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Weather Sealing is protection of the internal parts of a camera from external influences such as moisture, dust, and humidity. The degree of this weather sealing varies between manufacturers and also within models by each manufacturer. The protection is provided by both rubber sealing with silicon rings and gaskets as well as design considerations such as ...


18

There are several separate issues involved with your question. Let's look at each in turn. Sudden temperature changes When materials are subjected to sudden temperature changes they can tolerate the change or can be irreversibly damaged. It all depends on the materials involved, the temperature extremes involved, and just how rapid the change is. Take any ...


7

There are plenty such models with some in every category. The highest resistance to inclement weather are waterproof cameras which are all point-and-shoot model with a sealed non-extending lenses. These can even go underwater between 3 to 12m for a minimum of 60 minutes. Weather-poof cameras are sealed against splashes in any direction but are not ...


7

I've lived in Canada for a long time now. And my Nikon lenses have always been fine going from a comfy 25 degrees to minus 40 in a matter of minutes. Apart from some lens misting which I need to wipe sometimes, they've been impeccable.


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Changing environments, especially those that are as extreme the ones you describe, can damage your equipment for reasons you've already described within your question. Different materials react to temperatures differently. This includes expansion, contraction, and changes in brittleness. Warmth and humidity are favorable to fungus. Water can condense and ...


5

You didn't link to any specific product but from what I can find by googling "650d silicone case" those products provide no water/dust protection whatsoever. The big opening in the camera that let dust/water in are, in order of importance: The lens mount The battery door Various connectors (USB etc.) Buttons and dials Any case that only covers some of the ...


5

In my experience, most well-padded bags will hold dry in medium rain even for several hours. They will get soaked, but very, very slowly. The only source of immediate leaking could be the zippers. So the advise to the cautious would be to buy well-padded bags with weather-proofed zippers. Note that it also depends on the design of the bag - e.g. mine has a ...


4

Check the specs of your camera wrt temperature. If Canon says it'll be fine, bring a couple spare batteries because cold saps battery power. As for the temperature difference between outside and inside, what you need to worry about is condensation on the camera + lens. This will occur whenever a much colder item is moved into a warmer environment. The ...


4

DA* are top-of-the-line Pentax lenses. According to Pentax, they are the best lenses ever made and they include weather-resistance but the DA* label means a lot more, including ultra-sonic motor and a commitment to excellent quality. AW label introduced for DSLRs along with the DA 560mm F/5.6 ED AW. It is also used to designate weather-sealed lenses for ...


4

I can vouch for the Canon 1 series, I've used both the 1Ds mkII and 1D mkIV for extended periods in the driving rain. You need a weather sealed lens, most L series are, you can usually tell by if there's a rubber skirt around the mount. I don't bother with a filter as the lens hoods on the primes I shoot with a really deep and stop water going anywhere near ...


4

Sometimes you just have to pay your money and take your chances. Some things to consider: The Fuji XT-2 has an ambient temperature operating rating of -10°C to +40°C. The Fuji XT-20 has an ambient temperature operating rating of 0°C to 40°C. The Fujinon XF35mmF2 R WR has an ambient temperature operating rating down to -10°C. The Fujinon XF35mmF1.4 ...


3

Professional level DSLR cameras many times can be used without issues in the rain. Some of them require a filter to complete the weather sealing of the lens. There isn't necessarily a "kind", just look for "weather sealing" and to what degree it is weather sealed. Note, you would want a lens and a DSLR body that is weather sealed, not just one or the other. ...


3

The main issue with any "how weather sealed is my Canon DSLR" question, is that they are not rated to a depth of waterproofing. And how else would one measure this? "The Canon 50D can withstand the rain of 1/4" per hour coming perfectly vertical with XYZ lens"? Canon does not provide this information, and the information you will find on the internet will ...


3

When a lens is specified as "weather sealed" it means that the lens will be somewhat resistant to external sources of things such as water and dust only when both the lens and camera are "weather sealed" and the lens is attached to the camera. "Weather resistant" never means "water proof" or "hermetically sealed.&...


2

The 50D is not officially weather-sealed but does have some protection so you can get by in light rain or snow but I would not take it in rougher conditions.


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Weather sealing generally consists of light o-ring seals around any openings and water/dust resistant sealing on the controls. Weather sealing is only as effective as the weakest link. If the lens isn't weather sealed, then no amount of weather sealing on the body will keep it weather sealed. It will make some difference from direct exposure to rain, but ...


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1) A camera is weather sealed if it has - you guessed it, weather seals. Most importantly on buttons and openings but also along the case. The level of weathersealing varies - and it is also weathersealed not waterproof which some people think it is. 2) A non-sealed lens can allow water to enter the camera via the lens but more importantly via the lens ...


2

Most important - Don't let the camera come in direct contact with salt water or sand When you change lenses go indoors (even inside a closed car will do) to prevent airborne sand and water from entering the camera. When moving between cold (air conditioned) and hot areas put the camera in an airtight bag (or as close to airtight as you can, a closed camera ...


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According to the information provided by Canon, the 25-105mm F/4L is weather-sealed, that is why we use the umbrella icon in its specification page. Some Canon lenses require a screw-on filter to complete the seal but this is not one of them. The exact wording from Canon is: Tight seal structure ensures excellent dust-proof and drip-proof performance. ...


2

I've used the EF 24-105mm f/4 L IS for short periods in light to medium rain with no ill effects before. Mine has also survived collisions with football players, bumps from working in a dense crowd, and the occasional 'soft' drop from a foot or two. The thing is built like a tank. But, as AJ Henderson points out in his answer, it is also a lens with ...


2

I use Canon Cameras and at first, I was also in the same dilemma as you. That is until I went shooting with a client in what I considered heavy rain. He just went ahead popped his camera and started shooting, leaving me find shelter. later he explained what I had witnessed, the benefits of the Weather Seal. However, we must remember, these seals are ...


2

Are "weather sealed" gear tested for how good their "weather sealing" is? AFAIK, cameras aren't tested and rated against some independent standard -- if they were, manufacturers would certainly advertise that fact. Equipment is usually described as being weather sealed if it is, and weather sealing just isn't mentioned if it's not. Equipment reviews ...


2

The D5300 is an entry-level DSLR and is not weatherproof at all. As most cameras, it will handle a few drops of water or snow but you should not let it get wet. Weatherproof DSLRs and mirrorless exist and they will be able to stand up to strong rain without issues as long as a weatherproof lens is also attached. All camera manufacturers except Pentax/Ricoh ...


2

There is only one Sigma Art lens with is weatheproof and that is the Sigma A 12-24mm F/4 DG HSM. Many of the Sport series are weatherproof though. A clear filter will not help as there is no sealing on the mount. The one you are looking for is probably the 24-35mm F/2 DG HSM as it will work on your Canon 6D. The Art 18-35mm you mention only works for ...


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Definitely, the problem is mostly water that drips, and in practice water remains in the bag's fabric (or is absorbed by the padding). I even spilled about a glass of white wine(*) in my photo bag and the lenses and camera survived. (*) long story, let's say that a half-bottle (37.5cl) of Muscadet fits nicely in the space left by a Sigma 120-400mm. Lesson ...


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Won't any fixed lens zoom be pumping air in and out as it expands and contracts, at least partially negating a major advantage of weather sealed FZ300? Yes they will negate weather sealing partially - because weather sealing of most cameras rarely includes humidty (vaporized water) sealing. There cannot be any significant pressure increase or vacuum inside ...


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Most commercial 'outdoor' cameras with external power supplies are made to fit inside protective domes or other types of sealed enclosures to protect them from the elements. Many use protective conduit to route the cables to the camera. The most sophisticated ones even have 'self-cleaning' features, such as 'windshield wipers' or air jets to clean the ...


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The most authentic information available for the D5300 is the official manual. Here is the link: http://download.nikonimglib.com/archive2/BTcII00t9KUv024jW9c13oRqeg68/D5300VRRM_(En)02.pdf Specifically, in the "Caring for the Camera" section, there are several important indicators as to how weatherproof your camera really is, for example: Keep dry : This ...


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Not sure if it is or not but I took my D5300 up Snowdon while it was raining and hailing, camera got drenched but it is still in good condition


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