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Oh yeah a quick and easy way that is kind of a cheat way is to go to Colors, Colorize then try to match it with the others layer's colour


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I think the key to the correct answer is "What did you expect to see?". For example if you take a shot of a completely green wall with auto white balance: Do you expect the wall photo to be more green or more gray? Auto white balance does not understand what it "sees": It will try to find some "white" and use that as a base. Now ...


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My short recommendation is "do not do that", or even better, "consider your priorities". Different settings are good for different purposes. I think a good analogy here would be trying to use rubber boots for running. Rubber boots are great when you are walking through mud (like night mode for doing something where colour reproduction is ...


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The major problem with "night mode" probably is that it's by no means standardized. What you did not talk about is the ambient light: Do you edit in complete darkness? If so, the color temperature of your display "white" would adjust your visual system to white (within limits). However if you have an ambient light, the whole situation is ...


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If changes to color temperature are problematic in night mode, avoid changing color temperature in night mode. The best way is to get color temperature right — by “right” I mean the way you want it — in camera. Getting color temperature right in the camera means there’s nothing to fix later on the computer. More important it means knowing the color ...


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TLDR: Turn Night Light off. Calibrate your monitor with a colorimeter. How to keep right color temperature if I edit photos with night light mode turned on? Normally, you can't because the intensity of Night Light/Shift, in some implementations, varies with the time of day. I have the "Night light" setting enabled almost always ... If the ...


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"Night Light" or "redshift" or other night light color apps don't do anything (as far as I know) to protect your eyes. Their intended function is to protect your sleep -- blue light is a signal to your system to remain awake. By reducing it for an hour or so before bedtime, the theory is that you'll find it easier to drop off to sleep ...


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After some more research I think I have an answer to my question. I'm saying the other answers are wrong, they sound very informed, but this is just what I've found about how the sliders of color temperature work, though not necessarily how cameras work or auto-WB or LR/ACR's algorithm for interpreting metadata. I watched a YouTube video about how to adjust ...


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