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26

You need to upgrade your camera when, and only when, you need a camera that can do something in particular that your current camera can not. This is not only true for your camera body but for your lenses and any other accessories that you might need in order to produce a photo you desire. The specific reasons for upgrading a camera body can be as varied as ...


18

A wonderful thing about photography is that it's multiple hobbies in one. You can enjoy the act of capturing moments distinct from the production of final images. You can develop your skill in print-making without taking pictures yourself. You can collect photographs taken by the masters. You can participate in contests. And, you can enjoy the gear ...


15

It really depends on what you want to do with the camera. After all, there are many great photos that have been taken with older cameras, both when they were the hot new model and when they were no longer on the cutting edge. As with all equipment recommendations it comes down to the question of what do the technical demands of the photos you want to take ...


12

When you need to. That is the one and only time you need to think about it. If the answer to one or more of these questions is a Yes, then you may want to consider an upgrade... Do you need a shallower depth of field? Do you need a bazillion megapixels? Do you want to use old or specific lenses that require full frame? Is your viewfinder too small? ...


11

You should only upgrade when you need to. Chances are good you won't wait that long or be that sensible. ;) So, basically, to me, it comes down to a few "tipping points" as to when "upgrading" (more realistically you may be sidegrading [e.g., crop to full frame], or expanding [e.g., adding mirrorless to a dSLR rather than replacing it]) has been worth it ...


10

Well, it's not just what's in CS6. It's what's in CS4-6. You can look up the feature lists and comparison's on Adobe's site to help you decide. We can't tell you if the value is enough for you to move forward. But some helpful things... Content aware actions are extremely helpful Camera Raw is much more capable and works with the modern cameras Speed has ...


10

The 550 has enough quality for the images. So the bump in the road is your lens. I would go for a better quality lens and keep the 550 body. Then post-processing is your last stop on your way to good quality shots. That said, the body is a tool, and if you feel that you cannot create good enough images that maybe your problem is the camera body and how it ...


10

Here are a couple of different common paths you could go that are sub-$1000. But as everyone is telling you, usage is the easiest way to narrow down your choices to something you actually need, rather than something you just want. The easiest way to really start considering an "upgrade" from the kit lens is to consider in what ways the kit lens frustrates ...


10

I recently upgraded from a D40 to a D800. That's quite a jump for someone who considers themselves just an enthusiast. While I won't waste your time going into the why behind my purchase, I can tell you that the D800 has reinvigorated my interest in photography not only from a technical competency point of view (this camera has far more to learn about) but ...


10

It is very unlikely that Canon will dump the EF-S mount any time soon. As you note it was derived from the EF mount, which is significantly older but still going strong. In fact, Canon's introduction of the EF-M derivative last year, if anything, indicated Canon is nowhere near phasing out the system. Camera mounts are not replaced nearly as often as other ...


9

If you don't have an investment in the system, there's no compelling reason to stay with the same brand when upgrading. Since you've had your camera for a while, you should think about what you like about it and what you're missing. It sounds like there are a few things about the Canon model that really appeal to you, so that's good. I'd suggest making an ...


9

The next camera will certainly be better but each moment you wait is a missed opportunity for photography. Improvements are incremental from year to year. Last year's model are almost as good as this year's but they are much better than those 5 years ago. This is on average and there were some years where the performance did not improve or even reduces ...


8

Unless you have a limitation in mind with the body you have, whether that be autofocus speed, autofocus accuracy, low-light ISO performance, fps - then you should probably invest in lenses, flashes/triggers, tripod and/or software. Lenses make a much bigger difference in sharpness, contrast, clarity than upgrading your body will. Lighting is second in how ...


8

I am going to answer this from the perspective of "want" rather than "Need" which has been handled really well by Michael Clarks answer. Unless you are a Pro and the camera is just a tool, the whole feeling of owning a new camera for enthusiasts and hobbyists, is amazing. Its equal to driving a new car straight from the forecourt. For most enthusiasts, it ...


7

Nobody's actually asking what you use the camera for, so there's no way to tell whether or not the upgrade will benefit you. I recently bought a T3i to be a second body along with a 7D; buying a second 7D seemed overkill for what I was using it for. Whether upgrading to the 7D makes sense depends on what you're doing with it. How often do you hit a ...


7

You should have a need in mind when looking for a new camera instead of just desiring a new camera. If your current camera fits your needs, keep it and put the money towards new lenses or something. For example, I recently purchased a newer (more pro-ish camera replacing my 1000d with the 60d). I wanted it because it has a much better autofocus, has the ...


6

I would say, whilst not necessarily L lenses, that you would indeed be better off buying better lenses to go on your existing camera. The 550D is a very capable camera, and I certainly had some L glass (the 24 f/1.4 and 100-400) on my 7D before moving up to full frame. But there may be alternatives to L that you hadn't considered - two EF-S lenses for a ...


6

There is a bug in Lightroom 4 that can cause you to lose your point tone curve settings in existing images, as detailed here. This is a serious bug, if you use point curves. There are other relatively minor issues detailed at that link as well. The behavior of Pick/Reject flags changes in Lightroom 4. Now when you flag an image, the flag is global, instead ...


6

Before looking at the next camera, make sure you have the best lenses for your needs. A good macro lens for example will make much more difference than a change in camera. The same is true of long fast lenses. If you have enough good lenses though, it gets hard to change camera brands, so the first factor to consider is if you are willing to change brands ...


6

Unlike Canon where you should crop the image by yourself, Nikon FX cameras have a DX crop mode for using DX lenses. On an FX-format camera with a DX lens mounted, the camera will automatically engage its built-in DX crop mode, thus recording an image only from the center section of the sensor.


5

The difference can be huge or unnoticeable depending on how you use the camera - for example, the faster burst rate means nothing if you never use burst mode or can make a huge difference if you always shoot in burst mode - also better low light performance means nothing if you always shoot in bright sunlight. You shouldn't be asking if the camera body is a ...


5

I'm going to step around the discussion of the 17-55 EF-S lens and its comparison to an L lens as thats a loaded question that has lots of heated debate surrounding it. To address the meat of your question which I take as 'I want to upgrade to an L lens, which one?' that depends on what you're looking for in a lens. Unfortunately there isn't a single L ...


5

The EF-S 17-55 f/2.8 isn't an "L" lens -- that's absolutely true. Before dismissing it, though, I think it's important to remember that Canon won't label any EF-S lens an "L" since it wouldn't work on their pro bodies. The performance of the lens, though, is considered to be excellent -- definitely competitive with "L" offerings, and very possibly even ...


5

No, you don't need to install previous updates if installing a newer one, and on the camera settings it's possible to check the firmware version by doing the following: 1. Enter Setup Menu 2. Click on Firmware Settings option This link has the latest firmwares available for Nikon cameras: https://support.nikonusa.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/13783/~/...


5

I think you've identified features that people upgrade to a new camera for, not the reasons people upgrade. You don't upgrade to get a faster AF system, you upgrade to be able to catch focus on the basketball player running by you, for example. You need to identify what you want to do and how your current camera is limiting you (and be sure that this is a ...


5

Without the 70D, you cannot print that image that little bit larger. Without the 10-18mm, you cannot get that image at all. Remember: This does not hold true in general. The 70D might as well be the key equipment required to get a certain shot, but that shot will not be a landscape shot.


5

These lenses will work on current camera bodies, keeping in mind the EF vs EF-S distinction as explained at What is the difference between EF and EF-S lenses?. (EF-S corresponds to an APS-C sized sensor, like that in your dad's 60D — see the linked question and some related ones for some Canon-specific details.) Of the lenses you've listed, the Zeiss manual ...


4

Yes. It's an upgrade in every way except for image quality. Ergonomics, viewfinder, build quality, auto-focus, maximum shots per second, you name it. But ultimately they have very similar sensors that will produce almost identical images under ideal circumstances.


4

I think basically now is the time to look hard at lens lineups and how they are different. But I think you're essentially in this situation: After 2 years of amateur photo, buy a new body or a great lens?, but with more freedom since you don't have a large lens investment. If you're really hating the ergonomics of your current camera, or tempted by ...


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