9

First, realize that "color temperature" is but one axis that runs from amber to blue. Most natural light sources fall fairly close to the color temperature scale, expressed in Kelvin, because the color of a black body radiator is determined by its actual temperature. Stars are black body radiators. So are very hot metals. In the modern world, though, we ...


8

It's roughly true that light sources with the same color temperature have the same appearance. In fact, matching light sources in this way is exactly the reason we use the Kelvin WB scale in photography. However, there are three big caveats. First, there's also a magenta-green axis Human perception of color is complicated. White balance as measured in ...


7

After further research, here is a partial answer taking as source Blog-Couleur: Quelles sont les valeurs RVB de la colorchecker ? and BabelColor PDF and the Xrite website. The last row seems to be white 95%, neutral 80%, neutral 65%, neutral 50%, neutral 35%, black 20%. On trouve entre le blanc et le noir, une série de 4 gris : neutral 0.35, neutral 0.50,...


5

There may have been CRI issues. The lights are slightly yellowish, so have a relative deficit of blue. Since the hat is already dark, it doesn't reflect as much blue as you would have liked. Your white balance may also have been off just enough to affect the appearance of the hat. Objects reflect and absorb light, so the lighting in the scene isn't quite ...


4

White balance works on a color temperature scale, which adjusts color on a blue-orange spectrum. Green-magenta has to be adjusted separately because the color temperature adjustments don't really affect it. In the diagram, note that green-magenta is more-or-less orthogonal to the color-temperature curve.


4

Color calibration usually refers to adjusting a device, such as a monitor or printer, so that digital colors appear in a standard way. An image should look as close as possible to the same across different displays and media, and calibration is a necessary step for that. White balance, as you say, is adjusting an image so that the illuminant appears neutral ...


4

The lighting appears to be changing constantly. This is quite common at large concerts. Different types of lights, even those that appear to your eyes to be the same color, don't always have the same spectrum. The camera will very often maximize the differences between these light sources that our eye-brain systems tend to minimize. Sometimes you just have ...


4

ISO and speed aren't the only differences here. I count at least two others: posture of the subjects and framing. The second picture has more skin (the arms) and less greenery on top. Both could have influenced the auto WB algorithm. That's what you get when you rely on automatics…


4

ISO and shutter duration are not the only thing that changed between these two frames. In addition to framing and posture noted by ths, the lighting has also changed. Look at the brick wall and the trees in the background. Parts that were in direct sunlight in the low ISO image are more shaded in the high ISO image. The clouds in the sky appear to have ...


3

First off, color temperature is but one axis of what we call white balance or color balance. Color temperature is based on the light emitted by black body radiators at different temperatures expressed using the Kelvin scale. It runs from amber/orange on one end to blue/purple on the other. Roughly orthogonal to the amber ←→ blue axis is the green ←→ magenta ...


3

Well first of all if you shoot in RAW then you can tweak this process in postprocess, but I believe you're already know that. A White Balance is a way of saying what is a dominant light colour in the scene. This has nothing to do with "look right" or "correct". It says exactly what I stated. When you shoot outside then dominant light is sun that has it's ...


3

The goal is to make faithful images: A daunting task, because humans see using an eye/brain combination that alters our visualization of the world. This mechanism is eye independent. Try this experiment. Procure some transparent color filters, cellophane (candy wrappers work nicely). Filter one eye only with a deep red filter. Keep the filter in place for ...


3

Here are some causes for non-zero values that you expect to be zero. The most relevant to your problem are listed first. Your synthetic raw does not account for the input color profile of the camera, which is based on how the specific colors filter in the Bayer matrix interact with lighting sources when photographing calibration targets (with a lens, which ...


3

The official specifications are available on X-Rite website at this URL: https://xritephoto.com/ph_product_overview.aspx?ID=938&Action=Support&SupportID=5884. The specifications have changed in November 2014, hence the two sets. They are given in CIE Lab and the white point is CIE Illuminant D Series D50 with the following CIE XYZ values: [96.42, ...


2

Take a look at this question: Do I always get the same colours when I set the white balance correctly? Some cameras have different sensitivities to colors, and to tones. Some light has different wavelengths, and make "white" with different combinations of them. in-camera or lighting solution to this. Yes and no. It is a process. On the lighting side, ...


2

So the improved real world color accuracy is just a byproduct of color calibration? The intent is not to match the real world colors but to ensure that the colors appear the same between devices? There is no spoon real world, only perception. A white piece of paper stapled to a tree will look different to you based on time of day, illuminated by a street ...


2

Looks like "accent" or background lights are changing. In the future, you can try: Adjusting custom white balance according to the main lights, if possible. Taking lots of pictures to increase odds you'll get something you like. Converting selected images to black and white. Making selective adjustments using layer masks. Seeing other questions about ...


2

After a bit more code review, the SaturatedOpacity value in the sidecar file seems to correspond to: Color -> Color Toning -> Opacity -> Saturation Protection -> Strength slider/field entry SaturationThreshold would be the other parameter in that group. The mix of camelCase, PascalCase and lowercase can get a bit confusing at times... Based on this ...


2

There also appears to be either a color temperature shift towards amber/yellow as well as a white balance "correction" towards green, or a strong yellow color cast introduced by boosting the orange/yellow bands more than the other colors such as can be done with an Hue-Saturation-Luminance (HSL) tool. Some raw processing applications call such a tool HSB or ...


2

In the image you get before the thresholding, the darker the pixels, the closer the corresponding pixels in the photo are to the the 50% grey you filled the layer with. Then, by applying a threshold, you keep only the very dark pixels, that are the ones that where very close to the 50% grey in the initial image. So your black clusters are really a map of ...


2

I think, what is happening here is what the photofinishing industry calls “subject failure”. You might think this jargon misses the mark, but I think it’s spot on. Our high-speed photofinishing printers analyzed each frame of a color negative or slide. The gathered data was used to set the intensity and color tint of the exposing light. I am talking color ...


1

Consider the following snippet from a pp3 file created by RawTherapee: [ColorToning] SatProtectionThreshold=25 SaturatedOpacity=75 The settings are associated with the Saturation Protection settings of the Color Toning filter. They are available for most, but not, all of the methods. I chose "RGB - Sliders" because it is compact and fits well on screen.


1

If you use Lightroom for RAW development you could look at the Profile in the Basic tab. In my experience this impacts the way colours are rendered significantly.


1

Colored lighting produces single-channel blowouts that can't be fixed in post. The only real solution is to underexpose. I aim for a couple of stops underexposure in most concert situations. For every DSLR I've owned ISO 400 two stops under has the same noise performance as ISO 1600 exposed accurately. You're trading blocked shadows for blown highlights. For ...


1

There is a distinct blue-green tint in the pickguard in A, so you can adjust the white balance in A & B by making that neutral. Another place to check is the teeth. D isn't OK, it's quite reddish (compare the color of the wristwatch in C and D), but a slightly red skin is less disturbing than a greenish one.


1

A preset can either change a setting to a specific value or leave it as it is. A quick and easy way to have the preset not touch the white balance is the following: Apply the preset to an image. Right click the preset's name in the Presets pane and choose 'Update with Current Settings'. In the dialogue that pops up, untick 'White Balance'. Close the ...


1

Can you adjust white balance in a digital image... in such a way that average blurring the entire image gives gray (R=G=B)? Yes. But why would you want to do that? It's easier to desaturate. The following image made by adjusting colors and curves, not by decreasing saturation. Can you adjust white balance in Photoshop based on average blur? Yes. It's ...


1

No. Unless the subject is a perfect neutral color object. Take a photo of the leaves of a tree... the average will probably be green (depending on the season of course) Take an underwater image, and probably blue will be the dominating color.


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