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41

There are three main methods by which a dSLR/mirrorless camera can be used as a webcam. HDMI capture HDMI capture requires two things: that the camera can output "clean HDMI"; that is HDMI that doesn't have camera control overlays all over it, and an HDMI capture device to turn the HDMI output from the camera into a USB webcam input to the computer....


10

inkista has an excellent answer above. My Panasonic GX-80 doesn't support 'Lumix tether for streaming' - but it does have a Wifi function allowing you to watch a live preview from a smartphone. Over the course of a caffeine-fueled long weekend, and helped by the writings of people who'd tried similar things before me, I was able to get the wifi preview ...


8

I have been working on a project which also requires, more or less, a webcam with HD quality (something like 720p) and an optical zoom lens. There are such things for sale ... but they are industrial-strength, and industrial-priced, such as pan-tilt-zoom cameras for high-end videoconferencing equipment. And, of course, there are the commercial cameras that ...


6

There are at least two reasons this happens: There are very few pure (single / narrow frequency band) light sources. That is to say, your red light is not strictly confined to the "red" end of the visible light spectrum. It emits light in the yellow/green region of the spectrum (and probably just a little in the blue, as well). Similarly, your ...


5

2020 brought us (among other things) the EOS webcam utility. Officially the following EOS models are supported: EOS-1D X Mark II EOS-1D X Mark III EOS 5D Mark IV EOS 5DS EOS 5DS R EOS 6D Mark II EOS 7D Mark II EOS 77D EOS 80D EOS 90D EOS Rebel SL2 EOS Rebel SL3 EOS Rebel T6 EOS Rebel T6i EOS Rebel T7 EOS Rebel T7i EOS ...


5

What you want to do is head over to cloudynights.com, get an account, and start reading FAQs. A webcam isn't going to cut for DSO (deep space objects) but a decent DSLR will. However, without removing the infrared filter from your DSLR you'll not get the deep reds that you're used to seeing in other astrophotography photos. (See Happ Griffin's page for ...


5

It seems that light may be leaking in behind the sensor. Look for damage to the casing. Maybe the cure is a bit of black tape. I wouldn't think a device of this price is worth more than an ad hoc repair.


5

I finally solved the problem. I opened up the webcam cause I was curious at that point and a tiny plastic pin dropped out. It could happend since sometimes there are some plastic scratces due to the plastic piercings that were not complitely cleand out. Anyhow I reached the PCB itself where the lens is mounted on the CMOS sensor and I noticed that on the ...


4

The biggest difference is that a single, long exposure, photo is a single read off the sensor and the video stacking isn't, it's a sequence of frames, probably taken 25 or 30 times in a second. In terms of single versus stack, well, I can think of a few things to bear in mind with video: Video frames are usually smaller in size (length/width) so level of ...


4

In theory, there should be no problem. Just put your webcam sensor in the same distance as is the one in your DSLR. You must also cover the connection so no light other than from the lens can reach the sensor. Maybe some extension tubes will help you if you find them in proper length. The only issues I see are: Setting up Aperture. You must have older ...


4

I had the same issue/idea as you and decided to see if I could alter the camera to focus father away. After taking it apart, the four spokes don't appear to allow adjustment of the focus. They don't turn. As the camera focuses the lens assembly (including this 4 spoke thing) moves closer to the sensor (for far away focus) and farther from the sensor (for ...


4

I'm not sure I'd really give those attributes to webcams, which aren't usually particularly well-controlled for distortion. High depth of field is basically the result of small sensor size. Basically, a moderate wide angle lens will do — 28mm or so should match the FoV of a typical webcam, although you might go a little wider. Then, stop down as far as ...


4

Here's how you could refocus a Logitech C310 webcam: Open it up: Lens held on by two screws: Lens removed: Lens itself: All you need to do is slightly increase the space between the lens and the sensor. If you loosen the screws slightly, the space may be enough to bring the focus where you want it, or for a more preeminent solution you could add small ...


4

Under Linux you can simply install gphoto2 and v4l2loopback-dkms (package name might vary). Then simply run: sudo modprobe v4l2loopback exclusive_caps=1 card_label="GPhoto2 Webcam" Find out which webcam device it uses, in my case it was /dev/video2 and run: gphoto2 --stdout --capture-movie | ffmpeg -i - -vcodec rawvideo -pix_fmt yuv420p -threads 0 -f ...


4

In the YUYV format, the luma channel (Y) which controls the pixels brightness has a higher resolution than the chrominance (U and V) channels, which control the hue. Each pixel has its own brightness information, but two following pixels share the hue value. Your small image looks as if the downsampling algorithm has operated independently on the Y and on ...


3

Canon's beta software turns recent mirrorless, SLR, and point-and-shoot cameras into a webcam. Here's what you need to know. With USB webcams in short supply and demand skyrocketing due to the sharp spike in remote work, Canon has stepped in with a solution. Its new software, the EOS Webcam Utility, is available as a free download, and turns your Canon EOS ...


3

I've done this previously in Windows with a Cannon EOS 5D Mk II, and my kludgy solution was to use a combination of the live view function of the Cannon EOS Utility, and some software to turn a portion of the screen into a virtual web cam, I believe I used ManyCam for that. Basically I connected the camera to the PC and fired up the Cannon EOS Utility then ...


3

Under the plastic cover, most webcams have a screw-thread mount for the lens to set focus at time of assembly; it's usually easy to remove the cover and set the focus as needed. You could also use any low power positive lens as a macro lens, e.g. inexpensive one or two diopter glasses, with some sort of temporary mount. Not pretty, but OK for brief use. You ...


3

What is probably going on has little to do with the camera sensor, per se. When the signal from the sensor is processed there is noise reduction applied. It seems that in the case of your webcam, the processor recognizes a "noise only" black frame and goes ahead and eliminates all of the signal to get rid of the noise.


3

You will likely run into issues due to the extremely small size of the sensor and the much larger sensor that an SLR lens is designed for. In theory, you might be able to move it closer to focal point of the lens if the lens' design allows, but I'm not sure if it would even be able to focus. You really probably either want a webcam that includes a built in ...


3

With a raspberry pi you can use a picam (dedicated camera board). I've used one for a timelapse over several days, and in my reading for that found people who are doing much longer timelapses. The picam quite a decent fixed/manual focus cane and you can fix the exposure, use auto exposure, or take one photo with each mode, storing in separate folders. The pi ...


3

Why do color channels from a digital camera respond slightly to lights of other colors? Because the filters placed in front of the silicon on a Bayer masked filter all allow some of all the wavelengths of visible light to pass through. They just allow more of the light at wavelengths near the color of each filter to pass. Back in the days of B&W film ...


3

Did I miss something? Yes. The article you cite and upon which your entire project seems to be based does not require a photo to be taken and measured. The article is from the film age before digital imaging was anything but a lab exercise for anyone other than NASA and their deep space probes. It doesn't even require film to be in the camera. It is based ...


3

I have an E-M10 III on-hand, and it does not support usage as a webcam. The E-M5 II and the entire E-M1 range can be operated in a 'tethered' mode, but this functionality does not extend to Oly's beginner E-M10 series. Some tutorials suggest using an HDMI capture stick, so that you can capture the video out of the camera. This will also not work for the E-...


3

If you have a Canon or Nikon camera, and a Windows PC, Sparkocam might be a solution. It enables you to connect the camera via USB, and use the camera for for example Skype. I have used my Canon EOS 700D with SparcoCam, and it works well. It is free to try, but costs $49.95 for a standard license for either Canon or Nikon (upgrades for 1 year). From Sparsoft....


3

For Mac users - a new webcam app. I'm adding this to existing 'webcam' questions for future searchers. I am in no way affiliated with this product or the company making it - this is a simple user to user recommendation. I just discovered this today, announced on DPReview a new product called Cascable Pro Webcam £40 [£30 for the first week to 24 July 2020] I'...


2

I have made 2 adapters which enable a webcam to be used with a 35mm camera lens. The first enables the use of M42 screw-fit lenses, the second enables the use of Canon Bayonet fit lenses. The construction of each is similar, however the Canon fit unit is more complicated owing to the mount details. Therefore I will detail the M42 screw fit only. I am ...


2

What is your budget? One approach is to get/buy/rent a DSLR that can provide a "live view" video feed. Then just use the appropriate tethering software. For my Canon 50D, which is a 5 year old camera, the standard Canon "EOS utility" will take the video feed on both Windows and Mac computers.


2

I have a clone of that scope. Webcam is the way to go for bright objects. You'll want a cam that can do subframes to limit data to just the area of interest. Another feature would be one that polls the whole ccd at once, rather than one that does interlacing. Several are reasonably priced and appear on the second hand market. Bright objects like the ...


2

If you haven't already, check out the high-end webcam options, like the Logitech C920. Most DSLRs & mirror-less cameras, as well as some point-and-shoots, support tethered shooting over USB. This may require specific software for some cameras Some have an API/SDK you can use to write your own software (e.g. Canon) You can also use libgphoto2 for ...


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