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28

You need to upgrade your camera when, and only when, you need a camera that can do something in particular that your current camera can not. This is not only true for your camera body but for your lenses and any other accessories that you might need in order to produce a photo you desire. The specific reasons for upgrading a camera body can be as varied as ...


15

It really depends on what you want to do with the camera. After all, there are many great photos that have been taken with older cameras, both when they were the hot new model and when they were no longer on the cutting edge. As with all equipment recommendations it comes down to the question of what do the technical demands of the photos you want to take ...


12

When you need to. That is the one and only time you need to think about it. If the answer to one or more of these questions is a Yes, then you may want to consider an upgrade... Do you need a shallower depth of field? Do you need a bazillion megapixels? Do you want to use old or specific lenses that require full frame? Is your viewfinder too small? ...


12

You should only upgrade when you need to. Chances are good you won't wait that long or be that sensible. ;) So, basically, to me, it comes down to a few "tipping points" as to when "upgrading" (more realistically you may be sidegrading [e.g., crop to full frame], or expanding [e.g., adding mirrorless to a dSLR rather than replacing it]) has been worth it ...


10

Here are a couple of different common paths you could go that are sub-$1000. But as everyone is telling you, usage is the easiest way to narrow down your choices to something you actually need, rather than something you just want. The easiest way to really start considering an "upgrade" from the kit lens is to consider in what ways the kit lens frustrates ...


9

The next camera will certainly be better but each moment you wait is a missed opportunity for photography. Improvements are incremental from year to year. Last year's model are almost as good as this year's but they are much better than those 5 years ago. This is on average and there were some years where the performance did not improve or even reduces ...


9

I am going to answer this from the perspective of "want" rather than "Need" which has been handled really well by Michael Clarks answer. Unless you are a Pro and the camera is just a tool, the whole feeling of owning a new camera for enthusiasts and hobbyists, is amazing. Its equal to driving a new car straight from the forecourt. For most enthusiasts, it ...


5

I think you've identified features that people upgrade to a new camera for, not the reasons people upgrade. You don't upgrade to get a faster AF system, you upgrade to be able to catch focus on the basketball player running by you, for example. You need to identify what you want to do and how your current camera is limiting you (and be sure that this is a ...


5

Without the 70D, you cannot print that image that little bit larger. Without the 10-18mm, you cannot get that image at all. Remember: This does not hold true in general. The 70D might as well be the key equipment required to get a certain shot, but that shot will not be a landscape shot.


5

No, you don't need to install previous updates if installing a newer one, and on the camera settings it's possible to check the firmware version by doing the following: 1. Enter Setup Menu 2. Click on Firmware Settings option This link has the latest firmwares available for Nikon cameras: https://support.nikonusa.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/13783/~/...


5

These lenses will work on current camera bodies, keeping in mind the EF vs EF-S distinction as explained at What is the difference between EF and EF-S lenses?. (EF-S corresponds to an APS-C sized sensor, like that in your dad's 60D — see the linked question and some related ones for some Canon-specific details.) Of the lenses you've listed, the Zeiss manual ...


4

Edited: It seems that you can upgrade from Lightroom v1.x, v2.x, v3.x and v4.x to v5 for the same price (upgrade and not full software). Last time I checked I haven't found this possibility. Good news for everyone :) Regarding your Lightroom software v3.5, installing Lightroom 5 will not modify your 3.5 installation (you will still be able to launch ...


4

Every improved feature is a a reason to upgrade for someone. There are plenty which come to mind but it depends on where you are starting from and your photography: If my camera did not have a 100% coverage viewfinder, it would be the first reason to upgrade. A weather-sealed body and matching lenses is essential for some environments. I don't control the ...


4

Let me start by saying there isn't a wrong answer. Either camera you suggested is a HUGE improvement over an entry level model and you are jumping pretty much clean over the mid-range models. I personally jumped from an xTi (400D) to a 5D Mark iii, but I made that large of a jump because I was starting commercial photography work on the side. I know you ...


4

I want to challenge the question, here. "Full frame" isn't an upgrade. It's a different format. That format has strengths, and it also has drawbacks. Think of this as someone asking when it's the right time to upgrade from a sports car to a pickup truck — that's just not the way to think about it. You can read more about differences between the common APS-C ...


4

Is there a "right" time to buy camera bodies, both mirrorless in my case as well as DSLRs? Yes. But like any other camera purchase decision, it will be highly individual, depending on a number of factors, such as what your budget is, what your needs are, and how much you care about specific aspects of image quality. For some people, with purchasing full ...


4

Yes. Stop shopping; start shooting. The lenses you have are what most folks would already choose for landscapes, cityscapes, and street shooting. If you don't know what lens you should "upgrade" to, then chances are good, you're not ready to upgrade. You need more experience with the gear you do have. And it's when a specific frustration starts to eat ...


4

So thinking logically about your question, both the Canon T3i and the 70D are both APS-C cameras and 18mp against the 20mp of the 70D means there's nothing in it, 5472 x 3648 70D against 5184 x 3456 T3i(aka 600D) image resolution. Both cameras are equally capable of taking an excellent quality photograph! After all it's the person behind the camera that ...


4

You misunderstand Auto FP, which starts just above the cameras maximum sync speed, and allows up to the maximum shutter speed the camera permits (1/8000 second on some models) if with a HSS flash unit. However beware, the HSS flash becomes continuous light for the duration, and maximum power level is reduced to about 20%, so range is limited. See http://www....


3

This really depends but if you pay attention to the cycle of upgrades between successive models in a series, the tendency is to upgrade slower at the higher end and fastest at the low-end. This is not an absolute rule but is generally applicable. The common element is that all cameras made by companies seeking profitability. There is often a large cost in ...


3

Sometimes you have to upgrade to a required level! You will have to check out the release nose of the latest firmware, it will tell you whether it is a cumulative update or you need to install a previous firmware first. Been there, done this. (Just a quick note: installing the latest firmware is sometimes not beneficial. I resisted to install a newer ...


3

You say the 550D is happily serving all your needs and that you're only looking to upgrade because "it is time". May I suggest keep your 550D. It's a great camera by all means and you're already enjoying it. You can put the money you were going to spend on the camera (both that you mention would set you back more than a thousand pounds) and instead invest ...


3

Since you should shoot in raw this color enhancement stuff is more or less pointless. It just look better on cam screen on location, but on the computer at home the raw files look nearly the same. Also the Canon 600D is older as the Nikon D3200, so it would be also not become better. So some suggestions: If you shoot mainly in good light conditions and ...


3

As others pointed out, there are a lot of subjective things here. But let's look at numbers and specification: http://snapsort.com/compare/Canon-600d-vs-Nikon-D3200/score Measurements by DXOmark shows that 600D is worse than D3200 for essentially all metrics. Not really a Nikon Vs Canon debate, but just that the D3200 is a bit newer than the 600D. You're ...


3

A short survey of what you've got: The Canon EOS 60D Is an APS-C camera introduced in August 2010 to replace the EOS 50D. It was supplanted by the EOS 70D in July 2013. The 70D has since been replaced by the 80D. But that's not all of the story. When Canon "replaced" the 50D they did so with two camera models: The 60D was the continuation of the 'x0D' ...


3

What is my upgrade path from a D3400 for better low light performance, that will also increase my keeper rate? Lights, modifiers, and stands, not different cameras and more lenses. If you want to get serious about portraiture and headshots, you're going to have to learn how to use lights. For your currently stated budget you can outfit yourself fairly well....


2

I've now successfully upgraded the firmware in my EOS-1Ds using a 8 GB CF card that was formatted in camera to a 2 GB FAT16 partition. The card used was a Trancend CompactFlash 133x 8 GB.


2

The EF-S 15-85mm f/3.5-5.6 IS lens is a perfect example of a lens that attempts to be too much of too many different things and as a result doesn't do much of anything as well as a more limited lens can. For a detailed look at the lens, please see: What's wrong with the Canon EF-S 15-85mm? That being the case, it's not likely anyone will come up with ...


2

I always push photographers into the better lens category. Ideally, an investment in both will pay off for your pictures - but if you can only choose one -- invest in a better lens. You should determine what your photo needs are. I personally shoot Nikon, so the lenses are a bit different - but I shoot primarily with 3 different lenses exclusively. My ...


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