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5

It is likely a Canon FL mount. If you are looking for an adapter, it is compatible with the Canon FD mount using stop-down metering. See Evolution of the Canon FD Mount. If you'd like, you can measure the mount diameter to compare with a list of lens mounts (alphabetical, by-register, Wikipedia).


5

Why are the f-stops mirrored under the focus ring? It's a scale that shows you approximate depth of field at the selected aperture. So if you select f/16, you can look at distances on the focus ring at the two lines marked 16 to get an idea of the nearest and farthest distances that will be in focus. What is the red line pointing to "16" on the right? I ...


4

I can only answer a small subset of the questions you asked and speculate about some others, but perhaps these would be enough to give you an orientation to this lens and its basic operation. There is no industry standard for these markings. There isn't even a vendor standard, as vendors are apt to change things up over time. (Mostly toward having fewer ...


4

Just my 2 cents. That lens looks like is a manual lens. I have a Vivitar Series 1, that was a pretty good lens, Vivitar's top of the line back in the days. But now is really quite difficult to have a sharp focus manually. Especially if you want to use a wide aperture. The 28 mm focal length is most likely covered if you have the kit lens. For Portrait are ...


3

There is nothing to "fix". This lens has no electrical connections to be made to the Nikon D3400. Because there's no electrical connections to be made, the camera doesn't even know there's a lens attached, or determine the type of lens attached. Thus, you have to set your camera to Manual exposure mode, and set ISO, aperture, and shutter speed yourself — ...


3

The meter coupling prong is a dead giveaway that it is a Nikon F mount "A" (Pre-AI or non-AI) lens. Your serial number indicates it is a Version 6. All of the Version 6 examples were fixed mounts, so no T-mount adapters for this lens. Earlier versions that had a T-mount that could be used with adapters were Version 1 (1966), Version 2 (1966-67), Version 3 (...


3

This is either a Vivitar T4 or TX series lens. T4 and TX lenses are interesting because they were designed to be mount-agnostic; that is, they have interchangeable mount adapters, so you could move your lens to bodies with different mounts, just by getting the appropriate Vivitar T4/TX adapter. As Gabe Krause's answer indicates, this particular lens has the ...


3

I would venture to say that it's a Miranda Bayonet Mount. I use visual references and measurements to positively determine a mount. I would advise that you do the same before investing in another adapter. But your lens does have MIR imprinted which is a good clue. Confirm what you have with these resources: http://members.tripod.com/rick_oleson/index-99....


3

That is a Canon FD mount lens. While you could find an adapter to mount it on a D3200, it's problematic, even for adapting onto a Canon dSLR. The main problem here is the registration distance. This is the distance that the lens is held by the mount away from the image plane (the sensor, in the case of a dSLR). This distance varies between mount systems, ...


3

Vivitar is a third-party lens maker that can make a lens in a variety of camera mounts, so there's no way anyone can answer your question without being able to see the specific lens you're talking about. I'd suggest looking through a visual guide to lens mounts to see if the Vivitar uses the mount for the Minolta AF or Sony A-mount systems (the mount the ...


3

That looks like the Konica AR mount. The last cameras that used this mount were produced up to 1987. I still own a Konica FS-1 camera body (made from 1979 to 1983) that I bought used in the mid-1980s just before Konica abandoned the SLR camera market. The Konica AR mount had a flange focal distance of 40.5mm and a throat diameter of 47mm. The Nikon F-mount ...


3

Since the letters "MC" are stamped on the ID ring along with the other information I would think it is a Minolta MC/MD mount lens. Even if the "MC" stand for "multi-Coated" and was printed on the lens for all of the various mounts for which it was made, the "MC" led me to compare it to the Minolta mount. The bayonets match up with the Minolta pattern as ...


3

The N/Ai indicates that it's a Nikon AI mount lens. This does fit your D3100. There are some caveats listed on the Nikon compatibility chart linked. But, to summarize, yes - it should mount and work (as well as an old manual lens can be expected to work).


3

Old flashes designed for film cameras use a much higher voltage than modern ones and can damage modern cameras. It sounds like you are overexposing your photos so you will need to lower ISO and/or stop down the aperture. The chart on the back will tell you how much to achieve a decent exposure at a given distance. Shutter speed is constant at the sync ...


3

Vintage flash units are to be operated manually. In other words, you set the shutter speed and the lens aperture based on conditions. First the shutter speed. Check your camera manual to determine what shutter speed (speeds) you can use with a flash. This falls under a heading called synchronization. Electronic flash units are "X" synchronization. X ...


2

First option You are simply at the end of the roll. Press the film release button and rewind the film. If you can't do that, open the camera in the dark, remove the film, and rewind it manually. Maybe you can discern the problem in the dark. If you don't care about exposing the film, you can simply open the camera to inspect for a loading error. Second ...


2

The center pin will fire the flash on any camera. To be safe use a High Voltage Sync Regulator. Here is a link to one on B+H: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/245292-REG/Wein_W990560_Safe_Sync_Hot_Shoe_to.html This is the first one I found and I'm sure they're are other brands that will work just as well. I used to have one a few years ago, but where ...


2

The reason your camera is saying there is no lens attached is because the T-mount does not allow any communication between the camera and lens. To use those lenses you must have your D3100 in both manual exposure and manual focus mode. Since there is no "release shutter without lens" option in the camera's menu, you may not be able to use theses lenses at ...


2

...I just answered my question about the macro/ wide angle lens - you just screw it on to the end of the zoom lens :)


2

To directly answer your request for the steps: Put camera in manual (M) mode on the top dial Adjust ALL settings (shutter, ISO, aperture, focus) manually as needed Shoot "Git Gud" at manual mode As mentioned in another answer: The lens is likely manual and the adapter is only a mechanical adapter, to make it physically connect, but there is no logical ...


2

Your lens probably doesn't have CPU contacts so the body doesn't recognize it. Switch the camera to manual mode, set a shutter speed in camera, change the aperture from lens (if available), focus using the lens and enjoy.


2

TL;DR: You can mount this lens on a Nikon DSLR only with a "speedbooster" lens adapter. seller says fits canon 49mm. won't fit my camera since I have nikon D5500 which I think is 52mm The "⌀49mm" means the lens takes 49mm filters (the circle with the line through it is the diameter symbol). I'm not sure what the seller refers to by "Canon 49mm" (or by ...


2

Looks like an older Nikon AI mount. It may have a removable Vivitar T mount where you can swap out the Nikon mount for a Canon one, but I can't tell from the photo.


2

The Vivitar 1900 is a very simple manual flash, that has no power level controls. I would not consider it safe to use the flash in the hotshoe of your Sony NEX-6 because of the high trigger voltage. I would use a “safe sync” or wireless remote to trigger the flash to protect the camera’s circuitry. Use the NEX-6 in Manual mode so you have full control ...


1

The Nikon EM film SLR used the Nikon F-mount which is still used by modern Nikon DSLRs. Therefore, a lens which fits the EM will also fit a modern Nikon DSLR. However, depending upon the lens there may be limitations when used on a DSLR which restricts its usefulness. As an example, the Vivitar 35-105mm is a manual focus lens and so would not auto-focus on ...


1

For buying used lenses, especially ones made by 3rd Party manufacturers, it's always best to do your homework. A Lens that is designed for Canon or Nikon can only work on the designed manufacturer without an adapter; which an adapter can cost hundreds of dollars defeating the purpose of getting the cheap lens. It's also good to find out as much details about ...


1

The photo is a little fuzzy, so I am not positive, but that looks to be a Pentax K mount. It will not fit without the help of an adapter like this.


1

Very briefly, lenses are generally only compatible with one particular mount, so if you want a lens for a Minolta Maxxum 5D, then you need to buy an A-mount lens, which is the name of the mount used on that camera. Minolta developed the A-mount for their interchangeable-lens autofocus cameras, and Sony also uses the A-mount. (Be aware though that Sony also ...


1

The SF-4000 is a manual-only flash. If you look at the foot, it only has a single pin. This isn't unreasonable for a $20 flash unit. It will fire in sync so that the light will register in the image when you take the shot. But it won't understand 2nd curtain sync, HSS, or eTTL signaling, and it cannot be controlled from the camera menu--that type of ...


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