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21

Yes it is. Including the box when reselling items increases their perceived value. You will often see LNIB in listings which means Like New In Box. It tells you are a more careful owner. This is particularly important for cameras or bodies in the case DSLRs and SLDs which have lots of small pieces (cables, caps, manuals) and depreciate in value quickly. I ...


12

I'm not too sure about your mount questions, but I do collect working vintage gear. Here's what I do and look for... If applicable, bring a battery - There's really no excuse not to bring a fresh battery for the camera you're interested in. Bring a pen light - your cellphone light may also work. You just want to be able to really see inside the nooks and ...


8

I'm sorry that all of this is based on US situations, feel free to edit anything that doesn't apply. Hopefully this gives you an idea though. I looked briefly into this since there seems to be demand for local pick-up and drop-off in my area. Here are a couple things to keep in mind. Insurance Insurance starts is around $.50 - $1.00 per $1000 of ...


8

I have a 1Ds mkII and an original 5D. The fact I still have them is mainly due to the fact that they're worth a lot more to me that I would get from selling them. In other words I think they're probably undervalued on the second hand market. The main reason I say this is that the look you get from a full frame sensor is in many ways unobtainable with a ...


8

If your friend is truly referring to photographers that take thousands of images per week, yes they likely will wear out the shutter in about a year or so. Note that the shutter can be replaced for a reasonable cost. Most amateurs don't take thousands of photos a week and even many working pros do not outside of some specific areas such as action and ...


7

Personally, I would say yes to keep boxes and packaging of lenses, not so much for tripods. If you'll ever ebay lenses, or want to ship a L lenses for inspection or realignment. Having the original packaging save you time and extra cash buying new bubble wraps.


7

The 100-300mm f/4.5-5.6 USM is a better lens than the 75-300 III. It is sharper, has better build, and most importantly has very fast Ring Type USM Auto Focus. It also has a non-rotating front element which is great when using a polarizer. A +8 rating from a reputable store means you should feel safe buying it and could always return it if there is a ...


6

Rebel X (EOS-500/Kiss XS without pop-up flash) is a fairly recent entry level body. It uses EF lens mount, so the lenses should work fine with current Canon DSLRs. The flash hot-shoe is also compatible with current models, although Rebel X did not support E-TTL. The flash will work on a Canon dSLR, but the features it will offer depend on the flash and ...


6

How bad is this? It depends. On what is causing the haze and how bad it currently is. The cause could be as varied as: fungus, lens separation (the glue holding elements together hardening and letting go), high amounts of dust inside the lens, etc. The cause will also determine if it is reversible, stable, or only going to get worse. On what your intended ...


5

Test it - if you haven't used it in a while make sure everything still works (also, especially in the case of lenses, you may want to add a picture taken with this lens to the sales listing) Clean it - be careful, you really don't want to damage the equipment now - but removing visible smudges and dirt will help with the next step Photograph it - this will ...


5

KEH and B&H Photo would be the big two in the US. Other big camera dealers like Adorama also sell used gear. B&H offers a 90 day warranty on used gear. KEH has a 6 month warranty and 14 day no questions asked return policy


5

Generally (I can't speak for Nikon) refurbished equipment is used\broken\defective equipment that has been returned to a manufacturer. The manufacturer will then refit, clean, and repackage the item to factory specifications (as if it were new) and then sell it at a discounted price. Refurbished items generally have a shorter warranty, but since they ...


5

That isn't damage, it's the rubber flap that covers the hole where the cord for an external power source enters the camera. You'll find an illustration of how it works on page 311 of the owner's manual. That one just looks like it isn't properly seated and should pop easily back into place.


4

One I always hear about is KEH. They are in Georgia.


4

It's all about risk-reward. Your risk is getting a camera that fails. Your reward is saving money. Like most financial transactions you have to be the judge of what risk you're willing to accept for what reward. A few things to keep in mind to reduce the risk: When buying used bring along a memory card and something to look at the photos on outside the ...


4

Opinion. Electrical engineering a specialty. Rubs shoulders with Mechanical engineering: It really is personal preference, and there are no hard and fast rules. Anything that a user did that was severe enough to significantly decrease shutter life you'd expect to show up in other areas as well. If it looks like it's been very roughly treated then that may ...


4

These were great cameras then and they are still great cameras today. Actually the age factor makes them great values because people flock to newer things too quickly! A 1Ds Mark II remains superior to the latest APS-C Canon DSLRs when it comes to image quality. It shows less noise, greater dynamic-range and better low-light performance. Plus, you will ...


4

It very much looks like someone sprayed the lens(es) with silicone oil to make it look shiny and new. Just the thing you would do to the dashboard of an old car you are about to sell. This time the previous owner has 'overdone' it big time, resulting in some of the oil seeping inside the lens. This oil is very thin and goes thru real tight gaps. But it is ...


4

The default status of photographs is automatically that they're under copyright and unless you have some sort of license agreement with the person who made them, it would be illegal for you to publish them, modify them or do pretty much anything except look at them.


4

I do not think that there is a good answer to this without knowing the exact camera model and how it was used. For example, shooting video might exercise the mirror and shutter less, but may cause much greater thermal cycling of the sensor and electronics (at least one of my cameras gets very hot to the touch after shooting a lot of video).


4

I think there is some urban myths regarding this, and that this has to do with the CCD/CMOS debate some time ago. CCD sensors really heated up so much that they cannot record video. The technology then switched to CMOS, that can support video seamlessly, and not heating that much. Obviously, having the sensor to be working for hours taking video instead for ...


4

Could slightly older models effectively have substantial differences with the newer ones? Yes. However, I'm concerned about some features they may not include; I'm not talking about pro-level features such as IR transmission (which is something that I don't need right now) but maybe compatibility with flash transmitters, proper TTL, recharge time, focal ...


3

I've had a 5D, and currently have a 1DsII. If you can get a DsII for the price of a 5D, I'd say that is the one to prefer. The autofocus on any 1D is top notch, and far better than the one on the 5D (the 5D was basically a 30D with a full-frame image sensor). 5D is a little bit better on high ISO (1600, 3200) on the pixel level, on the other hand the 1Ds2 ...


3

You should test it. First, check its metering and compare its result with an external light meter. Then you should test the shutter. If you were buying from me, I'd offer you shoot a roll of film with it. Also take a photo with a long exposure time while with the lens cap on to know if camera's body is not healthy. Shake the camera and make sure it does not ...


3

It would help to know if you're an amateur or professional. If it's for professional/paid use then it should be listed on your insurance anyway. Insurance takes care of liability and equipment problems. If you're an amateur then you might consider a personal articles policy for insuring your equipment. In the US camera equipment is not generally covered by ...


3

It's a question of what the warranty covers and what you expect to need it for. IMO, 90 days is enough time for you to test the lens thoroughly enough to know it's not a lemon and to give it a work out. If the extended warranty is -- like most warranties -- specifically to cover things like workmanship, I don't think it's worth it. After you've had enough ...


3

Professionally, I run a 1D MkI (Classic) for sports / action photography and a 1Ds MkI for portraiture. The colour / contrast on my 1D classic is stunning and is the only Eos that allows 1/500th X-sync (a 1Dx can't manage that!). I have only three lenses: 16-35mm 2.8L, 50mm 1.4 prime, 70-200mm 2.8L. The x1.3 crop factor on the 1D gives me options on my ...


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