adobe 1998 can not provide the coverage a high gamut process can. So this is the method I use: ...


3

1) Is it worth sucking it up and shelling out the dough for a calibrator, especially if don't print? Do these calibrators usually fix all issues like colors running hot and will my monitor be perfect after using one? Are they essential investments? Yes (a), no (b), yes(c). a.) As as serious hobyist it is key that the color you see while editing your photos ...


3

Why do you think your Macbook or IPhone & IPad has the calibrated screens or why are you trying to achieve those colors. As you have adequately put, you have did your research and bought the "best out of box color calibration and overall reviews for its class". Regarding your question, firstly you should use DVI, HDMI or even better DisplayPort port of ...


3

First, yours won't work well. From the NEC FAQ: Why are the Spyder color sensors not recommended for use with wide color gamut displays such as the LCD2690WUXi, LCD2690WUXi2, LCD3090WQXi, P221W, PA241W, PA271W and PA301W models? Our evaluation of these devices has determined that the accuracy of measurements when used with wide color gamut displays ...


2

You can read extensive revies and tests of gamut coverage, viewing angles, fitnees for photo work , etc. here: http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/reviews.htm Doing a quick search on the review page for "wide" you can get to some wide gamut options quickly. There is a Selector tool where you can input that you need a wide gamut for photo work: http://www....


2

I had also the same problem and tried following sensors: Spyder 4: spectraview profiler detectet also for calibration the Spyder 4 and did the job with an inconsistent result and with a high difference of Delta values. And, some times the calibration failed. i1 Display pro: After that I used a i1 Diplay pro and get the best and constant results for Deltas, ...


2

Comparing colors from any single uncalibrated display to any other uncalibrated display or print process will cause you all kinds of problems. It's best to begin to get all of your color processes calibrated. Then compare them under good light, meaning the same light you have set the white point of every color calibrated display. So if that is D50 then ...


2

There seems to be a good analysis of the issue here: http://www.color-management-guide.com/web-browser-color-management.html


1

Those displays seem to cover (most of) the DCI-P3 colour space, which is wider than the sRGB colour space. So at the very least, your editing should be done in a colour space that covers all of DCI-P3, and preferably at 16 bits/channel. Also, the final image should be in a colour space that is at least as large as DCI-P3, and that colour space should be ...


1

If your monitor covers the AdobeRGB gamut then it does that all the time usually. There are some high end monitors (BENQ and EIZO come to mind) that have modes for the sole purpose of quickly previewing things as though you're a "normal user" with a cheap monitor. But it has absolutely nothing to do with Adobe software suite. Your Greens will be the most ...


1

Here you can also test, which ICC version your browser supports: http://cameratico.com/tools/web-browser-color-management-test/ On Mac only Safari supports v2 and v4. Also it's rendering CSS values correctly/not completely oversaturated. But this is also described in the article provided by Andrew Sharpe in the other answer.


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