38

No, it won't work. The gray card works by reflecting ambient light (here "ambient" is used to include whatever flash, gels, etc. you're lighting your scene with other than the phone). You know it's supposed to be gray, so the difference between what you get and gray is the correction you need to make. By emitting pure gray light (assuming your phone can do ...


18

Ahhh...the "curse" of auto-white balance. I don't use AWB and ... based on reading, it seems like few photographers suggest using this feature. You did not mention a camera brand-model ... but that information would likely not change the response. If you shoot 'RAW' (which preserves the maximum amount of data and post-processing adjustment ...


8

After further research, here is a partial answer taking as source Blog-Couleur: Quelles sont les valeurs RVB de la colorchecker ? and BabelColor PDF and the Xrite website. The last row seems to be white 95%, neutral 80%, neutral 65%, neutral 50%, neutral 35%, black 20%. On trouve entre le blanc et le noir, une série de 4 gris : neutral 0.35, neutral 0.50,...


6

This sounds like the same problem people encounter when trying to photograph snow on automatic exposure. The camera will adjust the overall light value in your image to approximate middle grey. When the image is dominantly white, as in your case, the camera darkens the image, and I expect your smartphone is doing the same thing. In a DSLR, you can ...


6

White-Balance correction works best with a bright grey. Most grey surfaces work but precision is lower when the surface is darker. Correction will not work if any of the channels are clipped which is why too bright is a problem. The reason extreme brightness is problematic is that the camera is unable to figure out what transformation to apply if the ...


5

Commonly, when white balancing the temperature and tint parameters are mapped to a position on Planckian Locus, i.e. Blackbody temperatures, and the Delta uv on the corresponding iso-temperature line normal to the Planckian Locus, respectively. In the following CIE 1960 UCS Chromaticity Diagram, the Planckian Locus is the curved line in the middle, and the ...


5

I believe there is a misconception here. Doing a manual white balance, will not preserve the look of the lighting, it will try to neutralize the light and thus the rendition of color. How white balance works If you have a room with warm (incandescent) light, the light has a very yellow/orangish tone to it. Any object that is reflecting the light will ...


4

ISO and shutter duration are not the only thing that changed between these two frames. In addition to framing and posture noted by ths, the lighting has also changed. Look at the brick wall and the trees in the background. Parts that were in direct sunlight in the low ISO image are more shaded in the high ISO image. The clouds in the sky appear to have ...


4

ISO and speed aren't the only differences here. I count at least two others: posture of the subjects and framing. The second picture has more skin (the arms) and less greenery on top. Both could have influenced the auto WB algorithm. That's what you get when you rely on automatics…


4

Your greycard is not filling the frame. That won't help at all. Fill the entire frame with it. Focus is not important. Right now, you have a huge area of 'not grey' for the system to contend with. The whole idea of the white balance preset is that you present it with a known quantity - an 18% grey field, completely filling the frame, in the lighting you ...


4

Auto White-Balance guess color temperature by what is measured. This means that when the camera moves or subject moves, it can get different measurements which results in a different guess of color temperature. It is especially important if your scene has strong dominant colors. There is also a factor from lights, depending on their type. Some lights to not ...


3

The colors along the color temperature axis were "chosen" because they are the colors black bodies radiate as they increase in temperature. This includes everything from heated metals to the surfaces of stars, including our Sun. Almost all of the strong light sources found in nature emit light somewhere along or very close to the color temperature axis. We ...


3

It is not surprising at all that your two monitors display differently. At work, I have two monitors from the same batch (!) and they are almost as different as yours. (Incidentally, also Acer, but this applies to most consumer displays). If you had Spyder5, the problem would be solved. With a little workaround, or by using free 3rd-party software, you can ...


3

Let me try to swing a not-too-technical explanation of this… Start out with "what do I want to achieve?" Accurate colour, or a more 'emotional' representation of what the scene feels like to be there. The human eye corrects for white balance without you really being able to tell it's doing it, but by the time an image is on paper or a screen, that self-...


3

The official specifications are available on X-Rite website at this URL: https://xritephoto.com/ph_product_overview.aspx?ID=938&Action=Support&SupportID=5884. The specifications have changed in November 2014, hence the two sets. They are given in CIE Lab and the white point is CIE Illuminant D Series D50 with the following CIE XYZ values: [96.42, ...


3

There are two things probably going on here... The first is a metering issue...Cameras are smart, but they're not people. The meters assume a scene that is middle of the road, not super contrasty. So, if you hold a perfectly white board up in front of your camera and take a photo, then you'll get a photo of a grey card. Likewise, if you hold a perfectly ...


2

White balancing means making the neutral color of the scene (like a grey card) have a particular color temperature and tint in the output picture — to simulate color adaptation of human vision to the conditions of lighting in the scene. If we take a hyperspectral photo of a grey card in a room lit by incandescent light bulbs, spectral radiance of the ...


2

Two possibilities: You camera has a "Custom white balance" and will display the corresponding color temperature(*): take a picture of a gray chart or equivalent, apply custom white balance, check the result temperature. You can set arbitrary color temperatures in the camera's WB: shoot a series of pictures of a grey chart over a range of temperature ...


2

I think, what is happening here is what the photofinishing industry calls “subject failure”. You might think this jargon misses the mark, but I think it’s spot on. Our high-speed photofinishing printers analyzed each frame of a color negative or slide. The gathered data was used to set the intensity and color tint of the exposing light. I am talking color ...


2

Craftsman working metals, glass, ceramics, and the like, heat their materials until they glow with luminosity. These artisans have for centuries linked temperature with the glowing color. Heated objects first glow faint red at 930° F = 500°C = 770K. As the temperature upraises the glowing color shifts blood red, cherry red, salmon, orange, yellow, white, ...


2

Move the crop points slightly so that the squares are better centered in the patches before creating the profile. The problem seems to be associated with the X-Rite color checker autodetection. Even though the squares visually appear to be located within the color patches, part of the border is likely being used to create the profile. RawTherapee developers ...


1

We strive to make faithful images, however, we often fail for one reason or another. Imaging a white object ranks high on this list when it comes to difficulty. A pitfall is that incorrect exposure renders a white object too dark or too light. Likely, even when correctly exposed, the resulting image will have some unwanted tint. In other words, it is not ...


1

As you can see, with proper color management, the different tints of each filter do not significantly matter. Both filters can be properly corrected to match a calibrated image with no filter. That's because your color management software is adjusting each one differently to give the same result based on what it thinks the color should be. The most obvious ...


1

For a given lens/camera, all images taken with or without any filters will need WB correction to account for the varying shooting conditions. Even when no filters are involved, one can't use the same WB settings for an image taken in 2700K light that one would use for the same scene taken under 6400K light and expect the colors of the objects in the scene to ...


1

How is that blue (-) to yellow (+) is the a axis, and green (-) to red (+) is the b axis of the Lab color space (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CIELAB_color_space ). The third axis is "lightness", black to white, or intensity. It can make accurate white balance corrections. Can't say exactly why it was chosen for White Balance Temperature and Tint, ...


1

The phone is likely to be more problematic than other simple options (white paper). But it depends on the intended use I guess... The ambient/natural light will mix with the light emitted by the phone affecting the white balance, but how much will depend on the relative light levels... it would be easy for the phone screen to significantly overpower the ...


1

White balance does matter in Darktable. From the Darktable User Manual: 1.3.2.2. White balance The white balance module controls the white balance or color temperature of the image. It's always enabled and reads its default values from camera metadata embedded in the image. 3.4.1.10. White balance This module is used to set the white ...


1

The circles (water spots) are twofold: Film emulsions are made using gelatin as the binder to hold the light-sensitive salts of silver and the organic dyes in place. When placed in the developer, which is mainly water, the gelatin swells much like a dry sponge dunked into water. This swelling opens up the structure so the processing fluids can freely enter ...


1

Automatic white balance is your largest contributing factor here. When the camera is set to automatic anything it will generally treat each photo as a new shot location and evaluate the 'automatic' settings you have chosen on each fire. I've found higher ISO to contribute to more rich colors using a 5D, but it is so insignificant most people would not ...


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