12

I'm not too sure about your mount questions, but I do collect working vintage gear. Here's what I do and look for... If applicable, bring a battery - There's really no excuse not to bring a fresh battery for the camera you're interested in. Bring a pen light - your cellphone light may also work. You just want to be able to really see inside the nooks and ...


8

If your friend is truly referring to photographers that take thousands of images per week, yes they likely will wear out the shutter in about a year or so. Note that the shutter can be replaced for a reasonable cost. Most amateurs don't take thousands of photos a week and even many working pros do not outside of some specific areas such as action and ...


7

The 100-300mm f/4.5-5.6 USM is a better lens than the 75-300 III. It is sharper, has better build, and most importantly has very fast Ring Type USM Auto Focus. It also has a non-rotating front element which is great when using a polarizer. A +8 rating from a reputable store means you should feel safe buying it and could always return it if there is a ...


6

How bad is this? It depends. On what is causing the haze and how bad it currently is. The cause could be as varied as: fungus, lens separation (the glue holding elements together hardening and letting go), high amounts of dust inside the lens, etc. The cause will also determine if it is reversible, stable, or only going to get worse. On what your intended ...


6

Short answer, yes, this issue is expected. That Copal No. 1 is probably between thirty and sixty years old, and in professional service would have been expected to receive a CLA (Clean, Lube, Adjust) service every two to five years. Amateurs like us don't use a shutter anything like as much as a commercial photographer would have done before the digital era,...


5

Generally (I can't speak for Nikon) refurbished equipment is used\broken\defective equipment that has been returned to a manufacturer. The manufacturer will then refit, clean, and repackage the item to factory specifications (as if it were new) and then sell it at a discounted price. Refurbished items generally have a shorter warranty, but since they ...


5

That isn't damage, it's the rubber flap that covers the hole where the cord for an external power source enters the camera. You'll find an illustration of how it works on page 311 of the owner's manual. That one just looks like it isn't properly seated and should pop easily back into place.


4

The default status of photographs is automatically that they're under copyright and unless you have some sort of license agreement with the person who made them, it would be illegal for you to publish them, modify them or do pretty much anything except look at them.


4

I think there is some urban myths regarding this, and that this has to do with the CCD/CMOS debate some time ago. CCD sensors really heated up so much that they cannot record video. The technology then switched to CMOS, that can support video seamlessly, and not heating that much. Obviously, having the sensor to be working for hours taking video instead for ...


4

I do not think that there is a good answer to this without knowing the exact camera model and how it was used. For example, shooting video might exercise the mirror and shutter less, but may cause much greater thermal cycling of the sensor and electronics (at least one of my cameras gets very hot to the touch after shooting a lot of video).


4

Could slightly older models effectively have substantial differences with the newer ones? Yes. However, I'm concerned about some features they may not include; I'm not talking about pro-level features such as IR transmission (which is something that I don't need right now) but maybe compatibility with flash transmitters, proper TTL, recharge time, focal ...


3

There is actually very little difference between these cameras outside of their brand but that has an implication on what lenses you can have now and in the future, so you should read How much do lenses vary across platforms? to understand what you would be getting into, since as you probably noticed, changing systems is costly. From the specification side, ...


3

I use a slightly different approach that I think is better. I simply take a photo of my contact information and leave it on my memory card. I keep one in the regular DCIM folder as well as one outside of it. Its simple, and I believe it to be effective although I've never proven so. In reality the only thing I care about is the images I've captured on my ...


3

If the lenses are not currently made to mount on Nikon DSLR bodies (i.e., Nikon F-mount), then no, you probably cannot buy an adapter to use them on your Nikon body. The reason for this is that Nikon's F-mount has one of the largest flange focal distances (also known as registration distance) for currently-available DSLR bodies on the market. I believe your ...


3

The primary concern is really the shutter count. If the camera was used heavily or will be used heavily, it will likely be the first point of failure and can be be replaced. It is arguably the most "consumable" part of a DSLR. It isn't necessarily bad to get a used camera with a high shutter count, but you should pay less for one with a high shutter ...


3

Professionally, I run a 1D MkI (Classic) for sports / action photography and a 1Ds MkI for portraiture. The colour / contrast on my 1D classic is stunning and is the only Eos that allows 1/500th X-sync (a 1Dx can't manage that!). I have only three lenses: 16-35mm 2.8L, 50mm 1.4 prime, 70-200mm 2.8L. The x1.3 crop factor on the 1D gives me options on my ...


3

I think the ball bearing has come out of position on the optical stabaliser (sounds similar to an issue I had). To get to it you need to strip down the lens to its bones to re-seat. Tried to do it myself but broke a ribbon cable inside and…well it's stuffed, but the image doesn't jump any more.


3

Am I missing something? No. I don't think there's any good reason not to buy a lens which has been used for videography. My best guess would be that the person who told you this has misinterpreted something they've been told.


3

To answer directly, as asked, a lens that has a focus motor when used for video has a motor that is in operation frequently during video shooting while when used for taking stills the motor is used far less often. You write, they said: "I was told by a fellow (amateur) photographer to avoid buying lenses involved into video shooting." and that "... we ...


3

Everything in Mike Sowsun's answer is correct and I concur with his assessment. There is at least one additional consideration that sometimes gives a current lens such as the EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS STM an advantage over an older lens such as the EF 100-300mm f/4.5-5.6: Canon (and other manufacturers are similar) generally supports a lens for around seven ...


3

The only way to know the effect of particular marks on lens elements is to take test images with different settings and lighting conditions. For this particular lens, I would expect the marks: May be limited to the coating and have no discernible effect on image quality. May be visible when the lens is stopped down. Could cause glare or flare when used in ...


2

First, figure out a reasonable price. No, wait: first, let go of any expectation that you'll get back close to the price you paid. That money is gone, time has passed, and people are excited about new models (for the same reasons you want to upgrade). Second, then, find a reasonable price. I think the best way to do this is to look on reputable sites that ...


2

I've never owned nor used a D600, but most of the reports I have read indicate that after extended usage the problem more or less goes away. Of course the oil/dust already on the sensor, which is actually on the IR filter in front of the sensor, must be cleaned. But after the initial 'break-in' period as the excess is slung off of the parts that it was ...


2

Ensure you test the camera at its highest possible shutter speed. Try this in both single shot and multiple shot mode. Look for any darkening of the frame that could indicate the shutter is starting to fail. Also closely inspect some shots and look for dots (like dirt) and more importantly streaks (grease or worse scratches) on the sensor. Shooting ...


2

I have a Nikon D600, and have had it warranty "repaired" by Nikon UK 3 times so far. Each time I have only had between 300 and 400 actuations on the shutter mechanism before having to return it. I've just received it back again from the third time so I will have to see how it works out. The issue does seem to have been less noticeable each time but perhaps ...


2

Just like buying anything used, what you're looking for is the age of the camera, and how much wear'n'tear or damage you're willing to trade for the discounted price, and how trustworthy you think the seller is. Think of the click count (shutter actuations) like mileage on a used car. At a certain point, it may not be worth it any more given how much ...


2

Depending on what the quality control is like for new lenses - most likely a few specimens are pulled off the line and tested - it's possible that refurbished lenses can generally be be more reliable than new, in that they get more fully bench tested compared to new lenses that go out the door. I would think a refurb would be less likely to have issues with ...


2

It's a gamble. In most cases, you won't need the warranty — but in the cases where you do, you'd be sorry to not have it, because repairs can be expensive. If most cameras needed warranty repair, the manufacturer would go out of business; it's generally the case that quality assurance is pretty good out of the box and most cameras are buy-and-forget. There ...


2

Nothing gets broken, but the shutter will wear out. If you take a look at DSLR second hand sales (like eBay) you will notice either the seller specifying the shutter count, or someone interested asking about it. As some tutorial websites are saying, shutter count is like the mileage at a car. Digital Photography School The inner workings of a camera are ...


2

The part which has the scratch is UV and IR blocking glass - yes, it is quite easy to replace it in many cameras. However, you should be attentive during disassembly and assembly - do not neglect the warnings which tutorials give. There is no reason to change it if you see no impact on quality. You probably will if you close the aperture down to F22 or F32....


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