15

When a field of view is described as 120°, that refers to the total angle. So, 60° to the left of center and 60° to the right. Most camera lenses show a very restricted subset of the field of view perceived by the human eye and vision system. It is probably the case that the system is measured across the diagonal from corner-to-corner of a rectangle, ...


5

Why is zoom provided in Tokina 11-16mm? Tokina has specialized in zooms. The reputation of their AT-X lenses is basically built upon their acquisition of highly-regarded zoom technology from Angénieux. Their current lens lineup includes: Six primes: 20mm x2, 50mm, 100mm x2, 300mm. Fifteen zooms. Like their primes, many of their zooms duplicate the same ...


4

The point is versatility, so one can change from 11mm to 16mm or anywhere in between as needed, and not be restricted to just 11mm. I compose my shots so no cropping is required, unless something prevents me from doing so. I may prefer to have a zoom or two instead of a camera bag full of 20 different prime lenses. I do not see "fixing it in post ...


4

What you're probably looking for is a circular fisheye lens for APS-C. Fisheye lenses come in one of two types: circular or diagonal. Circular ones put the entire image circle inside the frame of the sensor, while diagonal ones are more traditional and project an image circle large enough to cover the entire sensor and yield a rectangular image. Keep in ...


4

Some options to consider: Meditate on what it means for ISO to be high. Use the 35/1.8. You can't get the shot you want with it, but you might still not get the shot you want with the zoom lens. Use slower shutter speeds. 1/125 may be faster than necessary. Since you state you are using the zoom lens for focal lengths wider than 35mm, 1/60 should be fine. ...


3

I assume the horizontal focal length in this video should be around 35-50mm on full-frame. You own a APS-C sensor size camera with a crop factor of 1.5 which means you can achieve this field of view with your lens at approx. 24-35mm. The thing is the "mood" of the clip is not only about the focal length. Notice the blur of the background in most of the ...


3

The iPhone certainly does NOT have focal lengths of 26 or 52 mm, which are implausible numbers. Because the camera body is only 7.7 mm thick, how could it contain a 26 or 52 mm lens? And also phone sensors are tiny, requiring very short focal lengths to see a normal field width. The 26 or 52 mm numbers are 35 mm Equivalent focal lengths, and is about the ...


3

It is easier to search for focal length and calculate the angle of view (AOV) based on that, as typically, we refer to lenses in terms of their focal length and not their AOV. This is because the focal length is a fixed value (okay, zooms can change in a certain range, but a 70-200mm cannot be changed to e.g. a 35-400mm). It is actually the angle of view ...


3

At least the following lenses will meet your stated requirements of circular 180° image for APS-C: Sigma 4.5mm ƒ/2.8 EX DC HSM Lensbaby 5.8mm ƒ/3.5 Circular Fisheye If you do go with a full frame camera body, there are some more options available. Look for 8mm lenses (some are even zooms, with 8mm at the wide end). Canon, Rokinon, and Sigma all make full ...


2

This is fairly typical for wide angle zoom lenses, even those that are a lot more expensive than the Tamron AF 20-40mm F2.7-3.5 SP Aspherical IF. Roger Cicala, the founder and chief lens guru at lensrentals.com, did a blog entry regarding this very thing a while back. Painting Zoom Lenses with a Broad Brush – Roger’s Law of Wide Zoom Relativity After ...


2

Depends how you define "single exposure". If we're talking about a single lens projecting light onto a single sensor this is a physical impossibility. With a DSLR or a (regular) smartphone, you always end up with multiple pictures being stitched together. But there are cameras out there specifically for 360° pictures that come with multiple lenses and ...


2

The lens field is circular, and does have an angular cone of view, like your funnel. However, the camera sensor captures a rectangular area within that cone, typically which just tightly fits into that cone. Meaning, the diagonal of that rectangle just fits the cone (normally, but there can be exceptions with smaller sensors). The cone has an circular ...


1

This totally depends on the circumstances. For example, if you are going to use the lens a lot, metal mount would be preferable. Similarly when shooting moving targets in low light (every artificially lit indoor environment is low light!) Sigma is better. However, don't ignore the weight aspect. If you are looking to have a wide angle lens all the time with ...


1

This will be a bit too long for a comment, but here I go. You need to be specific, not only for this specific forum but also in your approach to things. Get one scene, one, and analyze what you are interested in, what made you wonder something that you can not replicate. I only took a glimpse, but the truth is that I only saw one image that will be ...


1

"Anthropocentric" answer: because it wouldn't be the 11-16mm zoom then, but an 11mm prime. You could just as well ask why they don't make it a 16-300. Also, 11-16 isn't this little zoom. it's nearly 1.5x.


1

With any gear: The rule of thumb for getting photos without noticeable camera shake is: shutter_speed[s] ≤ 1[s] / (focal_length[mm] * crop_factor) Note that if you like pixel peeping, it will probably need much shorter shutter speeds (at least 2 thirds of a stop). E.g. for your 35mm lens, you should be good with something faster than 1/60s. Also note ...


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